Featured Post

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

FEAST OF OUR HOLY GUARDIAN ANGELS Psalm 91, verse 5-6 5 You shall not fear the terror of the night nor the arrow that flies ...

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Mark, Chapter 9, Verse 31-32
31 He was teaching his disciples and telling them, “The Son of Man is to be handed over to men and they will kill him, and three days after his death he will rise.” 32 But they did not understand the saying, and they were afraid to question him.

Many times we are afraid to ask a question of the Lord because we do not want to know the answer. We measure success with an earthly yardstick and not a heavenly one. Christ asks us to trust in Him. The heavenly yardstick is this as spoken by Michael the Archangel, “Who is like God?

We are in a battle with the world, the flesh and the Devil. Let us remember that St. Michael, along with our Guardian Angel stand to defend us from perdition. No harm can come to the children of God who place their trust in the Precious Blood. We must not be afraid to ask for Michaels help and to always call on Mary the Queen of Angels whose children we are through Christ. We must not be afraid to question science, literature, or art in its many forms as these achievements of human works are often pressed into service by the Devil and his cohorts.

God’s yardstick, “Who is like God?” leads us to Love Him and to love our neighbors.

Why is this commandment to love God and our neighbor called the great commandment ?

Because in these two are contained all the others, so that he who fulfills these fulfills the whole law. For whoever loves God with his whole heart does not murmur against God; does not dishonor His name by cursing and swearing; does not desecrate the Sabbath-day, because he knows that all this is offensive to God. On the contrary, he hopes in God; gives thanks and praise to God; sanctifies the Sundays and holy- days, because he knows this to be pleasing to God; observes the precepts of the Church, because he knows it to be the will of God that he should hear the Church; honors his parents; does no injury to his neighbor; does not commit adultery; does not steal; slanders no one; bears no false witness; pronounces no unjust judgment; is not envious, malicious, unmerciful, but rather practices towards every one the corporal and spiritual works of mercy; and all this because, out of love to God, he loves his neighbor as himself. Thus love fulfills all the commandments.[1]

Continuing our study of John McCain’s book “Character is Destiny”[2] John points out that an understanding heart must be generous (Oseola McCarty), forgiving (Nelson Mandela), tolerant (Four Chaplains), full of mercy (Mother Antonia), faithful (Christian Guard at Hua Lo prison) and compassionate (Maximilian Kolbe). John now suggests for us that adding to our understanding heart we must strive to have a creative mind. A creative mind must be built on a thirst or curiosity in the mysteries of creation. John points out as an example of curiosity the renowned Charles Darwin.



McCain says of Darwin:

His curiosity and courage helped him to discover the history of nature, and start an argument that has continued for 150 years. A curious thing about the father of the theory of evolution is that he himself was an avowed agnostic, keeping to his scientific methods. The evolution of all life on earth, including man, was and still is, in some quarters, considered an affront to the belief that the progress of the human race over time bears the unmistakable sign of the divine spark in our nature. But why can we not be content in our faith with the understanding that God’s divine intelligence, which exists beyond time and space, and has left us to choose by the exercise of our free will whether to accept His grace or reject it, could have left nature to work its physical changes upon us? We have a second nature, a moral nature, that is not determined by ecological change but by the workings of our conscience. Is not our conscience and its effect upon our will enough confirmation for the believer that God, the Creator, has endowed us with the divine spark of His love to improve, if we so choose, our second nature in service to Him? It is enough, I believe, for anyone who can see in our struggle to be good a divine purpose, as we may still glimpse in the wonders of nature the divine intelligence that created it and set it all in motion. To believe and follow God is our choice. Not all will follow. Our principal belief is in our salvation not in this life but the next. Man and nature, even at their cruelest, cannot deny us that, nor the gloriousness of His creation, a gloriousness that human qualities like curiosity have led us to appreciate with humility and awe. Time and the laws of nature do not expose the absence of God, Whose proofs are a matter for the heart to contemplate, a matter of faith.



[1] Goffine’s Devout Instructions, 1896.
[2] McCain, John and Salter, Mark. (2005) Character is destiny. Random House, New York



No comments:

Post a Comment