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Friday, November 20, 2015

Friday, November 20, 2015

1 Samuel, Chapter 28, Verse 20
Immediately Saul fell full length on the ground, in great fear because of Samuel’s message. He had no strength left, since he had eaten nothing all that day and night.

Christ is the strength of the weak and the humble confidence of those who trust in him. Christ says to us, “My sheep hear my voice, says the Lord; I know them, and they follow me. (Jn. 10:27) Saul was in great fear because the spirit of God had long ago left him and he no longer heard the voice of God. In desperation now that Samuel had died was to have the witch of Endor act as a medium to conjure up the spirit of Samuel to help save him from the Philistines. Saul broke his own laws by seeking the aid of a sorcerer. The Israelites were a Holy people and Saul could not understand the Ends never justify the means. No we must be calm and listen to the voice of he that was the epitome of fairness and justice that took upon Himself our sins to the cross and thus bearing our guilt to make us a Holy people.

America is now at the threshold of history. We see the camps of the Philistines. The gut instinct is to do battle, but what is the Lord calling us to do? American’s are a just people and fair people and our hearts go out to the world.

Many years ago while reviewing the CIA handbook I noticed that economically all of the nations that have been giving us the most trouble militarily were also on the list of those countries with the worst per capita income: people who make less than 200 dollars a year. I thought rather than do battle with a number of of these people in some way if we were to bring the economic power of America to these people and help them to improve their lives and rid themselves of the gangs and dictators. Thus bringing up their per capita income; what would the effect be on those who we may have to embattle? I questioned would improving their lives in their own country decrease our need to do battle? I decided to do an experiment. With a little research I invested in one of the stocks from one of the poorest countries Zimbabwe. After three months I sold my stock after doubling my money. My point is perhaps we as America’s can do more by helping the downtrodden in building up their own countries. American’s are fair people.

According to John McCain a person or nations character determines its destiny. In our book study of Character is Destiny[1], John points out the person who most exemplifies the characteristic of fairness is that of Martin Luther King, Jr.  

John says of King:

From a jail cell he wrote a letter that is one of the most celebrated documents in American history, and summoned his country to the cause of justice. “My Dear Fellow Clergymen,” it began. Recognizing that his correspondents were “men of genuine good will and your criticisms sincerely set forth,” he promised to respond in patient and reasonable terms. They were reasonable terms, and undeniably fair, but patient they were not.
We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God-given rights. . . . Perhaps it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging dark of segregation to say, “Wait.” But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; when you have seen hate-filled policemen curse, kick and even kill your black brothers and sisters; when you see the vast majority of your twenty million Negro brothers smothering in an airtight cage of poverty in the midst of an affluent society; when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year-old daughter why she can’t go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Funtown is closed to colored children, and see ominous clouds of inferiority beginning to form in her little mental sky, and see her beginning to distort her personality by developing unconscious bitterness toward white people; when you have to concoct an answer for a five-year-old son who is asking: “Daddy, why do white people treat colored people so mean?”; when you take a cross-country drive and find it necessary to sleep night after night in the uncomfortable corners of your automobile because no motel will accept you; when you are humiliated day in and day out by nagging signs reading “white” and “colored”; when your first name becomes “nigger,” your middle name becomes “boy” (however old you are) and your last name becomes “John,” and your wife and mother are never given the respected title “Mrs.”; when you are harried by day and haunted by night by the fact that you are a Negro, living constantly at tiptoe stance, never quite knowing what to expect next, and are plagued with inner fears and outer resentments; when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of “nobodiness” then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait. There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of despair.
America still struggles internally and externally to arrive at the place Dr. King had summoned us to, that exalted place that had been the highest ambition of our Founding Fathers and the highest value we recommend to the rest of the world; the place where all people are recognized as equal, and endowed by their Creator with inalienable rights. African Americans recognize the debt they owe Dr. King’s courage, wisdom, and unshakable sense of fairness. But Americans of European descent owe him a greater one. At the cost of his life, he helped save us from a terrible disgrace, the betrayal of our country, and the principles that have ennobled our history. And that is a debt we must happily bear forever.



[1] McCain, John and Salter, Mark. (2005) Character is destiny. Random House, New York.

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