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Sunday, March 27, 2016

Easter Monday, March 27, 2016

Jeremiah, Chapter 46, Verse 27-28
27 But you, my servant Jacob, do not fear; do not be dismayed, Israel! Listen! I will deliver you from far-off lands; your offspring, from the land of their exile. Jacob shall again find rest, secure, with none to frighten him. 28 You, Jacob my servant, must not fear—oracle of the LORD—for I am with you; I will make an end of all the nations to which I have driven you, But of you I will not make an end: I will chastise you as you deserve, I cannot let you go unpunished.

Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went away quickly from the tomb, fearful yet overjoyed, and ran to announce the news to his disciples. And behold, Jesus met them on their way and greeted them.
They approached, embraced his feet, and did him homage. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid. Go tell my brothers to go to Galilee, and there they will see me.” (Mt. 28:8-10)

Has your Lenten sacrifice been less than you wanted and is Easter been an emotional letdown? Well? Welcome to the human condition. Emotions are what being human is about. Imagine the emotions of Peter after the resurrection. If your emotions or sinfulness which for some reason you have committed despite your best efforts have left you flat. You are human. Remember the disciples on the road to Emmaus; they were at left flat at the loss of the Christ. Like Peter they felt they could have done more. Today walk with our Lord tell Him all. (See Divine Mercy note)

In a sermon by Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas she states:

“Put away the gods that your ancestors served...” Joshua declares. Doing that requires an act of self-examination. Spend at least five minutes with each question; even if all you do is listen to your heart.

1. What are the gods that I serve?
2. What does my bank statement or my credit card statement say about my values?
3. What does the way I spend my free time say about what matters most to me?
4. How does the way that I treat family-members and co-workers, neighbors and friends show which gods I serve?
5. To what do I give my best, most focused attention and care?
6. What do I Really care about?
7. What motives really drive me?
8. What goals really draw me forward?
9. Are there compulsive patterns of thought or behavior to which I am excessively attached?
You and I can go to church and say very sincerely that we worship God, but in the hurly-burly of daily life there are all kinds of lesser gods that tug at us and clamor for our attention and our devotion.[1]

Blessed are the poor in spirit; for theirs is the Kingdom of heaven. (Mt. 5:3)

 

Easter Monday[2] was reserved as a special day for rest and relaxation. Its most distinctive feature is the Emmaus walk, a leisurely constitution inspired by the Gospel of the day (Luke 24.13-35). This can take the form of a stroll through field or forest or, as in French Canada, a visit to one's grandparents.

Why did Jesus appear as a stranger to the two disciples? He appeared to them as a stranger, says St. Gregory, because He meant to deal with them according to their dispositions, and according to the firmness of their faith. They seemed not to have believed in Him as the Son of God, but to have expected a hero or prince who should deliver them from their subjection to the Romans. Thus Christ was, indeed, yet a stranger in their hearts, and chose to appear to them as such, to free those who loved Him from their false notions, to convince them of the necessity of His passion, and to reveal Himself to them, as soon as their understandings should be enlightened, and their hearts filled with desire. Thus God orders the disposal of His graces according to our dispositions; according to our faith and trust ; according to our love and fidelity. (Goffine’s Divine Instructions)




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