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Saturday, October 1, 2016

Sunday, October 2, 2016

John, Chapter 5, Verse 20
For the Father loves his Son and shows him everything that he himself does, and he will show him greater works than these, so that you may be amazed.

Does God derive anything from having us fear Him?

His only wish is to see us truly growing and fruitful. He made us and as a loving father knows our needs both physical and spiritual. If we have a loving fear of our father we are compelled by the Holy Spirit into spiritual leadership avoiding sloth which often comes as a result of being stuck in a victim mentality or not letting go of rage by forgiving the offender.

Today seek the Father’s compassion by going to confession then arise and grow in spiritual leadership.

As we grow in our spiritual leadership[1] we tend to be:

·        Confident in God
·        Know God
·        Seek God’s will
·        Self-sacrifice
·        Serve all
·        Motivated by love
·        Trust the Holy Spirit
·        Lead others



Arbinger[2]

Our mindset connects or disconnects us with others—there are a number of ways we can “see” others from an inward mindset. Traditionally, Arbinger has categorized these three ways of seeing others as obstacles, vehicles or simply irrelevant. When I’m seeing someone as an obstacle, I see them as “in my way”, or as a hindrance to what I’m seeking to accomplish. When I’m seeing someone as a vehicle, I use them to get me what I want, or where I need to go. They might have information or connections that are valuable to me, so I “play nice” until I get what I want. When someone is irrelevant to me, I don’t care about them and likely don’t allow their humanity to impact me in any way. All three of these labels are ultimately ways that I objectify others. When I’m seeing someone as an obstacle, vehicle or irrelevancy, I’m not seeing them as a human being with needs, concerns, hopes and fears similar to my own. Think of someone who you struggle to see as a person. Perhaps they get on your nerves frequently, or perhaps you avoid them at all costs. This person might be a coworker, a family member, a neighbor—someone with whom you feel your relationship could improve. How do you see this particular person? Are they often an obstacle? A vehicle? Mostly irrelevant? If the person you have in mind feels like an obstacle to you, consider how you might not be receiving their goodness or kindness. If this person feels more like a vehicle to you, contemplate what needs they might have that you’re failing to see? Are you looking to simply “get”, or are you willing to give? For someone you’re seeing as irrelevant, what must it feel like for him or her to feel ignored, barely noticed or hardly cared about? Have you ever been seen as an obstacle, a vehicle or irrelevant? How did it feel? Ponder what underlying qualities you might be missing in the person you’re thinking of. What might the people who love them see in them?

Islamic New Year[3]

The Islamic New Year commemorates Muhammad's migration from Mecca to Medina.  This migration was to escape the oppression and violence that the non-Muslim Quraish, the predominant tribe of Mecca, had been inflicting on him and his companions.  He escaped to Medina on camel with his best friend, Abu Bakr.  In Medina, Saudi Arabia, they were allowed to recover and grow spiritually and as a community.
Islamic New Year Facts
·         Muharram (1st first month of the Islamic calendar), is the holiest month after Ramadan.  This month is most recommended by Muhammad to fast and worship in.
·         The Islamic method of dating was invented by Umar ibn Al-Khattab, a close friend of Muhammad.  He was the second Islamic Caliph (rulers) and in the year 638 he standardize the many calendars of the Arabian peninsula.
·         The Islamic calendar is lunar cycle based and contains twelve months that make up a total of 354.36 days together.
·         There are parallels between this holiday and the day of Ashura.  Ashura commemorates what Muslims believe is Moses crossing the Red Sea to escape the oppressive Pharaoh on Ashura.  Similarly, the Islamic New Year marks Muhammad's crossing the desert between Mecca and Medina to escape the oppressive Quraish nobles.  For both observances, Muhammad recommended Muslims to fast.
·         The Islamic calendar is abbreviated A.H. or Anno Hegirae in Western languages.  The first date on the Islamic calendar, 1,1 Muharram A.H. corresponds to July 16, year 622

Rosh Hashana[4]

Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year.  Rosh Hashanah literally translates to the Head of the Year.  It is a two day festival.  In the Bible, it is called Yom Ha-Zikkaron, the day of remembrance or Yom Teruah the day of the sounding of the shofar-(Leviticus 23:24-25). Jews start Rosh Hashanah festivals with lighting of the candles and synagogue prayers.  On the eve of Rosh Hashanah, Jews eat an apple dipped in honey to signify a sweet new year to come.  They also place a fishes head at the table to commemorate 'being a head and not a tail'.
Rosh Hashana Facts

·         In synagogues it is common for 100 notes to be sounded with a Ram's horn as a call to repentance.
·         Jews typically wear new clothes on Rosh Hashanah and eat new fruits that have not yet been tasted in the season.  Customary foods include round hallah bread with raisins, pomegranates, pumpkins, carrots, and honey cake.
·         For Rosh Hashana, many Jews 'cast off their sins' to a running water stream/sea containing fish (the Tashlich custom).  This is to symbolically purge one's body of sin and cast the sins onto the fish.
·         On Rosh Hashanah, it is believed that the fate of all Jews and Gentiles is defined by God for that year.  Jews greet each other with many Happy New Year wishes.  It is customary to therefore greet people with a wish for a happy New Year and to 'be inscribed for a good year' - meaning to be allocated by God a full year of healthy life.
·         New Year prayers include many passages relating to the sovereignty and dominion of God over the entire world.  One of these prayers is recited daily and is called Aleinu leshabei'ach (it is our duty to praise God).  However, on Rosh Hashanah, during this prayer, Orthodox Jews bow down to accept the full Sovereignty of the Lord.

Feast of the holy Rosary[5]

This feast was fixed for the first Sunday in October by Pope Clement XI; in perpetual commemoration of a celebrated feast was fixed for the first Sunday in October by Pope double victory gained by the Christians at Lepanto, in 1571, under Pope St. Pius V. , and at Belgrade, under Pope Clement XI., through the intercession of the Virgin Mary, who had been invoked by saying the Holy Rosary. It is at the same time the principal feast of the Arch-confraternity of the Holy Rosary. In 1885 Pope Leo XIII., ordered the Rosary to be recited every day during the month of October in every parish church and cathedral throughout the world, and those of the faithful who cannot be present at this recital he exhorted to say it with their families or in private. The Holy Rosary is a form of prayer in which there is first said the Apostles Creed, and then fifteen decades, each one of which consists of ten Hail Mary’s. Each decade has one Our Father to be said before it, and is followed by a meditation upon some one mystery of our redemption. It is called the Rosary, or Wreath of Roses, because the joyful, the sorrowful, and the glorious mysteries, aptly symbolized by the leaves, the thorns, the flower, of which the rose consists with the prayers and praises that are blended together compose, as it were, a wreath or crown. It is also called the Psalter, because it contains a hundred and fifty Hail Mary’s, as the Psalter of David contains a hundred and fifty psalms, and because it is used in place of the singing of psalms, as practiced in former times. There are three parts in the Rosary the joyful, the sorrowful, the glorious. The joyful part consists of the five first decades, to which are attached five mysteries of the incarnation of Jesus Christ, through which, full of joy, we speak to Mary of Him: 1. Whom she conceived while a virgin. 2. Whom she bore to Elizabeth. 3. Whom she brought forth while a virgin. 4. Whom she offered to God in the temple. 5. Whom she found the temple. (This is said particularly in Advent.) The sorrowful part, in like manner, contains five decades, in connection with which there are presented for our meditation five mysteries of the passion and death of Jesus: 1. Who for us sweat blood. 2. Who for us was scourged. 3. Who for us was crowned with thorns. 4. Who for us bore the heavy cross. 5. Who for us was crucified. (This is said particularly in Lent.) The glorious part, consisting of the last five decades, reminds us of the glory of Christ and of the Blessed Virgin by five mysteries in which we commemorate Him: 1. Who rose from the dead. 2. Who ascended into heaven. 3. Who sent to us the Holy Ghost. 4. Who received thee, O Virgin, into heaven. 5. Who crowned thee, O Virgin, in heaven. (This part is said particularly at Eastertide.) How wras this prayer introduced into the Church? St. Dominic had for many years preached against the errors of the Albigenses and other heretics, with such zeal and profound ability that they were often convinced. But nevertheless the results were unimportant; but few returned to the bosom of the Catholic Church. In this discouraging state of things St. Dominic redoubled his prayers and works of penance, and in particular besought Mary for support and assistance. One day Mary appeared to him and taught him the Rosary. He zealously labored to introduce everywhere this manner of prayer, and from that time preached with such success that in a short period more than one hundred thousand heretics and sinners were converted. The divine origin of the Rosary is testified to by the bull of Gregory XIII of the year 1577.

Is the Rosary a profitable method of prayer? Yes; for by bringing before the eyes of the spirit the fundamental mysteries of Christianity it supplies us with the strongest motives to love God, to hate sin, to subdue the passions, to condemn the world and its vanity, and to strive after Christian perfection, in order that we may gain those happy mansions which Jesus prepares for us. The Rosary, besides, brings before us living examples Jesus and Mary whom we must follow, and encourages us to good works by pointing to the all-powerful grace procured for us by Jesus, and the all-prevailing intercession of the gracious Mother of God. Let us not be ashamed to carry the beads with us, for otherwise we might be ashamed of being Catholics; let us say the Rosary often every evening as was the custom with Catholics in former times, and we shall find that, as in St. Dominic s day it was a wholesome check to error, so too in our times it will be, if said aright, a powerful weapon against heresy and unbelief, and will increase faith, piety, and virtue.



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