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Friday, January 27, 2017

Saturday, January 28, 2017

His mercy is from age to age to those who fear him.


Exodus, Chapter 3, Verse 6
I am the God of your father, he continued, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.

This is Moses first encounter with the Living God. Moses responded with natural fear thus he tried to hide himself just as Adam did in the garden. Yet, how does one hide from God. The beginning of Holiness is to not try to hide but to face our Lord manfully and admit we are what we are and He is what He is. After this Moses was 100 percent for God; he was His man. Moses here began a journey with God that eventually led to the birth of Christ true God and true man and we beheld him face to face.

Today try and be 100% for God.

As iron, cast into the fire, loses its rust and becomes bright with the flame, so too a man who turns his whole heart to Me is purified and all sluggishness and changed into a new man.[1]

Feast of St. Thomas Aquinas, Priest and Doctor of the Church

Thomas Aquinas thoughts on Fear
Article 1. Whether God can be feared? I answer that, Just as hope has two objects, one of which is the future good itself, that one expects to obtain, while the other is someone's help, through whom one expects to obtain what one hopes for, so, too, fear may have two objects, one of which is the very evil which a man shrinks from, while the other is that from which the evil may come. Accordingly, in the first way God, Who is goodness itself, cannot be an object of fear; but He can be an object of fear in the second way, in so far as there may come to us some evil either from Him or in relation to Him. From Him there comes the evil of punishment, but this is evil not absolutely but relatively, and, absolutely speaking, is a good. Because, since a thing is said to be good through being ordered to an end, while evil implies lack of this order, that which excludes the order to the last end is altogether evil, and such is the evil of fault. On the other hand the evil of punishment is indeed an evil, in so far as it is the privation of some particular good, yet absolutely speaking, it is a good, in so far as it is ordained to the last end. In relation to God the evil of fault can come to us, if we be separated from Him: and in this way God can and ought to be feared.

Article 2. Whether fear is fittingly divided into filial, initial, servile and worldly fear? I answer that, We are speaking of fear now, in so far as it makes us turn, so to speak, to God or away from Him. For, since the object of fear is an evil, sometimes, on account of the evils he fears, man withdraws from God, and this is called human fear; while sometimes, on account of the evils he fears, he turns to God and adheres to Him. This latter evil is twofold, viz. evil of punishment, and evil of fault. Accordingly if a man turn to God and adhere to Him, through fear of punishment, it will be servile fear; but if it be on account of fear of committing a fault, it will be filial fear, for it becomes a child to fear offending its father. If, however, it be on account of both, it will be initial fear, which is between both these fears.

Article 3. Whether worldly fear is always evil? I answer that, moral acts and habits take their name and species from their objects. Now the proper object of the appetite's movement is the final good: so that, in consequence, every appetitive movement is both specified and named from its proper end. For if anyone were to describe covetousness as love of work because men work on account of covetousness, this description would be incorrect, since the covetous man seeks work not as end but as a means: the end that he seeks is wealth, wherefore covetousness is rightly described as the desire or the love of wealth, and this is evil. Accordingly worldly love is, properly speaking; the love whereby a man trusts in the world as his end, so that worldly love is always evil. Now fear is born of love, since man fears the loss of what he loves, as Augustine states. Now worldly fear is that which arises from worldly love as from an evil root, for which reason worldly fear is always evil.

Chinese New Year[2]

Chinese New Year or Spring Festival celebrates a year of hard work and gives people the opportunity to wish for a lucky new year. It is China's most important festival and involves family reunions, elaborate decorations and giving red envelopes. Chinese New Year is based on the Chinese Lunar Calendar and usually falls between January 21 and February 20. In 2017 Chinese New Year is celebrated on January 288th. The Calendar functions on a 12 year animal cycle that many associate with the celebration.

Chinese New Year Facts & Quotes

·         2016 is the Year of the Monkey according to the Chinese animal zodiac cycle. 2017 will be the Year of Rooster or Red Fire Chicken.
·         The names of the Chinese calendar are repeated every 60 years.
·         The Chinese New Year is celebrated as the Spring Festival in China. It is the nation's most important festival.
·         Every child receives a monetary gift for New Year. The gift is wrapped in a red envelope.
·         I wish you happiness that comes from within, the best of luck to keep you pushing and peace in all days of the New Year. - Gong Xi Fa Cai, Popular New Year song

Chinese New Year Top Events and Things to Do

·         Sing a popular Chinese New Year song called Gonf Xi Fa Cai.
·         Clean your he house. It is customary for Chinese to clean their homes in preparation for the New Year and the fresh start.
·         Prepare your red envelopes for the kids. This is considered lucky money for children.
·         Attend a Chinese New Year Festival in a town near you. Most large cities in the US have a Chinatown district that will host events and pageants.
·         Get together with friends and create a long dragon on sticks. One person gets to create the head, and the remainder create the long flowy tail. Remember to use bright colors.







[1] Paone, Anthony J., Our Daily Bread, 1954.


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