Wednesday, April 26, 2017

I sought the LORD, and he answered me and
delivered me from all my fears.

1 Samuel, Chapter 23, Verse 15
While David was in the wilderness of Ziph at Horesh he was afraid that Saul had come out to seek his life.

David trusted his life to God and did what was righteous.

David a.k.a. Robin Hood[1]

·         The Philistines are robbing grain at Keilah, so David and his men go attack them.
·         Even though Saul is after them, David still knows he needs to protect the people for God.
·         After David defeats the Philistines, Saul learns of David's whereabouts (1-8).
·         David learns that Saul is coming for him and he starts freaking out.
·         God informs David that the people will turn him over to Saul this time, which is a hard lesson for David because even though he was acting on the people's behalf, they were willing to stab him in the back (9-13).
·         Even though Saul is unable to find David, Jonathan finds him no problem. BFFs can be like that. Jonathan encourages David to keep fighting the good fight because one day he will be king of Israel as God intends (14-18).
·         Saul learns that David is staying in the wilderness of Ziph with his merry men a la Robin Hood. Saul starts chasing through Ziph and a variety of other areas.
·         Unfortunately for Saul, David is quick as lightning and always avoids danger. At one point, Saul and his men are on one side of a mountain and David and his men are on the other side. Tough luck, Saul.
·         Saul gets word the Philistines are raiding the land. For once, Saul makes a good decision and goes to defend the Israelites against the Philistines (15-29).

We glorify God when we are righteous as he is righteous who makes the rain fall on both the good and the evil.

Roméo Dallaire[2]

John McCain in his book Character is Destiny examined the character traits exemplified by Roméo Dallaire who in 1993, was appointed Force Commander for the United Nations Assistance Mission for Rwanda (UNAMIR), where he witnessed the country descend into chaos and genocide, leading to the deaths of more than 800,000 Rwandans. When the rest of the world looked away, he stayed behind in a manmade evil for the sake of duty and justice. Dallaire was in charge of a small overwhelmed African peacekeeping force, he could have left but he refused and witnessed the genocide. He is ashamed he could have not done more and the reaction of the world that stood by for 100 days doing nothing allowing the devil to reap carnage, terror and hopelessness. Dallaire was the one candle in a darkened room of despair created by the collective failure of mankind’s conscience along with the apathy and deceitfulness of world governments toward Rowanda’s plight. McCain writes of Dallaire dilemma:
The U.S. government, our allies, and the United Nations went to extraordinary and ridiculous lengths to avoid using the term, aware that once genocide was acknowledged, they would have to act. Day after day, long night after long night, for over three months, more men, women, and children were added to the rolls of the victims by their hate-crazed persecutors. Romeo Dallaire soldiered on, saving those he could and agonizing over those he couldn’t, all the while begging the UN, and the world, to send more troops, to do something, anything, to help. In his telling, his mission was to keep peace; peace was destroyed by unimaginable violence, and many thousands died. He failed. He tried to convince his superiors to send him more men. He failed. He tried to get the United States and other powerful countries to listen to their consciences and help. He failed. He tried to persuade the world to stop genocide. He failed. And while many, many people who had a responsibility to stop the killings looked the other way and never had a moment of doubt or a night of troubled sleep, Romeo Dallaire took his failures very, very seriously. A righteous person, no matter how blameless, will always take humanity’s failures personally.

Our Lady of Good Counsel[3]

On the Feast of Saint Mark, April 25 1467, the people of Genazzano, Italy witnessed a marvellous sight. A cloud descended upon an ancient church dedicated to Our Lady of Good Counsel. When the cloud disappeared, an image of Our Lady and the Child Jesus was revealed which had not been there before. The image, on a paper-thin sheet, was suspended miraculously. Soon after the image's appearance many miracles were attributed to the intercession of Our Lady of Good Counsel. Because of this, Pope Paul II ordered an investigation and the results have been preserved. It was later discovered that the very same image had been seen in a church dedicated to the Annunciation in Scutari, Albania. The image in this church was said to have arrived there in a miraculous manner. Now, the image had been transported from Albania miraculously to avoid sacrilege from Moslem invasion. A commission of enquiry determined that a portrait from the church was indeed missing. An empty space the same size as the portrait was displayed for all to see. Many miracles continue to be attributed to Our Lady of Good Counsel. Pope Saint Pius V, for example, credited victory in the Battle of Lepanto to Her intercession. Several Popes have approved the miraculous image. In 1682 Pope Innocent XI had the portrait crowned with gold. On July 2 1753 Pope Benedict XIV approved the Scapular of Our Lady of Good Counsel, and was the first to wear it.

Daily Devotions/Prayers

·         Drops of Christ’s Blood



[1]http://www.shmoop.com/1-samuel/chapter-23-summary.html
[2]McCain, John and Salter, Mark. (2005) Character is destiny. Random House, New York

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