Thursday, May 4, 2017 National Prayer Day

Hear now, all you who fear God,
while I declare what he has done for me.

2 Samuel, Chapter 12, Verse 18
On the seventh day, the child died. David’s servants were afraid to tell him that the child was dead, for they said: “When the child was alive, we spoke to him, but he would not listen to what we said. How can we tell him the child is dead? He may do some harm!”

Even today advisers and courtiers of powerful men and women dread to tell bad news or to tell the unfortunate truth to their leaders. David has fallen by killing Bathsheba’s husband Uriah and the child of their unholy union has died. David and even modern leaders forget the law of sacrifice. The law of the sacrifice is simple: Those leaders who stop seeking new challenges; stop growing, inevitably stop leading. John Maxwell states, “When we stop sacrificing, we stop succeeding.”[1]

If you want to become a great leader, you must be willing to make sacrifices.

1.      There is no success without sacrifice. Every person who has achieved any success in life has made sacrifices to do so.

2.      Leaders are often asked to give up more than others. Leaders have to give up their rights. Leaders need to learn how to put others ahead of themselves. It’s not easy, but you need to give up more than the people you lead.

3.      You must keep giving up, to stay up. John Maxwell takes the Law of Sacrifice even further when he states that ‘If leaders have to give up to go up, then they have to give up even more to stay up’. Today’s success is the greatest thread to tomorrow’s success. There’s always a cost involved in moving forward. The day you stop being willing to pay the price is the day when you stop creating the results you desire.

4.      The higher the level of leadership, the greater the sacrifice. You’ve probably noticed that the higher the position, the fewer the number of people able to step in. It’s not because there’s lack of capable people. It’s simply because there’s not enough people willing to pay the price. From my childhood I remember learning about the utopia of communism – they tried to make everybody equal. Everybody should have the same rights and the same pay. The problem with this is the law of sacrifice. There will always be some who will be willing to sacrifice more, while others will not be willing to do anything extra. No philosophy of equality will ever be able to overcome this mindset. It’s the inner job. You must decide for yourself how much time, effort or other sacrifice you’re going to assign to a specific job, project or task. The Law of Sacrifice states that those who do, will go up. And those who continue doing this, will stay up.[2]



National Day of Prayer[3]

National Day of Prayer is an annual holiday that serves to encourage Americans to pray, meditate and repent. It is also used to draw awareness to prayer and religious beliefs. The origins of National Day of Prayer date back to 1787, when Benjamin Franklin asked President George Washington to open each day with prayer, and to realize that prayer is deeply intertwined in the fabric of the United States.  However, it was not until February 1952 during the Korean War that Reverend Billy Graham petitioned support of Representative Percy Priest to observe a national day of prayer.  On April 17, 1952 President Harry Truman signed a bill proclaiming  National Day of Prayer, to encourage Americans to turn to God in prayer and meditation. National Prayer Day is celebrated every year on the first Thursday of May.

National Day of Prayer Facts & Quotes

·         2016 marks the 65th Anniversary of the National Day of Prayer
·         According to the Pew Research Center's Religious Landscape Study of 2015, 23% of Americans have indicated that they are not part of any religion.  The survey is based on responses of more than 35,000 Americans.
·         On October 3, 2008, The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) sued President George W. Bush and staff to challenge the designation of a National Day of Prayer.  On April 14, 2011, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the National Day of Prayer did not cause harm and a feeling of alienation cannot suffice as injury.
·         According to the Pew Research Center, more than 55% of Americans pray every day.  60% of older Americans are likely to pray every day, compared to 45% of young Americans.
·         In the face of tremendous challenges, prayer is a powerful force for peace, justice, and a brighter, more hopeful tomorrow.  Today, as we join together in fellowship, we seek to see our own reflection in the struggle of others, to be our brothers' and sisters' keepers, and to keep faith -- in one another, in the promise of our Nation, and in the Almighty. - President Barack Obama, May 06, 2015 (Presidential Proclamation -- National Day of Prayer, 2015)
·         Prayer is not asking. It is a longing of the soul. It is daily admission of one's weakness. It is better in prayer to have a heart without words than words without a heart. - Mahatma Gandhi, Civil Rights and Freedom Activist

National Day of Prayer Top Events and Things to Do

·         Attend a religious service at your place of worship on the National Day of Prayer.  If you are not religious, try meditation.
·         Offer a prayer for your loved ones and for those who are serving at the frontlines to protect America.
·         Attend a spiritual retreat that appeals to your beliefs, including meditation and retreats.
·         Practice mindfulness by focusing upon the internal and external experience of each moment of life.  Mindfulness creates awareness and encourages one to be grateful for their blessings.
·         Attend a prayer event on Prayer Day. There are many local events, some religious based, others meditation oriented.






[1][1] John Maxwell, The John Maxwell Leadership Bible
[2] http://silviapencak.com/law-of-sacrifice/

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