Featured Post

Thursday, September 16, 2021

  DAY 33 - MARY, MORNING STAR, PRAY FOR US UNITY IN TRUTH Devil's Tactic #2 - Divide and Conquer  The second modern tactic of the devil ...

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Thursday, July 20, 2017

1 Maccabees, Chapter 16, Verse 6
John and his people took their position against the enemy. Seeing that his people were afraid to cross the wadi, John crossed first. When his men saw this, they crossed over after him.

The narrative is nearing its end. Simon, the last of the Maccabean brothers to rule over the Jewish people, is getting too old to lead the troops into battle. He passes on the military leadership to his sons Judas and John, who like a true leader leads from the front. He is the first to step into danger.[1]

Even in our present day we can see similarities in our own heroes and villains. What should we take away from this book? The contest described in this book is a struggle, not simply between Jew and Gentile, but between those who would uphold the law and those, Jews or Gentiles, who would destroy it. The books severest condemnation goes, not to the Seleucid politicians, but to the lawless apostates from among the Jewish people, adversaries of Judas and his brothers, who are models of faith and loyalty.

Fear binds us[2]

There is so much fear and agony in us. Fear of people, fear of God, and much raw, undefined, free-floating anxiety. I wonder if fear is not our main obstacle to prayer.
When we enter into the presence of God and start to sense that huge reservoir of fear in us, we want to run away into the many distractions that our busy world offers abundantly.
But we should not be afraid of our fears. We can confront them, give words to them, cry out to God, and lead our fears into the presence of the One who says: “Don’t be afraid, it is I.”
(Henri Nouwen, Spiritual Direction, 58)

Hope is to each of us what sunshine is to a garden.

Daily Devotions/Prayers
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         Novena of St. Ann-Day 4





[1]The Collegeville Bible Commentary, 1986.
[2]https://diligentleaves.wordpress.com/2012/06/22/fearless-prayer/

No comments:

Post a Comment