Tuesday, October 31, 2017

ALL HOLLOWS EVE



Proverbs, Chapter 15, Verse 16
Better a little with fear of the LORD than a great fortune with anxiety.

The sages favor wealth over poverty—but not at any price. Wisdom makes poverty not only bearable but even joyful like the joy of feast days.[1]


Halloween or All Hallows' Eve is not a liturgical feast on the Catholic calendar, but the celebration has deep ties to the Liturgical Year. The three consecutive days — Halloween, All Saints Day and All Souls Day — illustrate the Communion of Saints. We, the Church Militant (those on earth, striving to get to heaven) pray for the Church Suffering (those souls in Purgatory) especially on All Souls Day and the month of November. We rejoice and honor the Church Triumphant (the saints, canonized and uncanonized) in heaven. We also ask the Saints' intercession for us. In England, saints or holy people are called "hallowed," hence the name "All Hallow's Day." The evening, or "e'en" before the feast became popularly known as "All Hallows' Eve" or even shorter, "Hallowe'en." Since it was the night before All Saints Day, "All Hallows Eve" (now known as Hallowe'en), was the vigil and required fasting, many recipes and traditions have come down for this evening, such as pancakes, boxty bread and boxty pancakes, barmbrack (Irish fruit bread with hidden charms), colcannon (combination of cabbage and boiled potatoes). This was also known as "Nutcrack Night" in England, where the family gathered around the hearth to enjoy cider and nuts and apples. Halloween is the preparation and combination of the two upcoming feasts. Although the demonic and witchcraft have no place in a Catholic celebration, some macabre can be incorporated into Halloween. It is good to dwell on our certain death, the Poor Souls in Purgatory, and the Sacrament of the Sick. And tied in with this theme is the saints, canonized and non-canonized. What did they do in their lives that they were able to reach heaven? How can we imitate them? How can we, like these saints, prepare our souls for death at any moment?

The Black Mass: A Parody of the Eucharistic Celebration[3]

The black mass is a ceremony during which the consecration to Satan occurs. The black mass is a parody of [the Catholic] Mass, in which one adores and exalts Satan. Usually it is officiated at night, because the darkness permits greater secrecy and usually the night before a great feast of the Holy Catholic Church. The most important is Halloween, which falls on the night between October 31 and November 1 of each year: it is considered the magic New Year. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the extreme danger for our children and youth who participate in the feast of Halloween on that date.


Black Magic: A Grave Sin against the Faith

On this topic the Catechism of the Catholic Church furnishes the best definition: “All practices of magic or sorcery, by which one attempts to tame occult powers, so as to place them at one’s service and have a supernatural power over others — even if this were for the sake of restoring their health — are gravely contrary to the virtue of religion” (no. 2117). The definition of magic tells us two things. Above all, it has ambition — through the utilization of evil spells, the evil eye, charms, magic filters, rituals, invocations, cursed foods and drinks ingested by the victims, crystal balls, et cetera — to modify and foretell the course of human events, and to utilize the preternatural (demoniac) powers to make a person fall in love, be cured of an illness, be dismissed from a job, kill someone, provoke atmospheric events, et cetera. In other words, magic is a practice used to do evil things and to influence people and the reality created by the devil. This is also valid for the rites that are commonly called “white magic” and that are done for the “good” —please do not be charmed. It is not magically delicious.

Terror of Demons[4]


The Lord has countless secrets to reveal to us about Joseph. God wants to instruct us in the ways of Joseph's faith, perseverance, purity and loyalty. The "Litany of Saint Joseph" is an excellent place to begin. The vivid titles convey so much meaning and truth. One of my favorite appellations from the Litany is "Terror of Demons." Satan and his cohort of fallen angels had no success in seducing Joseph. He checked his temper, he refrained from idle speech and he was righteous in his dealings with his neighbors. Because Joseph was close to the compassionate Almighty, he was enabled to overcome the vicious onslaught of Lucifer and his vindictive companions. Those who turn to Saint Joseph for his powerful intercession and good example do much to keep Satan and the other wholly corrupt devils at bay. In this sense, Joseph is the Terror of Demons because when the friends of Jesus avail themselves of his salutary influence, Saint Joseph is for them a sure protection against the oppressive wiles of the Prince of Darkness. There are numerous prayers to Saint Joseph. What follows is the "Consecration to Saint Joseph."

O Blessed Saint Joseph!
I consecrate myself to thy honor, and give myself to thee, that thou mayest be always my father, my protector, and my guide to the way of salvation.
Obtain for me a great purity of heart and a fervent love of the interior life.
After thy example, may I perform all my actions for the greater glory of God, in union with the Divine Heart of Jesus, and the Immaculate Heart of Mary!
And do thou, O Blessed Joseph, pray for me, that I may experience the peace and joy of thy holy death. Amen.
Sweet Heart of Mary, be my salvation!
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, I give you my heart and my soul.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, I love you: save souls!
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, assist me in my last agony.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, may I breathe forth my soul in peace with you. Amen.
With Saint Joseph as our help, we may confidently approach the Risen Lord Jesus Christ through Blessed Mary and realize that our humble efforts--poor as they are--will please our merciful God.
Saint Joseph, Terror of Demons, pray for us!

Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         Fast voluntarily pray the rosary



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