Featured Post

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

2 Maccabees, Chapter 8, Verse 16 Maccabeus assembled his forces, six thousand strong, and exhorted them not to be panic-stricken before...

Friday, January 19, 2018

Saturday, January 20, 2018

January 20 Saturday
FEAST OF ST. SEBASTIAN


Sirach, Chapter 25, Verse 6
The crown of the elderly, wide experience; their glory, the fear of the Lord.

We use to say in the military to the younger troops fresh out of high school that joined the military that beyond showing us normal military courtesy they really should listen and follow what we do because “We survived youth.” The fact is experience is the best teacher and experience teaches us that God is real and the older ones have learned that fear of the Lord is more than a crown of glory it is the key to reaching old age.

One of the most curious phenomenons of our modern society is that by the year 2020 we will have five generations working together: Each with difference values and views of life.
The Johnsons report[1] that each generation has been influenced by the major historical events, social trends, and cultural phenomena of its time. These forces shape ideas about everything from expectations and perceptions about what the workplace will provide and how employees should behave, to company loyalty and work ethic.


Generational characteristics identified After studying generational characteristics of the five major working generations, the Johnsons identified distinct generational characteristics that impact work styles, team behavior, and communication styles. By understanding the differences between generational groups, conflicts can be avoided, they say. The father-daughter team explains generational differences as follows:

Traditionals: Born before 1945, “The Depression Babies.” Influenced by the Great Depression and World War II. Traits: Loyal, respectful of authority, stubbornly independent, excellent work ethic, dependable, and have advanced communication and interpersonal skills.

Baby Boomers: Born 1946-1964, “The Woodstock Generation.” Influenced by the Vietnam War, the ’60s, and postwar social change. Traits: Well-educated, question authority, excellent teamwork skills, and thrive on adrenaline-charged assignments.

Generation X: Born 1965-1980, “The Latchkey Generation.” Products of divorced parents. Traits: Independent, family-focused, intolerant of bureaucracy, critical, hardworking, and socially responsible.

Generation Y: Born 1981-1995. “The Entitled Generation.” Influenced by technology and doting parents. Traits: Highly socialized, loyal, technologically savvy, socially responsible, and require work-life balance.

Linksters: Born after 1995. “The Facebook Crowd.” Influenced by a media-saturated world. Traits: Technologically dependent, closely tied to parents, tolerant of alternative lifestyles, involved in green causes and social activism.

How to resolve intergenerational conflicts How do you work with or manage the different generational group? The Johnsons offer the following six tips:

1.      Understand work styles. Traditionals and baby boomers don’t like to be micromanaged, while Gen Y’ers and linksters crave specific, detailed instructions about how to do things and are used to hovering authorities.
2.      Consider generational values. Each generation is protecting a distinct set of values, and conflict may threaten these values. For example, baby boomers value teamwork, cooperation, and buy-in, while Gen X’ers prefer to make a unilateral decision and move on—preferably solo.
3.      Share perceptions. When employees of two or more generations are involved in a workplace conflict, they can learn a great deal by sharing their perceptions. A traditional may find the lack of formality and manners of a Gen Y’er offensive, while a Gen Y’er may feel “dissed” when this older employee fails to respect his  or her opinions and input.
4.      Find a generationally appropriate fix. You can’t change people’s life experiences, but you can work with the set of workplace attitudes and expectations that result. If there is  a knowledgeable boomer who is frustrated by the lack of experience of a Gen Y’er, coupled with his or her sense of entitlement, turn the boomer into a mentor.
5.      Find commonality. Traditionals and Gen Y employees tend to value security and stability. Traditionals and boomers resist change. But both crave training and development. Gen X and Gen Y employees place a high value on workplace flexibility and work-life balance. Boomers and linksters are most comfortable with diversity and alternative lifestyles. Gen Y and linksters are technologically adept and committed to socially responsible policies.
6.      Learn from each other. Each generation has valuable lessons to teach the next. Traditionals and boomers have a wealth of knowledge and tricks of the trade that younger workers need. Generation X employees are widely known for their fairness and mediation abilities. Generation Y workers are technology wizards. And Linksters hold clues to future workplace, marketing, and business trends.[2]
St. Sebastian[3]

The name of Sebastian is enveloped in a wreath of legends. By birth he was a Milanese. Perhaps the persecutor of Christians had left Milan, or had not yet arrived, or had become momentarily more tolerant. Sebastian believed that here there was no opportunity for combat, or that it had already passed. So he went to Rome, the scene of bitter opposition arising from the Christians' zeal for the faith. There he suffered, there he gained the crown." St. Sebastian was widely venerated during the Middle Ages, particularly as a protector against the plague. Paul the Deacon relates that in 670 a great pestilence at Rome ceased when an altar was dedicated in his honor. The Breviary account of the saint is highly legendary; in part it reads: "Diocletian tried by every means to turn Sebastian from the faith of Christ. After all efforts had proven fruitless, he ordered him tied to a post and pierced with arrows. When everyone thought him dead, a devout woman named Irene arranged for his burial during the night; finding him still alive, she cared for him in her own house. After his recovery he appeared again before Diocletian and boldly rebuked him for his wickedness. Enraged by the saint's sharp words, the emperor ordered him scourged until he expired. (Remember that in our Lords scourging; He paid particularly for the sins of the flesh) His body was thrown into a sewer."

The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity[4]

May we manifest His divinity and His mystical union

Day 3 Your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit

Scripture
·         Exodus 3:4-10, God frees those who are in human bondage.
·         Psalm 24:1-6, Lord, we are the people who seek your face.
·         1 Corinthians 6:9-20, Therefore glorify God in your body.
·         Matthew 18:1-7, Woe to the one by whom the stumbling block comes!

Meditation
The Book of Exodus demonstrates God’s concern for people in human bondage and this concern extends to modern forms of enslavement. While sexuality is a gift of God for human relationships and the expression of intimacy, human beings have a propensity to misuse this gift in ways which enslave and devalue.
As Christians we are called to give glory to God in our own bodies, and to work together for the kind of society that upholds human dignity and does not put a stumbling block before any of God’s little ones.

Prayer
By your heavenly grace, O God, restore us in mind and body. Create in us a clean heart and a pure mind that we may give glory to your name. May the Churches attain unity of purpose for the sanctification of your people, through Jesus Christ who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit for ever and ever. Amen!

Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         Nineveh 90 Day 20
·         Fitness Friday Week 12
·         Nine Days for Life-day 3
·         Please pray for me and this ministry



No comments:

Post a Comment