Wednesday, November 6, 2019


Psalm 3, Verse 7
I do not fear, then, thousands of people arrayed against me on every side.


Psalm three is an individual lament complaining of enemies who deny that God will come to the rescue. Despite such taunts the psalmist hopes for God’s protection even in sleep. The Psalm prays for an end to the enemies’ power to speak maliciously and closes peacefully with an expression of trust.[1]

World Saxophone Day[2]



November 6 is Saxophone Day, an unofficial holiday that celebrates the woodwind instrument popularly used in jazz, classical music, and military ensembles. The day honors saxophonists and commemorates the birth anniversary of its inventor Adolphe Sax. Born in Belgium in 1814, Sax was an instrument maker and musician who designed and introduced the Saxophone in 1840. It was first adopted for use in military bands and soon became a popular instrument played in a concert band and in chamber music. Chamber music is a type of music played by a group of small instruments - ones that usually can fit into a small room or chamber. Today, the Saxophone is used extensively in jazz and other kinds of dance music and in symphony orchestras around the world.


Many Different Types

The Saxophone comes in many different varieties, though most saxophonists usually use one of the four most popular types. These are tenor, baritone, alto, and soprano saxophones. The tenor saxophone is usually used in jazz and rock music bands, while the baritone saxophone tends to be reserved for jazz solos. The Alto Saxophone is easy to play and therefore used to train beginners. The Soprano plays the highest pitch among all saxophones and is also often played in jazz bands. Other saxophones include Mezzo Soprano, Sopranino, Tubax, Bass and Contrabass.


How to Celebrate?

·         Are you a saxophonist? Bring out your instrument and play some music with a band or solo for your family and friends.
·         Attend a chamber music, jazz or symphony orchestra concert. Keep an ear out for the Saxophone notes.
·         If you have always wanted to learn how to play the Saxophone, today is the day to get started.

Have a couple of scotch on the rocks and listen to Kenny G.


Don't forget to pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory from November 1 to the 8th.

Purgatory[3]


Father Gerard, that the custom of having thirty masses said for the dead is also widely spread in Italy and other Christian countries. These Masses are called the Thirty Masses of St. Gregory, because the pious custom seems to trace its origin back to this great Pope. It is thus related in his Dialogues (Book 4, chap. 40): A Religious, named Justus, had received and kept for himself three gold pieces. This was a grievous fault against his vow of poverty. He was discovered and excommunicated. This salutary penalty made him enter into himself, and some time afterwards he died in true sentiments of repentance. Nevertheless, St. Gregory, in order to inspire the brethren with a lively horror of the sin of avarice in a Religious, did not withdraw the sentence of excommunication: Justus was buried apart from the other monks, and the three pieces of money were thrown into the grave, whilst the Religious repeated all together the words of St. Peter to Simon the Magician, Pecunia tua tecum sit in perditionem—“Keep thy money to perish with thee.” Sometime afterwards, the holy Abbot, judging that the scandal was sufficiently repaired, and moved with compassion for the soul of Justus, called the Procurator and said to him sorrowfully, “Ever since the moment of his death, our brother has been tortured in the flames of Purgatory; we must through charity make an effort to deliver him. Go, then, and take care that from this time forward the Holy Sacrifice is offered for thirty days; let not one morning pass without the Victim of Salvation being offered up for his release.” The Procurator obeyed punctually.

Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         54 Day Rosary day 6


[1] http://www.usccb.org/bible/psalms/3
[3]Schouppe S.J., Rev. Fr. F. X.. Purgatory Explained (with Supplemental Reading: What Will Hell Be Like?)



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Monday, March 9, 2020

Saturday, June 27, 2020

Thursday, July 2, 2020

Monday, June 29, 2020

Friday, July 3, 2020

Sunday, June 28, 2020

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Tuesday, June 30, 2020