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Introduction to the book of Haggai[1]

 

Haggai’s words concern conditions in the Persian province of Judah at the beginning of the reign of the Persian king Darius I (522–486 B.C.). The community in Judah is struggling with its identity in light of the loss of its statehood through the demise of the monarchy and the destruction of the Temple. Haggai’s oracles address both these problems. First, the provincial government, despite its subordination to Persian domination, is seen as the legitimate heir to the Davidic monarchy; the governor Zerubbabel, himself a descendant of the Davidic line, and the high priest Joshua together provide political, economic, and religious leadership for the survivors of the Babylonian destruction and the returnees from the Babylonian exile who live together in Judah. Still, the possibility for restoration of Davidic rule is not relinquished but rather is shifted to the future. Second, the Temple’s ruined state is addressed by a rebuilding program. The prophet links the well-being of the community to the work of Temple restoration, and his exhortations to the leaders and the people to begin work on this project are apparently heeded. The brief period of Haggai’s ministry (August to December 520 B.C.) marks the resumption of work on the Temple, the symbol of divine presence among the people.



[1] http://www.usccb.org/bible/scripture.cfm?bk=Haggai&ch=


First Friday

ST. THOMAS-DOG DAYS BEGIN

 Haggai, Chapter 1, verse 12

Then Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, and the high priest Joshua, son of Jehozadak, and all the remnant of the people obeyed the LORD their God, and the words of Haggai the prophet, since the LORD their God had sent him; thus the people FEARED the LORD.


Haggai was a prophet to the Lord during the reign of the Persian King Darius who led the Jews who after the exile feared the Lord; they were the remnant. In today’s world with all its corruption we also are the remnant, let us this day rejoice and obey our Lord in Holy fear, which is Love.


 A joyful heart comes to those who are at peace with themselves, their family and community and the world around them. Those blessed with the peace of Christ let nothing disturb them, nothing frightens them; knowing God never changes. They adhere to the principle of St. Teresa of Avila: Patience obtains all things. Nothing is wanting to him who possesses God. God alone suffices.

 In fact, patience and kindness are the two primary pillars on which Holy love are built.[1]

 I, then, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to live in a manner worthy of the call you have received, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another through love, striving to preserve the unity of the spirit through the bond of peace: one body and one Spirit, as you were also called to the one hope of your call; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all. (Ephesians 4:1-6).

 First Friday[2]

Learn about devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the graces that come from observing First Fridays

It is no wonder, therefore, that our predecessors have constantly defended this most approved form of devotion — the pious devotion of the faithful toward the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus [and] the custom of receiving Holy Communion on the first Friday of every month at the desire of Christ Jesus, a custom which now prevails everywhere.—Pope Pius XI Miserentissimus Redemptor

Whats so special about First Fridays?

Our parents grew up going to church every First Friday of the month and taking part in Sacred Heart devotions, but in recent decades the pious practice has fallen out of practice, and is dismissed by some as an old-fashioned anachronism.

A main reason for the decline in interest in this devotion is probably rooted in simple ignorance: people dont know what First Fridays all are about; families and parishes may not have adequately passed down their importance to the next generation. Here are five things to know.

1. How did the First Friday Devotion begin?

While some saints referenced the Heart of Jesus in their writings even centuries earlier, in 1673, a French Visitandine (Visitation) nun named Margaret Mary Alacoque had visions of Jesus, wherein he asked the Church to honor His Most Sacred Heart. In particular, Jesus asked the faithful to receive Communion on the First Fridays, for nine consecutive months. The request was connected to a specific promise made to all who venerated and promoted devotion to the Sacred Heart. After Margaret Marys death, the First Friday practice steadily spread in the Church endorsed by popes and promoted by saints — but it greatly increased in popularity when Margaret Mary was canonized a saint in 1920 by Pope Benedict XV.

2. Why nine consecutive months?

The number nine is traditionally associated with a novena and finds its origin in the nine days that the apostles spent in prayer before Pentecost. A novena provides an extended amount of time for preparation and interior renewal.

3. What am I supposed to do on First Fridays?

Go to Mass and receive Holy Communion with the intention of honoring Christs Sacred Heart. If you are not in a state of grace, and thus unable to receive, you will also need to go to confession.

4. What are the “promises” connected to this devotion?

Jesus said to St. Margaret Mary, In the excess of the mercy of my heart, I promise you that my all powerful love will grant to all those who will receive communion on the First Fridays, for nine consecutive months, the grace of final repentance: they will not die in my displeasure, nor without receiving the sacraments; and my heart will be their secure refuge in that last hour. This means that if a person faithfully receives communion for nine consecutive months on First Fridays, Jesus will grant that person extra graces at the time of their death, making it possible to repent of their sins and receive the last rites (if needed).

This promise is the last of 12 promises connected to the Devotion to the Sacred Heart, particularly attached to the Enthronement of the Sacred Heart in ones home:

(1) I will give them all the graces necessary in their state of life.

(2) I will establish peace in their homes.

(3) I will comfort them in all their afflictions.

(4) I will be their secure refuge during life, and above all, in death.

(5) I will bestow abundant blessings upon all their undertakings.

(6) Sinners will find in my heart the source and infinite ocean of mercy.

(7) Lukewarm souls shall become fervent.

(8) Fervent souls shall quickly mount to high perfection.

(9) I will bless every place in which an image of my heart is exposed and honored.

10) I will give to priests the gift of touching the most hardened hearts.

(11) Those who shall promote this devotion shall have their names written in my Heart.

(12) I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that my all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on the First Fridays in nine consecutive months the grace of final perseverance; they shall not die in my disgrace, nor without receiving their sacraments. My divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment.

5. Are the First Fridays a “ticket” to heaven?

It is not as simple as going to Mass for nine months and then clocking out, never going to Mass again and leading a sinful life! The entire purpose of this devotion is to draw a person closer to the heart of Christ. If a person fulfills these obligations with sincere faith, it is natural for he or she to be closer to God and better prepared for death. The moment that this devotion is observed in a superstitious manner, neglecting the need to live a virtuous life, all bets are off and Jesus promise is null and void.

Jesus wants us to rest on his heart, like St. John, and the First Friday devotion is an opportunity for us to encounter him more than just on Sundays and to deepen our love of him.

Coming to know, love and trust that we may take rest in the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and place our anxieties within, is what the First Fridays are all about.

Feast of St Thomas[3]

 St. Thomas was one of Jesus' disciples. He is best known for being the one disciple who wanted proof of Jesus' resurrection. St. Thomas is celebrated with a feast day in both the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches. He is often referred to as Doubting Thomas, and also the name The Twin. Many Christians see themselves in St. Thomas because he doubted the resurrection until he received proof from Christ himself. He also confessed to not understanding Jesus when Christ told his disciples at the Last Supper that he was preparing a place for them.

 St Thomas Facts

 ·         An early church text claims that Thomas was the only witness to the Assumption of Mary into heaven.  As her body entered heaven, she dropped her girdle.  Medieval art often depicts Thomas catching the girdle.

·         Thomas didn't believe the apostles when they saw Jesus the first time after the resurrection.  He saw Jesus himself during his second appearance and touched the wounds on his hands and side (John 20:24-29).

·         Church tradition says that Thomas traveled to eastern lands, including Persia, to evangelize to the people there about Jesus.  He is thought to have settled in India.

·         The feast day is held July 3, but sermons the following Sunday may also mention St. Thomas and faith. Originally the feast day for St. Thomas was on Dec. 21, the shortest day of the year.  All sorts of traditions surrounded the day, including serving meat pies and charitable giving.

 St Thomas Top Events and Things to Do

 ·         Read writings by St. Thomas.  Several early church documents bearing Thomas' name are popular, including the Gospel of Thomas, which is a collection of Jesus' sayings.  Other texts include the Acts of Thomas and the Infancy Gospel of Thomas.  None of these texts were included in the Bible.

·         Thousands of Indians claim to be descendants of the Christians that Thomas helped to convert.  Join them on a pilgrimage in Paylador to the traditional spot of Thomas' tomb, Our Lady of Lourdes Cathedral of the Syro-Malabar Archdiocese of Trichur (Kerala, India).

·         If you are a single woman try an ancient custom performed on the Feast of St. Thomas to get an idea who you will marry.  Unmarried Austrian women would climb into bed over a stool, throw their shoes with toes pointing downward toward the bedroom door, and then sleep with their head at the foot of the bed.  Women who performed this ritual were thought to dream about their future husbands.

·         Say a blessing prayer for your property on the feast of St. Thomas.  An ancient custom was for farmers and their sons or hands to drive off evil spirits in preparation for Christmas.  They were sprinkling holy water across the land, while other family members stayed inside and prayed the rosary.

Daily Devotions

·         Offering to the sacred heart of Jesus

·         Drops of Christ’s Blood

·         Iceman’s 40 devotion

·         Universal Man Plan

·         Operation Purity

·         Rosary



[1] Stephen & Alex Kendrick, The Love Dare

[2]https://aleteia.org/2016/04/29/5-things-catholics-should-know-about-first-fridays/


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