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The reason this blog is called "Iceman for Christ" is I was a member of Navel Mobile Construction Battalion that complete construction of the South Pole Station in 1974. At that time there was only one priest in Antarctica and I was asked by him to give the eucharistic to my fellow Catholics at a protestant service celebrated by the Battalion Chaplin on Sundays. At that time only priestly consecrated hands could give the eucharist. There were not eucharist ministers at that time. I was given permission by a letter from the bishop to handled our Lord. Years later I was reading the bible and read "and you shall take me to the ends of the earth." I reflected on it for a second and thought Yes, been there done that. Be not afraid and serve Christ King. Greater is HE; than he who is in the world.

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Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

OURLADY OF MOUNT CARMEL- NATIONAL ICE CREAM DAY

 

Luke, Chapter 1, Verse 50

His mercy is from age to age to those who FEAR him. 

We are to rejoice just as Mary did in her Canticle of Praise when she entered the house of Zechariah.

“My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord; my spirit rejoices in God my savior. For he has looked upon his handmaid’s lowliness; behold, from now on will all ages call me blessed. The Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is from age to age to those who fear him. He has shown might with his arm, dispersed the arrogant of mind and heart. He has thrown down the rulers from their thrones but lifted up the lowly. The hungry he has filled with good things; the rich he has sent away empty. He has helped Israel his servant, remembering his mercy, according to his promise to our fathers, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

I would like to focus on the words from “age to age”. In physics, spacetime (also space–time, space time or space–time continuum) is any mathematical model that combines space and time into a single interwoven continuum.[1] As I understand it what has been done in the past and in the future continues forever rippling through time and space from “age to age”. If this is the case let us follow Mary’s example and develop in ourselves Holy fear through her virtues of: humility, generosity, chastity, patience, self-control and of course love. Happiness is a choice; just as love is. We either decide to be happy or we do not. No amount of money or material things will bring us joy, no amount of pleasure or power either. Mary knew that true happiness comes from God’s mercy. That is a choice too. God’s mercy is given to those who fear Him and then in turn honor the gift of love. We in order to accept the gift of mercy must be open to receive. We make a choice. 

ON KEEPING THE LORD'S DAY HOLY[2]

CHAPTER III

DIES ECCLESIAE

The Eucharistic Assembly:
Heart of Sunday

Easter banquet and fraternal gathering

44. The communal character of the Eucharist emerges in a special way when it is seen as the Easter banquet, in which Christ himself becomes our nourishment. In fact, "for this purpose Christ entrusted to the Church this sacrifice: so that the faithful might share in it, both spiritually, in faith and charity, and sacramentally, in the banquet of Holy Communion. Sharing in the Lord's Supper is always communion with Christ, who offers himself for us in sacrifice to the Father".(72) This is why the Church recommends that the faithful receive communion when they take part in the Eucharist, provided that they are properly disposed and, if aware of grave sin, have received God's pardon in the Sacrament of Reconciliation,(73) in the spirit of what Saint Paul writes to the community at Corinth (cf. 1 Cor 11:27-32). Obviously, the invitation to Eucharistic communion is more insistent in the case of Mass on Sundays and holy days.

It is also important to be ever mindful that communion with Christ is deeply tied to communion with our brothers and sisters. The Sunday Eucharistic gathering is an experience of brotherhood, which the celebration should demonstrate clearly, while ever respecting the nature of the liturgical action. All this will be helped by gestures of welcome and by the tone of prayer, alert to the needs of all in the community. The sign of peace — in the Roman Rite significantly placed before Eucharistic communion — is a particularly expressive gesture which the faithful are invited to make as a manifestation of the People of God's acceptance of all that has been accomplished in the celebration and of the commitment to mutual love which is made in sharing the one bread, with the demanding words of Christ in mind: "If you are offering your gift at the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled with your brother, and then come and offer your gift" (Mt 5:23-24).

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost[3]

"Not everyone who says to Me, 'Lord, Lord’, . . .but he who does the will of my Father. . .shall enter the kingdom of heaven". Not so much what one "says" about the Lord, but how he "does" His "Will," is what brings forth "good fruit". Deeds, not mere words, are acceptable to God, acceptable to neighbor also. Example is the best precept.

The final fruit of sin is "death;" the fruit of "justice" is "life everlasting".

The Holy Eucharist is the "health-giving" Fruit of Calvary, our antidote against the poison-laden Dead-Sea fruit of the world, the flesh and the devil.

"Faith cannot save without virtue" (St. John Chrysostom). 

IN[4] the Introit of the Mass the Church invites us to the praise of God in the following words: “Oh, clap your hands, all ye nations, shout unto God with the voice of joy, for the Lord is most high, He is terrible: He is a great king over all the earth”; (Ps.xlvi. 2, 3).

Prayer. O God, whose providence never faileth in what it doth order, we humbly beseech Thee to put away from us all things hurtful, and to give us all things profitable to us.

EPISTLE. Rom. vi. 19-23.

Brethren: I speak a human thing, because of the infirmity of your flesh: for as you have yielded your members to serve uncleanness and iniquity unto iniquity, so now yield your members to serve justice unto sanctification. For when you were the servants of sin you were free men to justice. What fruit therefore had you then in those things of which you are now ashamed? For the end of them is death. But now being made free from sin, and become servants of God, you have your fruit unto sanctification, and the end life everlasting. For the wages of sin is death, but the grace of God, life everlasting in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Explanation. In these words, St. Paul admonishes the Romans that they ought henceforward to devote themselves as zealously to the service of God as they had hitherto done to that of iniquity, because the service of sin is death, but the service of God is life everlasting. The words “servants, to serve”, denote the full and unconditional subjection of the Christian to God, without walking any longer according to his own will, just as, in regard to the state of sin, they indicate the dominion of the passions over the sinner. There is no requirement more reasonable than that a man should labor as much for God and his own salvation as he has labored for sin and hell. We should, therefore, often think on the wages of sin eternal death; and when we are tempted, ask ourselves, “What shall I gain by my lust, my in justice, my vengeance? Ah, nothing but eternal death! And shall I, created to inherit eternal life, shall I make myself the heir of eternal death?”

GOSPEL. Matt. vii. 15-21.

At that time Jesus said to His disciples: Beware of false prophets, who come to you in the clothing of sheep, but inwardly they are ravening wolves: by their fruits you shall know them. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?

Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit, and the evil tree bringeth forth evil fruit. A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit: neither can an evil tree bring forth good fruit: every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit shall be cut down and shall be cast into the fire. Wherefore by their fruits you shall know them. Not everyone that saith to Me: Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven: but he that doth the will of My Father Who is in heaven, he shall enter into the kingdom of heaven.

Who are meant by false prophets?

1. The world, which promises us honors and riches, but in the end rewards our toil and labor with disgrace and scorn.

2. The flesh, which promises pleasures and joys, but at last leaves nothing but the bitter reproaches of an unquiet conscience.

3. The devil, who promises us a long life, and time for repentance, while the obdurate sinner is cut off suddenly in the midst of his days.

4. All such evil-minded persons as conceal their wicked purpose under the mask of virtue and honesty, until they have entrapped unwary souls, and drawn them into all kinds of shameful misdeeds. It is these false prophets of Satan, and wolves of hell, that make the greatest havoc in the flock of Christ.

Why does Christ say, “every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit shall be cut down and cast into the fire”?

He thereby warns us that faith alone, without good works, or, in other. words, the mere desire for heaven without the practice of virtue, will not save us. Christ says plainly, “Not everyone that saith to Me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven, but he that doth the will of My Father Who is in heaven.” Jesus also saith, “Whosoever shall do the will of My Father Who is in heaven, he is My brother, and sister, and mother; (Matt. xii. 50). Endeavor, therefore, O Christian, to fulfil in all things the will of God.

INSTRUCTION ON GOOD WORKS

 

What are good works?

 

All actions of men which are done according to the will of God, from love of Him, and by the help of grace.

 

Which are the principal good works?

 

Prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. Prayer including all acts belonging to the service of God: fasting, all mortifications of the body; almsgiving, all works of mercy.

 

How many are the works of mercy?

 

Two: corporal and spiritual.

 

Which are the spiritual works of mercy?


 

Those which have for their object the salvation of our neighbor; as,

 

1, to admonish the sinner.

2, to instruct the ignorant.

3, to counsel the doubtful.

4, to comfort the afflicted.

5, to bear wrongs patiently.

6, to forgive injuries and offences.

7, to pray for the living and the dead.

 

Which are the corporal works of mercy?


 

1, To feed the hungry.

2, to give drink to the thirsty.

3, to clothe the naked.

4, to visit the prisoners.

5, to shelter the houseless.

6, to visit the sick.

7, to bury the dead.

 

What is necessary to render works meritorious?

 

1, They must be good in themselves.

2, they must be done by the grace of God.

3, in the state of grace.

4, by free will.

5, with the good intention of pleasing God.

Can we be saved without good works?

No; for Christ says expressly, “Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit shall be cut down and shall be cast into the fire.” And that servant in the Gospel (Matt. xxv. 25) who neither wasted his talent nor yet traded with it, but digged into the earth and hid his lord’s money, was therefore cast into the outer darkness. 

Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel[5] 

THE Church celebrates on this day the feast of the Scapular of Mount Carmel. The scapular, which derives its name from the Latin word scapula’s, meaning shoulders, is a dress which covers the shoulders. It is mentioned in the rule of St. Benedict as worn by monks over their other dress when they were at work, and it now forms a regular part of the religious dress in the old Orders. But it is best known among Catholics as the name of two little pieces of cloth worn out of devotion to the Blessed Virgin over the shoulders, under the ordinary garb, and connected by strings. The devotion of the scapular, now almost universal in the Catholic Church, began with the Carmelites. The history of its origin is as follows: During the thirteenth century the Carmelite Order suffered great persecution, and on July 16, 1251, while St. Simon Stock, then general of the Order, was at prayer, the Blessed Virgin appeared to him, holding in her hand a scapular. Giving it to the saint, she said,” Receive, my dear son, this scapular of thy Order, as the distinctive sign of my confraternity, and the mark of the privilege which I have obtained for thee and the children of Carmel. It is a sign of salvation, a safeguard in danger, and a special pledge of peace and protection till the end of time.” “Whosoever dies wearing this shall be preserved from eternal flames.” It is much to be wished that people should everywhere join this confraternity, for the honor of Mary and for the salvation of souls, by a life fitted to that end. In order to have a share in the merits of the sodality every member must: 

1.      Shun sin, and, according to his state of life, live chastely.

2.      Say every day, if possible, seven times, Our Father, Hail Mary, and Glory Be to the Father.

3.      Strive to serve God by venerating Mary and imitating her virtues. These rules, it is true, are not binding under penalty of sin, but the breach of them deprives us of all merit; and is not this something to be taken into account? “He who soweth sparingly shall also reap sparingly.” (n. Cor. ix. 6). 

Things to Do[6]

·       If you have not already done so, have a priest enroll you in the Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, or popularly known as the "Brown Scapular" and begin wearing it as a sign of your love for Our Lady.

·       Wearing the Brown Scapular is not an automatic guarantee of salvation. It is not a magical charm, nor is it an excuse to live in a way contrary to the teachings of the Church. (see Catechism, no. 1670.)

·       See the Directory on Popular Piety the Brown Scapular is included in the document as a wonderful pious practice. The history of Marian piety also includes "devotion" to various scapulars, the most common of which is devotion to the Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Its use is truly universal and, undoubtedly, it is one of those pious practices which the Council described as "recommended by the Magisterium throughout the centuries."

·       Pope John Paul II has worn the scapular for a long time. See the Holy Father's talk on the Scapular of Carmel, A Treasure for the Church.

·       For the definitive treatment on the brown scapular, read The Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel: Catechesis and Ritual.

·       The Blessed Virgin's scapular should remind us that Christians have an apostolate against current extremes and extravagances in modes of dress. Clothes are a symbol of the person. Like the Christian heart, dress must be chaste and simple, for one judges the interior from the exterior. It should not be necessary to add that special attention be given this matter when preparing for church attendance. Examine yourself on how well you reflect Christian modesty in your dress and if you are a parent, how well you ensure that your children are modestly dressed.

·       In New York City in East Harlem is one of the oldest festivals in America for Our Lady of Mount Carmel. See Our Lady of Mount Carmel Shrine of East Harlem – since 1881. Also Williamsburg in Brooklyn, NY annually holds the Festival of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel and St. Paulinus of Nola (Festa Del Giglio). It is unique to see a scene that one would expect in Europe unfolding on the street of a major East coast city. You can view a You Tube clip right here. Also look around your area for Italian parishes, maybe one named after Our Lady of Mount Carmel? Many times, the parish will host wonderful festivals in her honor.

·       Watch this You Tube video to learn more about devotion to Our Lady of Mt. Carmel.

·       From the Catholic Culture library, the Scapular Devotion, a description of Different Kinds of Scapulars, The Brown Scapular and information on the Scapular Medal.

·       Learn more about St. Simon Stock and the Brown Scapular.

 

Scapulars and Medals[7]

 

Medals have been part of Catholic life since the early centuries of the Church. The most popular is the cross; even Protestants wear crosses minus the corpus while Catholics wear a crucifix. It is also noted that in the miraculous image of Our Lady of Guadalupe she is wearing a cross about her neck. We wear scapulars, too, which are mini habits of the religious orders. Pope John Paul II said that the scapular is a powerful precisely because it is a “habit” in every sense of the word, both a uniform and a pattern of good belief and good behavior. Since 1910, Catholics have been permitted to wear a scapular medal in place of a cloth scapular.

Mount Carmel Coffee[8]

This coffee ice is cool and refreshing for this summer feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.

DIRECTIONS

Stir the sugar into the warm water until it is melted and add the lemon juice, stirring for about five minutes. Add the coffee, strain, place in a freezing tray, and freeze, stirring frequently, until it becomes a mush.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3/4 cup sugar 
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 2 cups strong coffee

Serve the ice slush in glasses, topping the glasses of ice with any of the following:

  • whipped cream (add vanilla, sugar, almond extract, etc.)
  • liqueurs (Amaretto, Kahlua, Baileys, etc.)
  • chocolate curls or small pieces
  • candied citrus peel

 

National Ice Cream Day[9]



National Ice Cream Day is dedicated to appreciating ice cream.  In 1984, Senator Walter Dee Huddleston of Kentucky initiated a joint resolution to declare July as the National Ice Cream Month and July 15 as National Ice Cream Day.  On July 9, 1984, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed July 1984 as the National Ice Cream Month and July 15, 1984 as the National Ice Cream Day. This holiday is now celebrated on the third Sunday of July.  


According to the International Dairy Foods Association, the origins of ice cream date back to the second century B.C., when several prominent historical figures such as Alexander the Great, King Soloman and Nero Claudius Caesar enjoyed consuming iced beverages and snow. As the centuries passed, the snow and ice were refined into cream ice and eventually, in 1777, ice cream was first advertised in New York. However, ice cream was a rare deli––cacy for the elite until 1800s when ice houses were built. Since then, it has become a staple dessert for the American people.

National Ice Cream Day Facts & Quotes

·       During the summer of 1790, President George Washington spent $200 on ice cream.  Meanwhile, according to Thomas Berry of Duke University, the price of 1 pound of coffee was $0.50 in 1788.

·       10% of milk in the US goes towards making ice cream.

·       During World War II, ice cream was served to troops to boost morale while sanctions and rationing was in effect for the general public.  When the war ended, rationing of ice cream was lifted and Americans celebrated victory with a cold, creamy treat. In fact, each American consumed more than 20 quarts of ice cream in 1946.

·       In 2014, 872 million gallons of ice cream were produced in the United States.  The average American annually consumes 22 pounds of ice cream.

·       Ice cream is a nutritious and wholesome food, enjoyed by over ninety percent of the people in the United States. It enjoys a reputation as the perfect dessert and snack food. Over eight hundred and eighty-seven million gallons of ice cream were consumed in the United States in 1983. - President Ronald Reagan, Proclamation 5219 - National Ice Cream Month and National Ice Cream Day, 1984

National Ice Cream Day Top Events and Things to Do

·       Enjoy ice cream with your family and friends.

·       Get free or discounted ice cream.  Most ice cream shops giveaway free ice cream or offer special discounts on National Ice Cream Day.

·       Make President Thomas Jefferson's favorite vanilla ice cream.  The recipe believed to have been handwritten by Jefferson is archived at the Library of Congress.

·       Liven up your ice cream by getting some healthy toppings.  Our favorites:
-Chopped Walnuts
-Fresh Berries
-Raw Cacao nibs
-Goji Berries
-Frozen chopped banana
-Granola
-Unsweetened shredded Coconut

·       Try a non-dairy alternative to milk-based ice cream products.  Whether it is for dietary choices or lactose-intolerance, there are a variety of non-dairy frozen desserts made from soymilk, coconut milk, almond milk, cashew milk and rice milk.  Here are some non-dairy frozen desserts to try:
- Rice Dream Organic Vanilla
- Luna & Larry’s Organic Coconut Bliss Chocolate Chip Cookie
- Ben & Jerry’s Chunky Monkey
- So Delicious Dairy Free Cashew Milk in Salted Caramel Cluster flavor
- Nada Moo Gotta Do Chocolate Ice Cream
- So Delicious Almond Milk Chocolate Ice Cream

 

Catechism of the Catholic Church

PART ONE: THE PROFESSION OF FAITH

SECTION TWO-I. THE CREEDS

CHAPTER TWO

I BELIEVE IN JESUS CHRIST, THE ONLY SON OF GOD

Article 6-"HE ASCENDED INTO HEAVEN AND IS SEATED AT THE RIGHT HAND OF THE FATHER"

659 "So then the Lord Jesus, after he had spoken to them, was taken up into heaven, and sat down at the right hand of God." Christ's body was glorified at the moment of his Resurrection, as proved by the new and supernatural properties it subsequently and permanently enjoys. But during the forty days when he eats and drinks familiarly with his disciples and teaches them about the kingdom, his glory remains veiled under the appearance of ordinary humanity. Jesus' final apparition ends with the irreversible entry of his humanity into divine glory, symbolized by the cloud and by heaven, where he is seated from that time forward at God's right hand. Only in a wholly exceptional and unique way would Jesus show himself to Paul "as to one untimely born", in a last apparition that established him as an apostle.

660 The veiled character of the glory of the Risen One during this time is intimated in his mysterious words to Mary Magdalene: "I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brethren and say to them, I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God." This indicates a difference in manifestation between the glory of the risen Christ and that of the Christ exalted to the Father's right hand, a transition marked by the historical and transcendent event of the Ascension.

661 This final stage stays closely linked to the first, that is, to his descent from heaven in the Incarnation. Only the one who "came from the Father" can return to the Father: Christ Jesus. "No one has ascended into heaven but he who descended from heaven, the Son of man." Left to its own natural powers humanity does not have access to the "Father's house", to God's life and happiness. Only Christ can open to man such access that we, his members, might have confidence that we too shall go where he, our Head and our Source, has preceded us.

662 "and I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men to myself." The lifting up of Jesus on the cross signifies and announces his lifting up by his Ascension into heaven, and indeed begins it. Jesus Christ, the one priest of the new and eternal Covenant, "entered, not into a sanctuary made by human hands. . . but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God on our behalf." There Christ permanently exercises his priesthood, for he "always lives to make intercession" for "those who draw near to God through him". As "high priest of the good things to come" he is the centre and the principal actor of the liturgy that honours the Father in heaven.

663 Henceforth Christ is seated at the right hand of the Father: "By 'the Father's right hand' we understand the glory and honour of divinity, where he who exists as Son of God before all ages, indeed as God, of one being with the Father, is seated bodily after he became incarnate and his flesh was glorified."

664 Being seated at the Father's right hand signifies the inauguration of the Messiah's kingdom, the fulfilment of the prophet Daniel's vision concerning the Son of man: "To him was given dominion and glory and kingdom, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve him; his dominion is an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass away, and his kingdom one that shall not be destroyed." After this event the apostles became witnesses of the "kingdom [that] will have no end".

Daily Devotions

·       Today in honor of the Holy Trinity do the Divine Office giving your day to God. To honor God REST: no shopping after 6 pm Saturday till Monday. Don’t forget the internet.

·       Unite in the work of the Porters of St. Joseph by joining them in fasting: For the Poor and Suffering

·       Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus

·       Offering to the sacred heart of Jesus

·       Let Freedom Ring Day 10

·       Drops of Christ’s Blood

·       Universal Man Plan

·       Rosary

 



[3]My Sunday Missal, Confraternity of the Precious Blood

[4]Goffine’s Devout Instructions, 1896

[5] Goffine’s Devout Instructions, 1896

[7] Hahn, Scott, Signs of Life; 40 Catholic Customs and their biblical roots. Chap. 36 Scapulars and Medals.

[8]https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/recipes/view.cfm?id=91









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