Monday, November 6, 2023

 Monday Night at the Movies

Alejandro Monteverde, Bella, 2006. 



1 Maccabees, Chapter 12, Verse 52

Thus, all Jonathan’s men came safely into the land of Judah. They mourned Jonathan and those who were with him. They were in great FEAR, and all Israel fell into deep mourning.

 

“All the nations round about sought to crush them. They said, “Now that they have no leader or helper, let us make war on them and wipe out their memory from the earth.”

 

This is true if you are sheep, and you look to the leadership of man to save you. To a true Israelite their leader was Yahweh. Israel knew that if they followed His covenant, He would never abandon them. All true leadership comes from God.

 

A True Leader[1]

 

Jesus summoned the twelve and said to them, “You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.” 

Mark 10:42–44

This is certainly easier said than done.  This passage reveals one serious temptation that those “who are recognized as rulers” may fall into.  This is the temptation of an abuse of power and a lack of humble leadership.

For example, tradition states that at the heart of the fall of lucifer and the demons was a desire for power.  “I will not serve” are the words attributed to lucifer.  In other words, the desire for power and to be served by others was real and very powerful for these fallen angels.  So, it is with each one of us.

Though we may not be in a position of great power over others, we will most likely all struggle with the desire for power.  This can happen in just about any context.  Take, for example, a friendship.  Very often when there is the slightest disagreement on something, we want our own way.  We want to be in charge.  Or take the example of home life.  How many enter into family life with a desire to serve the others and to humbly submit to the others’ wills?  This is hard to do.  It’s much easier to want to be the boss and to dictate to others what is to happen in this or that situation.

In the passage above, Jesus makes it clear to His Apostles that when they exercise their “authority” over others they are not to make it “felt” by others.  In other words, Jesus was not calling His Apostles to be leaders by brute force, intimidation, manipulation or by any other severe exercise of their authority.  The authority that Jesus wanted was much different.

Christian authority is centered in love and humility.  It’s a “leadership” that is lived in true humility.  This leadership wins over hearts, minds and wills of others and invites them to follow in charity and love.  This must happen within the family, among friends, at church and within society.

Reflect, today, upon how you lead others.  Do you expect to be the “boss” and expect others to follow you because of your authority?  Or do you lead others by humility and love drawing them to Christ through your goodness?  Commit yourself to Christian leadership as Jesus intended and you will be amazed at the effect it has within your family, among friends and within the larger community.

Lord, help me to be a humble leader.  Help me to let Your heart of love and mercy shine forth and to lead by the goodness and kindness of Your merciful heart.  Help me to set aside all pride and egotism and to become a servant of all.  Jesus, I trust in You.

Purgatory[2]



Father Gerard, that the custom of having thirty masses said for the dead is also widely spread in Italy and other Christian countries. These Masses are called the Thirty Masses of St. Gregory, because the pious custom seems to trace its origin back to this great Pope. It is thus related in his Dialogues (Book 4, chap. 40): A Religious, named Justus, had received and kept for himself three gold pieces. This was a grievous fault against his vow of poverty. He was discovered and excommunicated. This salutary penalty made him enter into himself, and some time afterwards he died in true sentiments of repentance. Nevertheless, St. Gregory, in order to inspire the brethren with a lively horror of the sin of avarice in a Religious, did not withdraw the sentence of excommunication: Justus was buried apart from the other monks, and the three pieces of money were thrown into the grave, whilst the Religious repeated all together the words of St. Peter to Simon the Magician, Pecunia tua tecum sit in perditionem—“Keep thy money to perish with thee.” Sometime afterwards, the holy Abbot, judging that the scandal was sufficiently repaired, and moved with compassion for the soul of Justus, called the Procurator and said to him sorrowfully, “Ever since the moment of his death, our brother has been tortured in the flames of Purgatory; we must through charity make an effort to deliver him. Go, then, and take care that from this time forward the Holy Sacrifice is offered for thirty days; let not one morning pass without the Victim of Salvation being offered up for his release.” The Procurator obeyed punctually. The thirty Masses were celebrated in the course of thirty days. When the thirtieth day arrived and the thirtieth Mass was ended, the deceased appeared to a brother named Copiosus, saying, “Bless God, my dear brother, today I am delivered and admitted into the society of the saints.” Since that time the pious custom of celebrating thirty Masses for the dead has been established.

A Guide to Plenary Indulgences for the All Souls' "Octave", November 1-8

Visiting a Cemetery: An indulgence, applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory, is granted to the faithful, who devoutly visit a cemetery and pray, even if only mentally, for the departed. The indulgence is plenary each day from November 1-8; on other days of the year it is a partial indulgence.


Visiting a Church on November 2: A plenary indulgence, applicable only to the souls in purgatory, is granted to the faithful who, on All Souls' Day (or, according to the judgment of the ordinary, on the Sunday preceding or following it, or on the solemnity of All Saints), devoutly visit a church or an oratory and recite an Our Father and the Creed.


Praying for the Faithful Departed: A partial indulgence, applicable only to the souls in purgatory, is granted to the faithful who,

  • devoutly visit a cemetery and at least mentally pray for the dead;
  • devoutly recite lauds or vespers from the Office of the Dead or the prayer Eternal rest. (Manual of Indulgences, fourth edition, 1999)

Indulgence Requirements:

  • To gain a plenary indulgence, in addition to excluding all attachment to sin, even venial sin, it is necessary to perform the indulgent work and fulfill the following three conditions: sacramental Confession, Eucharistic Communion, and prayer for the intention of the Sovereign Pontiff.
  • A single sacramental confession suffices for gaining several plenary indulgences, but Holy Communion must be received and prayer for the intention of the Holy Father must be recited for the gaining of each plenary indulgence.
  • The three conditions may be fulfilled several days before or after the performance of the prescribed work; it is, however, fitting that Communion be received and the prayer for the intention of the Holy Father be said on the same day the work is performed.
  • The condition of praying for the intention of the Holy Father is fully satisfied by reciting one Our Father and one Hail Mary. A plenary indulgence can be acquired only once in the course of the day, a partial indulgence can be acquired multiple times.
  • If a visit to a Church or an oratory is required to obtain an indulgence attached to a particular day, this may be accomplished from noon of the preceding day until midnight of the particular day.

Manual of Indulgences, fourth edition, 1999 (Enchridion Indulgentarium)

 

Catechism of the Catholic Church

PART TWO: THE CELEBRATION OF THE CHRISTIAN MYSTERY

SECTION TWO-THE SEVEN SACRAMENTS OF THE CHURCH

CHAPTER TWO-THE SACRAMENTS OF HEALING

Article 5 THE ANOINTING OF THE SICK

IN BRIEF

1526 "Is any among you sick? Let him call for the presbyters of the Church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord; and the prayer of faith will save the sick man, and the Lord will raise him up; and if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven" (Jas 5:14-15).

1527 The sacrament of Anointing of the Sick has as its purpose the conferral of a special grace on the Christian experiencing the difficulties inherent in the condition of grave illness or old age.

1528 The proper time for receiving this holy anointing has certainly arrived when the believer begins to be in danger of death because of illness or old age.

1529 Each time a Christian falls seriously ill, he may receive the Anointing of the Sick, and also when, after he has received it, the illness worsens.

1530 Only priests (presbyters and bishops) can give the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, using oil blessed by the bishop, or if necessary by the celebrating presbyter himself.

1531 The celebration of the Anointing of the Sick consists essentially in the anointing of the forehead and hands of the sick person (in the Roman Rite) or of other parts of the body (in the Eastern rite), the anointing being accompanied by the liturgical prayer of the celebrant asking for the special grace of this sacrament.

1532 The special grace of the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick has as its effects:
- the uniting of the sick person to the passion of Christ, for his own good and that of the whole Church;
- the strengthening, peace, and courage to endure in a Christian manner the sufferings of illness or old age;
- the forgiveness of sins, if the sick person was not able to obtain it through the sacrament of Penance;
- the restoration of health, if it is conducive to the salvation of his soul;
- the preparation for passing over to eternal life.

World Saxophone Day[3]

November 6 is Saxophone Day, an unofficial holiday that celebrates the woodwind instrument popularly used in jazz, classical music, and military ensembles. The day honors saxophonists and commemorates the birth anniversary of its inventor Adolphe Sax. Born in Belgium in 1814, Sax was an instrument maker and musician who designed and introduced the Saxophone in 1840. It was first adopted for use in military bands and soon became a popular instrument played in a concert band and in chamber music. Chamber music is a type of music played by a group of small instruments - ones that usually can fit into a small room or chamber. Today, the Saxophone is used extensively in jazz and other kinds of dance music and in symphony orchestras around the world.

Many Different Types

The Saxophone comes in many different varieties, though most saxophonists usually use one of the four most popular types. These are tenor, baritone, alto, and soprano saxophones. The tenor saxophone is usually used in jazz and rock music bands, while the baritone saxophone tends to be reserved for jazz solos. The Alto Saxophone is easy to play and therefore used to train beginners. The Soprano plays the highest pitch among all saxophones and is also often played in jazz bands. Other saxophones include Mezzo Soprano, Sopranino, Tubax, Bass and Contrabass.

How to Celebrate?

·         Are you a saxophonist? Bring out your instrument and play some music with a band or solo for your family and friends.

·         Attend a chamber music, jazz or symphony orchestra concert. Keep an ear out for the Saxophone notes.

·         If you have always wanted to learn how to play the Saxophone, today is the day to get started.

Have a couple of scotch on the rocks and listen to Kenny G.



Don't forget to pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory from November 1 to the 8th.




November 6-12 San Diego Bay Wine + Food Festival


Notoriously passionate wine and food lovers descend on Southern California each November for the region’s largest festival of its kind. How notorious are we talking? Well, let’s just say any festival that lures some of the best national chefs, local culinary stars, and celebrated winemakers and brewmasters means serious gastronomic pleasure is in order

Daily Devotions

·         Unite yourself in the work of the Porters of St. Joseph by joining them in fasting: Today's Fast: Authentic Feminism

·         Eat waffles and Pray for the assistance of the Angels

·         Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus

·         Offering to the sacred heart of Jesus

·         Monday: Litany of Humility

·         Resurrection of the body

·         Drops of Christ’s Blood

·         Universal Man Plan

·         Rosary

 



[2]Schouppe S.J., Rev. Fr. F. X.. Purgatory Explained (with Supplemental Reading: What Will Hell Be Like?)








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