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 Make a Depression Meal today with hotdogs Saints, Feast, Family - Traditions passed down with Cooking, Crafting, & Caring  - July 17 ...

Friday, July 12, 2024

 


July 12 

Saint of the day:

Saint Veronica

Patron Saint of the images; laundry workers, pictures, photos, photographers

NIC’s Corner-What was the Physicality of Christ like?

Here is what I got from Co-pilot:

In the tapestry of Jesus Christ’s life, His teachings, miracles, and spiritual legacy are threads that have woven a history-changing narrative. Yet, among these divine aspects, the humble profession of carpentry attributed to Jesus during His time on Earth offers a unique perspective on His human experience.

 

According to biblical references, Jesus was indeed a carpenter. Mark 6:3 explicitly asks, “Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? And are not his sisters here with us?” This direct association with carpentry provides a rare glimpse into Jesus’s day-to-day life before His public ministry began.[1]

 

Carpentry during Jesus’s era in Galilee demanded skill and an intimate knowledge of materials like wood and possibly stone. Being referred to as a carpenter underscores Jesus’s integration into the socio-economic fabric of His time, reflecting both humility and the inherent dignity of labor. Symbolically, the profession of carpentry resonates with themes of construction and restoration, mirroring Jesus’s mission to rebuild and renew the spiritual lives of those He encountered.

 

The term “tekton,” used in the original Greek scriptures to describe Jesus, broadly translates to “craftsman” or “builder,” suggesting He may have worked with both wood and stone. This interpretation aligns with the architectural practices of His region and time, presenting a broader view of Jesus’s craftsmanship abilities.

 

While the New Testament does not specify when Jesus began His carpentry apprenticeship, historical and cultural contexts suggest it would likely have been in His early teens. This initiation into carpentry marked the start of many years dedicated to learning and practicing the trade, paralleling the journey of many young men in ancient Jewish society.

 

Traditionally, Joseph, Jesus’s earthly father, is believed to have been His mentor in carpentry. This familial apprenticeship would have seen Jesus learning the trade hands-on from Joseph, in line with the era’s traditions of vocational inheritance.

 

In summary, Jesus’s occupation as a carpenter reflects His humble upbringing and choice to live a simple life, working with His hands. Carpentry represents humility, hard work, and the importance of shaping our lives with love and compassion.[2]

 

·         Let Freedom Ring Day 6 Freedom from Envy


Understanding and Managing Envy in Modern Life[3]

Envy is a universal emotion. Virtually every discovered civilization—past and present—contains artifacts that record its presence through human history, permeating virtually every aspect of our lives. From ancient scriptures to modern social media feeds, the narrative of envy has evolved, yet its core remains unchanged: it is the discomfort and longing provoked by others' possessions or successes. This post delves into the multifaceted nature of envy. Beginning with an exploration of envy in Greek and Biblical sources, we turn to examine how it is an emotion of utmost social importance—relating to how we find ourselves within our own tribes. We then turn to modern, psychoanalytic understandings of envy before discussing ways to remedy its often-corrosive effects on our mental health.

He restores my soul. He guides me along right paths for the sake of his name. Psalm 23:3


ST. VERONICA-National French Fry Day

 

Deuteronomy, Chapter 28, Verse 10

All the peoples of the earth will see that the name of the LORD is proclaimed over you, and they will be AFRAID of you.

 

Christ death on the cross was the fulfillment of the proclaiming of God’s name to all the peoples of the world; for over His head was placed a notice: King of the Jews.

 

It is thought-provoking to contemplate that Pilates notice was printed in three languages Hebrew, Latin and Greek. These three cultures in a sense represented the characteristics of God.

 

·         The Hebrew’s were Gods people and represented the good of man and brought the idea that the person was created by God and is more valuable than the universe. 


 

·         Latin, the language of the Romans, brought the idea that truth is the highest value.


 

·         Greeks culture brought the idea of beauty being the greatest value. In Christ’s death is represented all three values.


 That a good God died for man; true to the end; and His shame was turned by love to beauty.

 The Archangels Michael, Gabriel and Raphael, also represent these three values Michael the truth that angels and men are willing to fight for: Raphael the good and Gabriel the beauty. On further reflection I can see these same three attributes reflected the preamble of the US constitution: Life (good); Liberty (truth); and pursuit of happiness (beauty).

 

We can also recognize that the Name of God which is goodness; truth and beauty is feared by evil men and women when they are inspired by Satan and the demons to take away our life, liberty or our pursuit of happiness.

 

Surely, it is time for Christians to "rise from sleep," and to offer vigorous resistance to the enemies of salvation. The weapons in this conflict are not the arms of civil warfare, but the spiritual weapons of prayer and penance, increased fidelity to the Commandments of God, and frequent reception of the Sacraments. And surely, we can choose no better leader in this conflict than the powerful captain who led the faithful Angels to victory.

 

Let us, then, with confident trust, invoke the aid and the protection of this mighty Archangel whose shield bears the inscription:

 

"Michael----Quis ut Deus----Who is like unto God?"[1]

 

 St. Veronica[2]

According to Tradition, when St. Veronica saw Jesus’ fall beneath the weight of the cross, He carried to his pending crucifixion, she was so moved with pity she pushed through the crowd past the Roman Soldiers to reach Jesus. She used her veil to wipe the blood and sweat from His face. The soldiers forced her away from Jesus even as He peered at her with gratitude. She bundled her veil and did not look at it again until she returned home. When she finally unfolded the veil--history does not clarify exactly what kind of material the veil was made from--it was imprinted with an image of Christ's face. Some stories have alluded to St. Veronica being present at the beheading of St. John the Baptist. Others claim Veronica (Bernice) was a woman whom Jesus cured from a blood issue before His arrest in Jerusalem. There is no reference to the biography of St. Veronica in the canonical Gospels. Her act of kindness and charity is represented in the Sixth of the Fourteen Stations of the Cross. St. Veronica is believed to be buried in the tomb in Soulac or in the church of St. Seurin at Bordeaux, France. Her veil (the Veronica) is kept at St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican at Rome

Simplicity Day[3]

” In character, in manner, in style, in all things, the supreme excellence is simplicity.”

~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

We live in a complicated world; with taxes and devices and every imaginable complication the world can provide. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could just take some time to keep things simple? To winnow life down to the bare essentials and hold onto it like the precious thing it is? Simplicity Day encourages you to do just that, to let go of all of life’s complications and live a day… simple. Simplicity Day was born out of a need to be free from the complications of the world and to allow ourselves to just be simple. Celebrate life through simplicity by turning off your devices, getting rid of complicated things and just let life be about living for a day. One of the great conundrums of the modern world is that the more opportunities and options you have the less happy you’re going to be. Some of the happiest people in the world have been determined to be those who live in uncivilized areas concerning themselves only with what they’re going to eat that day and where a good place to sleep is. We can learn much from them, though few of us would want to go to such extremes. However, we can all benefit from just cutting out the things that make our lives difficult. Simplicity Day is about getting rid of these complications and culling from your life what doesn’t bring you joy.

How to Celebrate Simplicity Day

·         Step away from the computer and find a sunny nook with a cup of tea and a book to pass the time.

·         Walk in the forests or through fields and just feel the sun on your skin and the sounds of birds and insects. These moments will be the ones that can truly set you free. During these long moments take the time to relax and consider how you want to proceed in your life.

·         What can you cut out that buries you under complications that bring no benefits? Are there people or things you can remove that will make your life a little happier each day by the removal of these complications?

·         These questions can lead you to a simpler, happier life. Wouldn’t it be nice to have peace of mind? Simplicity Day can lead the way.

 

Catechism of the Catholic Church

PART ONE: THE PROFESSION OF FAITH

SECTION TWO-I. THE CREEDS

CHAPTER ONE-I BELIEVE IN GOD THE FATHER

                                                Day 28

198 Our profession of faith begins with God, for God is the First and the Last, The beginning and the end of everything. the Credo begins with God the Father, for the Father is the first divine person of the Most Holy Trinity; our Creed begins with the creation of heaven and earth, for creation is the beginning and the foundation of all God's works.

Article 1-"I BELIEVE IN GOD THE FATHER ALMIGHTY, CREATOR OF HEAVEN AND EARTH"

Paragraph 1. I BELIEVE IN GOD

199 "I believe in God": this first affirmation of the Apostles' Creed is also the most fundamental. the whole Creed speaks of God, and when it also speaks of man and of the world it does so in relation to God. The other articles of the Creed all depend on the first, just as the remaining Commandments make the first explicit. the other articles help us to know God better as he revealed himself progressively to men. "The faithful first profess their belief in God."

I. "I BELIEVE IN ONE GOD"

200 These are the words with which the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed begins. the confession of God's oneness, which has its roots in the divine revelation of the Old Covenant, is inseparable from the profession of God's existence and is equally fundamental. God is unique; there is only one God: "The Christian faith confesses that God is one in nature, substance and essence."

201 To Israel, his chosen, God revealed himself as the only One: "Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God is one LORD; and you shall love the LORD your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might." Through the prophets, God calls Israel and all nations to turn to him, the one and only God: "Turn to me and be saved, all the ends of the earth! For I am God, and there is no other.. . To me every knee shall bow, every tongue shall swear. 'Only in the LORD, it shall be said of me, are righteousness and strength.'"

202 Jesus himself affirms that God is "the one Lord" whom you must love "with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength". At the same time Jesus gives us to understand that he himself is "the Lord". To confess that Jesus is Lord is distinctive of Christian faith. This is not contrary to belief in the One God. Nor does believing in the Holy Spirit as "Lord and giver of life" introduce any division into the One God:

We firmly believe and confess without reservation that there is only one true God, eternal infinite (immensus) and unchangeable, incomprehensible, almighty and ineffable, the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit; three persons indeed, but one essence, substance or nature entirely simple.

II. GOD REVEALS HIS NAME

203 God revealed himself to his people Israel by making his name known to them. A name expresses a person's essence and identity and the meaning of this person's life. God has a name; he is not an anonymous force. To disclose one's name is to make oneself known to others; in a way it is to hand oneself over by becoming accessible, capable of being known more intimately and addressed personally.

204 God revealed himself progressively and under different names to his people, but the revelation that proved to be the fundamental one for both the Old and the New Covenants was the revelation of the divine name to Moses in the theophany of the burning bush, on the threshold of the Exodus and of the covenant on Sinai.

It Is Better to Fry in This Life Then the Next

National French Fry Day[4]

Whether you call them French Fries, Chips, Finger Chips, or French-Fried Potatoes, this delicious treat is loved around the world, and French Fries Day celebrates them. Not to be confused with the American Chips, which are thinly sliced pieces of potato fried until crisp, French Fries are the delicious result of batons of potato cut to various thicknesses and then fried in oil. The outside of this staple companion food to hamburgers and other grease-ball favorites generally have a golden texture, varying from soft to crispy, and most often served with little more than a dusting of salt.

History of the French Fry

French Fries are one of many foods whose name is most misleading, as the origins of this fat fried food seem to be in Belgium. The story of their creation can be found in a family manuscript dated 1781, which reveals that potatoes were originally cut into the shape of fish and served in lieu of the fish normally caught in a series of small villages in Belgium. It seems the river had frozen over and the fish they normally caught and fried were unable to be caught. Why theyre called French is often attributed to troops coming over during World War I who got their hands-on Belgian Fries. The official language of the Belgian army at that time was French, and as a result the men thought they were in France rather than Belgium. Interestingly, in that region of the world, they are still called Flemish Fries to further complicate matters. Now these treats are loved the world round, even becoming the national snack’ of the Netherlands.

How to Celebrate French Fries Day

With the popularity of French Fry, its not surprising that the world has come up with as many different varieties of this delicious food as you could imagine. So, one of the best ways to celebrate French Fries Day is to host a party dedicated to celebrating the international menu the fried potato has created. The simplest variation is simply to put chopped raw onions in some ketchup and eat them up like they do in the Netherlands. For the more adventurous, try some of the varieties below!

Canadian Poutine

This recipe is a classic way to have French Fries, originating in Canada. This dish is incredibly decadent, combining the crispy soft texture of the French Fries with a rich beef gravy, and topped with cheese curds.

American Bacon Cheeseburger Classic

There is little Americans love more than to add cheese and bacon to just about anything. French fries are no exception, there is little that is as well-loved as a rich, greasy accompaniment to any meal. To make this classic you start with a basic of fries, and layer on bacon, chopped onions, cheese, and ground hamburger before tossing them in the oven just long enough for everything to get melty. Then grab a handful and dig in!

Greek French Fries


The Mediterranean rarely fail at making an already delicious food rich and full of the smells of home. If you love the classic Greek flavors of parmigiano-reggiano or romano cheese, garlic, and oregano, then these fries are going to leave you smiling. The key ingredients here are Extra Virgin Olive Oil to fry them in, after which you toss them in garlic salt, Greek Oregano, and your choice of cheese such as those mentioned ahead. To get the full impact youre going to want to stick to the white crumbly cheese of the region, the truly adventurous might use Mazithra cheese.

These are a few dishes that can help enhance French Fries Day, and really bring out the amazing versatility of this centuries old treat. So, get out your deep fryer, chop up some potatoes, and celebrate French Fries Day by eating yourself into a starch filled stupor!

mussels and fries[5]

Moules-frites—the Belgians discovered a perfect marriage. They steam their mussels in simple marinière style (flavored with a little chopped onion, celery, carrot, parsley, bay leaf, and thyme), and then serve heaping mounds of them.

Fitness Friday-The 5 Switches of Manliness: Physicality[6]

This post begins our series on the five switches of manliness. The five switches of manliness are the power switches that are connected to our primal man and deeply ingrained and embedded in the male psyche. When they’re turned off, we feel restless, angry, and apathetic. When they’re turned on, we feel alive, invigorated, motivated to be our best, and just plain manly. The two principles behind these posts that must be adopted in order for the recommendations to be successfully integrated are: 1) the switches are simply either on or off, and 2) turning them on requires only small and simple changes in behavior. The biggest obstacle to flipping the switches will be pride–the belief that firing up our masculinity requires arduous, mystical, and/or perfectly “authentic” tasks. Just because you cannot do everything does not mean you cannot do something. The maxim to adopt is this: “By small and simple means I will flip the switches of manliness.”

When seeking to activate the deeply encoded parts of primitive masculinity, there is no better place to start than physicality. Primitive man used his body all day every day: building, hunting, walking, dancing, fighting.

For modern man, these activities have been replaced with sitting. Many of us sit for twelve hours or more a day. Sit down for breakfast, sit in the car on the way to work, sit at your desk all day, sit in your car on the way home from work, sit in front of the tv at night…. Rinse and repeat.

Sitting represents the ultimate in passive living; it practically shuts your body down–your heart rate, calorie burn, insulin effectiveness, and levels of good cholesterol drop as your risk of obesity and diabetes goes up. Or, as Dr. James Levine, leader in the emerging field of “inactivity studies,” puts it: when you sit, “the muscles go as silent as those of a dead horse.”

“Excessive sitting,” Dr. Levine says, “is a lethal activity.” And he’s not kidding. A study found that men who sit for more than six hours of their leisure time each day had a 20% higher death rate than those who sat for three hours or less. The epidemiologist who conducted the study, Alpha Patel, concluded that excessive sitting literally shortens a person’s life by several years (not to mention the years that are simply wasted from sitting as opposed to doing anything). Another study showed that men who sat for 23 or more hours a week had a 64% greater chance of dying from heart disease than those who sat for 11 hours per week or less.

Not only is sitting around literally killing us, but it’s also throwing a wet rag on our manliness.

Let’s get Physical-Physical-St Joseph Workout

Daily Devotions

·         Unite in the work of the Porters of St. Joseph by joining them in fasting: Holy Priests, Consecrated, & Religious notice I haven’t found a link to someone living to emulate-any suggestions-please post.

·         Novena to Our Lady of Mount Carmel-Day 6

·         Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus

·         Offering to the sacred heart of Jesus

·         Drops of Christ’s Blood

·         Universal Man Plan

·         Operation Purity

·         Rosary



[2]https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/calendar/day.cfm?date=2018-07-12

[3]https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/simplicity-day/

[5] Schultz, Patricia. 1,000 Places to See Before You Die





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