Sunday, July 17, 2016

Acts, Chapter 19, verse 17
When this became known to all the Jews and Greeks who lived in Ephesus, fear fell upon them all, and the name of the Lord Jesus was held in great esteem.

In Paul’s time there were traveling Jewish’s exorcists that were not of the faith but attempted to remove demons in Jesus’ name and the demons said to the Jewish exorcist, “Jesus I recognize, Paul I know, but who are you?” and then attacked them.

Holy fear teaches us the necessity of being faithful to the end.

Three Signs of the end[1]

Of the time of tribulation­, the Catechism states, “Before Christ's second coming the Church must pass through a final trial that will shake the faith of many believers [Cf. Lk 21:12; Jn 15:19-20]” (par 675). This time of trial will be marked by religious deception, apostasy from the true Faith, and the rise of the antichrist. This time of trial at the end of history will reveal the fullness of antichrist, “a pseudo-messianism by which man glorifies himself in place of God and of his Messiah come in the flesh. . . .” (CCC, 675). History has witnessed much speculation about the antichrist, including writings by the Church Fathers about his background and methods of destruction. What is more clear is that when history draws to a close Satan and his followers—both demonic and human—will seek to destroy as many souls as possible, unleashing diabolic destruction and causing widespread apostasy. We also know the spirit of antichrist is already within the world, just as it has been for two thousand years: “Children, it is the last hour; and just as you heard that antichrist is coming, even now many antichrists have arisen; from this we know that it is the last hour” (1 Jn 2:18). There is deception and apostasy; there are many who mock Christ and even many self-described Christians who deny him (see 1 Jn 2:22; 4:3; 2 Jn 7). In the Olivet Discourse, also known as “the little apocalypse,” Jesus told the disciples: “And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in the whole world for a witness to all the nations, and then the end shall come” (Mt 24:14). Has this occurred? Arguments can be made either way. As Ralph Martin, author of Is Jesus Coming Soon? (Ignatius Press, 1997), has noted, “It is difficult to know whether this universal proclamation has taken place. Certain nations have had the gospel preached to them in the past but not in the present.” The one certainty is the Gospel must be preached to as many people as possible; evangelization and missions are never optional, but always imperative. Of the third event, the Church states Israel’s recognition of Jesus as the Messiah will take place prior to the parousia. This is based on Romans 9-11 and Paul’s teaching that “hardening has come upon Israel in part, until the full number of Gentiles comes in” (Rom 11:25). Yet is far from evident how this “full inclusion” of ethnic Israel into the Church will come about. It would seem it has not yet taken place; perhaps it has already begun in ways not fully understood or recognized. What is certain is that Catholics, while always respecting the free will of every man, have an obligation to be spiritually prepared, to evangelize, and to advance the Kingdom.“…and after this comes judgment” 

Before the end comes please enjoy some ice cream with your children or Grandchildren

National Ice Cream Day History[2]

National Ice Cream Day is dedicated to appreciating ice cream.  In 1984, Senator Walter Dee Huddleston of Kentucky initiated a joint resolution to declare July as the National Ice Cream Month and July 15 as National Ice Cream Day.  On July 9, 1984, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed July 1984 as the National Ice Cream Month and July 15, 1984 as the National Ice Cream Day. This holiday is now celebrated on the third Sunday of July.  

According to the International Dairy Foods Association, the origins of ice cream date back to the second century B.C., when several prominent historical figures such as Alexander the Great, King Soloman and Nero Claudius Caesar enjoyed consuming iced beverages and snow. As the centuries passed, the snow and ice was refined into cream ice and eventually, in 1777, ice cream was first advertised in New York. However, ice cream was a rare delicacy for the elite until 1800s when ice houses were built. Since then, it has become a staple dessert for the American people.

National Ice Cream Day Facts & Quotes
  • During the summer of 1790, President George Washington spent $200 on ice cream.  Meanwhile, according to Thomas Berry of Duke University, the price of 1 pound of coffee was $0.50 in 1788.
  • 10% of milk in the US goes towards making ice cream.
  • During World War II, ice cream was served to troops to boost morale while sanctions and rationing was in effect for the general public.  When the war ended, rationing of ice cream was lifted and Americans celebrated victory with a cold, creamy treat. In fact, each American consumed more than 20 quarts of ice cream in 1946.
  • In 2014, 872 million gallons of ice cream were produced in the United States.  The average American annually consumes 22 pounds of ice cream.
  • Ice cream is a nutritious and wholesome food, enjoyed by over ninety percent of the people in the United States. It enjoys a reputation as the perfect dessert and snack food. Over eight hundred and eighty-seven million gallons of ice cream were consumed in the United States in 1983. - President Ronald Reagan, Proclamation 5219 - National Ice Cream Month and National Ice Cream Day, 1984




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