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Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 Feast of the Conversion of Saint Paul, Apostle

Exodus, Chapter 1, Verse 17
The midwives, however, feared God; they did not do as the king of Egypt had ordered them, but let the boys live.

The book of Exodus retells the story of the leaving of the children of Abraham from the land of Egypt. God blessed Abraham’s descendants and they prospered and overpopulated the land. Egyptians then oppressed the Israelites and took action to control their population by commanding midwives to kill the male children born to the Israelite’s.

Nothing ever changes it seems the midwives, were the king of Egypt’s version of our Planned Parenthood. Yet, they the midwives feared God more than the King and spared life. I do not think anyone in the Planned Parenthood organization has any fear of God. The midwives of Egypt were ordered to kill only the male children of the Israelites. In our modern world I wonder who the equivalent of the King of Egypt is. I wonder who or what sex and races are the equivalents of the Israelite children?

Let us pray that those within the Planned Parenthood organization and those who support the existence of organizational weapons for the destruction of innocent unborn life may have an awakening to the voice of conscience and fear God: thus preserving life first, then liberty and then the pursuit of happiness. For is not life more, precious than liberty; and is not liberty more precious than the pursuit of wealth. It can be in no other order. As a people and as a nation we have dulled our consciences for too long; this is why the soul of this nation can find no peace. We like the midwives of ancient Egypt must fear God more than Pharaoh. Then and only then will our consciences as a people become unsullied and we will have the strength, courage and loyalty to follow what is right. 

Yes, if we as a people see Christ in the unborn as Paul seen Him at his conversion we shall again be a bless nation.

Feast of the conversion of St. Paul[1]

St. Paul was born at Tarsus, Cilicia, of Jewish parents who were descended from the tribe of Benjamin. He was a Roman citizen from birth. To complete his schooling, St. Paul was sent to Jerusalem, where he sat at the feet of the learned Gamaliel and was educated in the strict observance of the ancestral Law. As a convinced and zealous Pharisee, he returned to Tarsus before the public life of Christ in Palestine.

Sometime after the death of Our Lord, St. Paul returned to Palestine. His profound conviction made his zeal develop to a religious fanaticism against the infant Church. He took part in the stoning of the first martyr, St. Stephen, and in the fierce persecution of the Christians that followed. Entrusted with a formal mission from the high priest, he departed for Damascus to arrest the Christians there and bring them bound to Jerusalem. As he was nearing Damascus, about noon, a light from heaven suddenly blazed round him. Jesus with His glorified body appeared to him and addressed him, turning him away from his apparently successful career. An immediate transformation was wrought in the soul of St. Paul. He was suddenly converted to the Christian Faith. He was baptized, changed his name from Saul to Paul, and began travelling and preaching the Faith. He was martyred as an Apostle in Rome around 65 AD.

What do we learn from this history?[2] Not to despise any sinner, nor to despair of his salvation: for, like Paul on the road to Damascus, the greatest sinner may, by the grace of God, be suddenly converted, and become a saint. At the command of God he accepted Ananias as his leader in the way of salvation, and became as zealous for the honor of Christ as he had previously been intent on persecuting Him. In like manner, a convert must shut his eyes to all by which he has heretofore been led astray, and must give heed to that only which God commands.


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