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Ember Saturday AUTUMNAL EQUINOX 1 Corinthians, Chapter 14, Verse 32-33 32 Indeed, the spirits of prophets are under the prop...

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Sunday, July 16, 2017

SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST-FEAST OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL (15th S. Ord. Time)

This Sunday focuses on the need for constant repentance and fidelity to our baptismal vows

1 Maccabees, Chapter 12, Verse 28
When the enemy heard that Jonathan and his men were ready for battle, their hearts sank with fear and dread. They lighted fires in their camp and then withdrew.

As this little soap opera continues we last see that Jonathan took care of the Greek Apollonius. In many ways this little ditty is like the gang warfare in Chicago or LA. Amazingly the area is about the same size. As the story continues we see more betrayal. Demetrius forms an alliance with Ptolemy to take Alexander’s turf and add it to Egypt’s. Then, begins the all-out turf war, cross and double cross with no real winners; Jonathan then saw that the time was right, he chose men and sent them to Rome to confirm and renew the friendship with the Romans. He also sent letters to the Spartans and other places to the same effect. He is hedging his bet. Now we come to this verse where Demetrius sends a large army to attack Jonathan. Jonathan is prepared for this and when Demetrius’ army discovers how prepared they are they flee by a rouse. Clever little cowards; like all bullies when confronted they exit stage left. It seems that men haven’t really changed much since the days of Jonathan Maccabee. Perhaps this is why it is not included in the protestant bible who wants to see we are in need of God’s help. We must admit our failures; repent and strive to live our baptismal vows.

Renewal of Baptismal Promises[1]

V. Do you reject Satan?
R. I do.
V. And all his works?
R. I do.
V. And all his empty promises?
R. I do.
V. Do you believe in God, the Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth?
R. I do.
V. Do you believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was born of the Virgin Mary was crucified, died, and was buried, rose from the dead, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father?
R. I do.
V. Do you believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting?
R. I do.
V. God, the all-powerful Father of our Lord Jesus Christ has given us a new birth by water and the Holy Spirit, and forgiven all our sins. May he also keep us faithful to our Lord Jesus Christ for ever and ever.
R. Amen.

(This is a family service that is directed by one of the parents. The family members renew their baptismal vows and sprinkle themselves with the Easter water,)

Let us remember that will our ladies help we can live up to these promises.

Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel[2]

THE Church celebrates on this day the feast of the Scapular of Mount Carmel. The scapular, which derives its name from the Latin word scapulas, meaning shoulders, is a dress which covers the shoulders. It is mentioned in the rule of St. Benedict as worn by monks over their other dress when they were at work, and it now forms a regular part of the religious dress in the old Orders. But it is best known among Catholics as the name of two little pieces of cloth worn out of devotion to the Blessed Virgin over the shoulders, under the ordinary garb, and connected by strings. The devotion of the scapular, now almost universal in the Catholic Church, began with the Carmelites. The history of its origin is as follows: During the thirteenth century the Carmelite Order suffered great persecution, and on July 16, 1251, while St. Simon Stock, then general of the Order, was at prayer, the Blessed Virgin appeared to him, holding in her hand a scapular. Giving it to the saint, she said, ”Receive, my dear son, this scapular of thy Order, as the distinctive sign of my confraternity, and the mark of the privilege which I have obtained for thee and the children of Carmel. It is a sign of salvation, a safeguard in danger, and a special pledge of peace and protection till the end of time.” “Whosoever dies wearing this shall be preserved from eternal flames.” It is much to be wished that people should everywhere join this confraternity, for the honor of Mary and for the salvation of souls, by a life fitted to that end. In order to have a share in the merits of the sodality every member must: 1. Shun sin, and, according to his state of life, live chastely. 2. Say every day, if possible, seven times, Our Father, Hail Mary, and Glory Be to the Father. 3. Strive to serve God by venerating Mary, and imitating her virtues. These rules, it is true, are not binding under penalty of sin, but the breach of them deprives us of all merit; and is not this something to be taken into account? “He who soweth sparingly shall also reap sparingly.”(n. Cor. ix. 6).

Things to Do[3]

·         If you have not already done so, have a priest enroll you in the Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, or popularly known as the "Brown Scapular" and begin wearing it as a sign of your love for Our Lady.
·         Wearing the Brown Scapular is not an automatic guarantee of salvation. It is not a magical charm, nor is it an excuse to live in a way contrary to the teachings of the Church. (see Catechism, no. 1670.)
·         See the Directory on Popular Piety the Brown Scapular is included in the document as a wonderful pious practice. The history of Marian piety also includes "devotion" to various scapulars, the most common of which is devotion to the Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Its use is truly universal and, undoubtedly, it is one of those pious practices which the Council described as "recommended by the Magisterium throughout the centuries."
·         Pope John Paul II has worn the scapular for a long time. See the Holy Father's talk on the Scapular of Carmel, A Treasure for the Church.
·         For the definitive treatment on the brown scapular, read The Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel: Catechesis and Ritual.
·         The Blessed Virgin's scapular should remind us that Christians have an apostolate against current extremes and extravagances in modes of dress. Clothes are a symbol of the person. Like the Christian heart, dress must be chaste and simple, for one judges the interior from the exterior. It should not be necessary to add that special attention be given this matter when preparing for church attendance. Examine yourself on how well you reflect Christian modesty in your dress and if you are a parent, how well you ensure that your children are modestly dressed.
·         In New York City in East Harlem is one of the oldest festivals in America for Our Lady of Mount Carmel. See Our Lady of Mount Carmel Shrine of East Harlem – since 1881. Also Williamsburg in Brooklyn, NY annually holds the Festival of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel and St. Paulinus of Nola (Festa Del Giglio). It is unique to see a scene that one would expect in Europe unfolding on the street of a major East coast city. You can view a You Tube clip right here. Also look around your area for Italian parishes, maybe one named after Our Lady of Mount Carmel? Many times the parish will host wonderful festivals in her honor.
·         Watch this You Tube video to learn more about devotion to Our Lady of Mt. Carmel.
·         From the Catholic Culture library, the Scapular Devotion, a description of Different Kinds of Scapulars, The Brown Scapular and information on the Scapular Medal.
·         Learn more about St. Simon Stock and the Brown Scapular.

National Ice Cream Day History[4]

National Ice Cream Day is dedicated to appreciating ice cream.  In 1984, Senator Walter Dee Huddleston of Kentucky initiated a joint resolution to declare July as the National Ice Cream Month and July 15 as National Ice Cream Day.  On July 9, 1984, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed July 1984 as the National Ice Cream Month and July 15, 1984 as the National Ice Cream Day. This holiday is now celebrated on the third Sunday of July.  

According to the International Dairy Foods Association, the origins of ice cream date back to the second century B.C., when several prominent historical figures such as Alexander the Great, King Soloman and Nero Claudius Caesar enjoyed consuming iced beverages and snow. As the centuries passed, the snow and ice was refined into cream ice and eventually, in 1777, ice cream was first advertised in New York. However, ice cream was a rare delicacy for the elite until 1800s when ice houses were built. Since then, it has become a staple dessert for the American people.

National Ice Cream Day Facts & Quotes

·         During the summer of 1790, President George Washington spent $200 on ice cream.  Meanwhile, according to Thomas Berry of Duke University, the price of 1 pound of coffee was $0.50 in 1788.
·         10% of milk in the US goes towards making ice cream.
·         During World War II, ice cream was served to troops to boost morale while sanctions and rationing was in effect for the general public.  When the war ended, rationing of ice cream was lifted and Americans celebrated victory with a cold, creamy treat. In fact, each American consumed more than 20 quarts of ice cream in 1946.
·         In 2014, 872 million gallons of ice cream were produced in the United States.  The average American annually consumes 22 pounds of ice cream.
·         Ice cream is a nutritious and wholesome food, enjoyed by over ninety percent of the people in the United States. It enjoys a reputation as the perfect dessert and snack food. Over eight hundred and eighty-seven million gallons of ice cream were consumed in the United States in 1983. - President Ronald Reagan, Proclamation 5219 - National Ice Cream Month and National Ice Cream Day, 1984


Daily Devotions/Prayers
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood



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