Wednesday, October 18, 2017

FEAST OF ST. LUKE



Psalm 145, Verse 19
He fulfills the desire of those who fear him; he hears their cry and saves them.

In this psalm the singer invites all to praise God. The “works of God” make God present and invite human praise; they climax in a confession. God’s mighty acts show forth divine kingship, a major theme in the literature of early Judaism and in Christianity.[1]

I would like to focus on the word desire from verse 19 above. I like to hike and pray. One day I was hiking in the Fay Canyon area of Sedona, Arizona and I was reflecting on the seven deadly sins and the opposing virtues of our Lord sermon on the mount. As I was hiking and musing over the words that are associated with the deadly sin of lust: such words as long for, hanker for, hunger for, yearn, crave, and desire.  In my mind I repeated desire, desire, desire and I asked our Lord what do you want me to desire? As I asked that question I looked up at the canyon and spied a rock formation in the shape of a chalice.  Yes Lord, I exclaimed. I shall desire to receive you in the Holy Mass. Today would be a good day to rest in the Lord and go to Confession and Mass-receiving true health; His body and blood. As we receive realize that He has heard our cry’s and has saved us. Such is the love of our God!

1465 When he celebrates the sacrament of Penance, the priest is fulfilling the ministry of the Good Shepherd who seeks the lost sheep, of the Good Samaritan who binds up wounds, of the Father who awaits the prodigal son and welcomes him on his return, and of the just and impartial judge whose judgment is both just and merciful. The priest is the sign and the instrument of God's merciful love for the sinner.

Feast of Saint Luke[2]

Into whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace to this household.'

This day celebrates the life of St. Luke, one of Jesus' 12 disciples.  Luke was thought to be an educated Gentile, or non-Jew, and may have even been a physician.  Some biblical historians believe he may have even been a slave. Luke wrote two books in the New Testament -- the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles. The Gospel of Luke focuses on converting non-Jews to Christianity.

St Luke Facts

·         Luke worked with the apostle Paul, and traveled with him throughout Asia Minor, proclaiming the Good News of Jesus Christ.
·         The Gospel of Luke describes a popular passage referred to as the 'The Parable of the Good Samaritan'.   In it a traveling man is attacked by robbers who strip and beat him.  A priest and a Levite pass by without helping him.  A Samaritan stops and cares for him, taking him to an inn where the Samaritan pays for his care. (Luke 10:25-37)
·         What became of Luke is unclear.  Some accounts say he was martyred, while others say that he lived to an old age and died in Greece.
·         The feast Day for St. Luke is held on October 18 in the Roman Catholic, Orthodox Church and some Protestant churches.  The Orthodox Church refers to this day as the Feast of the Holy Apostle and Evangelist Luke.


St Luke Top Events and Things to Do

·         Read the second chapter of the Gospel of Luke.  This is the story that is most often read at Christmas time about the birth of Jesus Christ.
·         Read the popular 'Parable of the Good Samaritan'.  Use this to inspire you to go out of your comfort zone to help someone in need.
·         Some traditions believe that St. Luke, in addition to being a writer and physician, was a painter.  Do a little artwork today to honor the saint.
·         Go get a check up.  Luke was a physician.  Take care of your body in honor of St. Luke.
·         Pray for doctors and those who care for the sick through the intercession of St. Luke, patron of physicians.
·         Foods this day to honor St. Luke would include some beef dish, as he is known as the "ox" and is the patron of butchers. For dessert, bake some raisin Banbury Tarts to evoke the festivals of England on this day, or a cake in the shape of a book with decorations of a calf or ox for this evangelist.
·         Today is also known as "Sour Cakes Day" in Scotland, because baked cakes were eaten with sour cream in Rutherglen.
·         Around this feast is known as "St. Luke's Little Summer," a period of summer-like days that occur around October 18 named to honor the saint's feast day. It's similar to the the term "Indian Summer," which officially occurs between November 11-20). St. Luke gives us some golden days before the cold of winter.
·         St. Luke is also called the evangelist which we are to emulate. Next week; we will celebrate World Mission Sunday. Each year, the entire Church is invited to support the young mission dioceses in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Islands, and parts of Latin America and Europe, where priests, religious and lay leaders serve the poorest of the poor. This year, we are invited to “Chat With The Pope” to learn more about his missions. Scan this year’s World Mission Sunday poster using Facebook Messenger for your mobile device, or learn more at ChatWithThePope.org.

Cyprus’s Painted Churches[3]

Above seaside Lemosos and on the eastern flank of 6,500-foot Mt. Olympus, you’ll also find ten magnificent medieval churches and monasteries, whose modest exteriors stand in contrast to their rich interiors, embellished with some of the finest Byzantine frescoes and icons in the Mediterranean. At the ornate 11th-century Kykkos Monastery, even the cloisters are richly frescoed and a golden icon of the Virgin ascribed to St. Luke is said to work miracles. Agios Nikolaos tis Stegis (St. Nicholas of the Roof) is covered entirely in wall paintings. The monks who lived here were not only gifted artists but also master vintners, following a 5,500-year-old wine-making tradition in Cyprus. Stop at Chrysorrogiatissa Monastery for a visit to the region’s oldest wine-making site. The dark amber– colored Commandaria, a sweet wine that was a favorite elixir of medieval crusaders, is thought to be the world’s oldest appellation and is made from centuries-old vines in the Troodos foothills. For something with a little more kick, stop in any village bar for a glass of zivania, a centuries-old Cypriot beverage produced from the residue of grapes. With a 45 percent (and up) alcohol content, it is also used to treat wounds and sore throats.



Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood


[3]Schultz, Patricia. 1,000 Places to See Before You Die

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