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Tuesday, May 28, 2019


Rogation Tuesday
SAINT BERNARD

Acts, Chapter 16, verse 27-30
27 When the jailer woke up and saw the prison doors wide open, he drew [his] sword and was about to kill himself, thinking that the prisoners had escaped. 28 But Paul shouted out in a loud voice, “Do no harm to yourself; we are all here.” 29 He asked for a light and rushed in and, trembling with fear, he fell down before Paul and Silas. 30 Then he brought them out and said, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?”

In this work of God’s Mercy, Christ frees the jailer from the jail of fear and sin.

Freeing of the Jailer of his jail[1]

Paul was not overwhelmed by circumstances. The earthquake had not numbed him with fear. He had no abject terror of death. Paul had his wits about him. He heard the jailer's cry, heard the sword being drawn - perhaps, he saw the shadow of it cast by the dim lamplight upon the prison wall and spoke out in mercy to save the man's life from the consequences of sin.

The penal consequence of sin is death. There are three kinds of death that result from sin. Sinners are dead to God. There is no real communion between God and us. He has withdrawn and no longer walks with us in the cool of the day. All men physically die. Our old bodies will not last forever. Finally, for those who remain God's enemies at heart there is ultimately the destruction of both body and soul.

Our fallen natures continually drag us down. We have little power to withstand the inclination to sin when it is strong upon us. We scarcely live a day of our lives without falling short of the standards we set ourselves let along the standards that God sets. It is very doubtful that the Philippian jailer thought along these lines exactly - nor do most people who are converted! The jailer just knew that he needed saving from the way he was. He compared himself with Paul and Silas and he was disgusted with the life he led. He hadn't the fortitude, inner joy, peace or consideration for others that Paul exhibited. The jailer feared death. He had no sort of relationship with God. He had no hope of life beyond the grave because he had no assurance that God was interested him let alone loved him. The jailer was lost, and he knew it.


Paul and Silas replied to the jailer's question as one: "Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved - you and your household." Paul did not point the jailer to Jesus' saving work but to Jesus himself. This is because in the first instance the human heart must submit to Jesus. A sinner has to answer, "I will," to that command of Paul and Silas. Saving faith involves submitting, surrendering and yielding to Jesus. The rebel has to shoulder arms and say to the Savior, "I give in. Please rescue me."

Rogationtide Tuesday[2]

The Lesser Rogation Days prior to the Ascension were especially important in rural communities dependent on agricultural bounty. They were also the inspiration for a number of semi-liturgical imitations, where farmers would take holy water and douse their fields for protection and blessing. Perhaps this would be a good time to have one's garden blessed. Another interesting feature of Rogationtide is the tradition of having parishioners end resentments or conflicts that had been festering between them. Eoman Duffy's The Stripping of the Altars includes vivid accounts from pre-Reformation England of some of these reconciliations.[3]


Today would be a good day to reflect on what we want to harvest this fall; so like farmers we must till the soil of our soul reflecting this day on our use of our TALENTS and look at in what ways we may offer our abilities to Christ to help build a harvest for His Kingdom.

Human Work[4]

Saint John Paul II wrote the Encyclical "Laborem Exercens" in 1981, on the occasion of the 90th anniversary of Leo XIII's Encyclical "Rerum Novarum" on the question of labor. In it he develops the concept of man's dignity in work, structuring it in four points: the subordination of work to man; the primacy of the worker over the whole of instruments and conditioning that historically constitute the world of labor; the rights of the human person as the determining factor of all socio-economic, technological and productive processes, that must be recognized; and some elements that can help all men identify with Christ through their own work.
Work is one of these aspects, a perennial and fundamental one, one that is always relevant and constantly demands renewed attention and decisive witness."
The Church considers it her task always to call attention to the dignity and rights of those who work, to condemn situations in which that dignity and those rights are violated, and to ensure authentic progress by man and society." "Human work is a key, probably the essential key, to the whole social question, if we try to see that question really from the point of view of man's good. And if the solution - or rather the gradual solution - of the social question, which keeps coming up and becomes ever more complex, must be sought in the direction of 'making life more human', then the key, namely human work, acquires fundamental and decisive importance."


Work and Man

John Paul, "work is a fundamental dimension of man's existence on earth." This conviction is found in the first pages of Genesis: "Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it." "Man's dominion over the earth is achieved in and by means of work. ... The proper subject of work continues to be man," and the finality of work "is always man himself." It is a question of the objective and subjective meaning of work: although both are important, the second takes precedence; "there is no doubt that human work has an ethical value of its own, which clearly and directly remains linked to the fact that the one who carries it out is a person, a conscious and free subject, that is to say a subject that decides about himself." Although technology fosters an increase in the things produced by work, sometimes it "can cease to be man's ally and become almost his enemy, as when the mechanization of work 'supplants' him, taking away all personal satisfaction and the incentive to creativity and responsibility, when it deprives many workers of their previous employment, or when, through exalting the machine, it reduces man to the status of its slave." "in order to achieve social justice in the various parts of the world, in the various countries, and in the relationships between them, there is a need for ever new movements of solidarity of the workers and with the workers."
"Work is a good thing for man - a good thing for his humanity - because through work man not only transforms nature, adapting it to his own needs, but he also achieves fulfillment as a human being and indeed, in a sense, becomes 'more a human being'."


Conflict: Labor and Capital in the Present Phase of History

The Pope observes that during the period which has passed since the publication of "Rerum Novarum" (1891), "which is by no means yet over, the issue of work has of course been posed on the basis of the great conflict that in the age of, and together with, industrial development emerged between 'capital' and 'labor'." This antagonism "found expression in the ideological conflict between liberalism, understood as the ideology of capitalism, and Marxism, understood as the ideology of scientific socialism and communism, which professes to act as the spokesman for the working class and the world-wide proletariat." Later, he recalls the principle of "the priority of labor over capital." The first "is always a primary efficient cause, while capital, the whole collection of means of production, remains a mere instrument or instrumental cause." Thus appears the error of economism, "that of considering human labor solely according to its economic purpose." John Paul II then refers to the right to private property, emphasizing that the Church's teaching regarding this principle "diverges radically from the program of collectivism as proclaimed by Marxism," and "the program of capitalism practiced by liberalism and by the political systems inspired by it." "The position of 'rigid' capitalism continues to remain unacceptable, namely the position that defends the exclusive right to private ownership of the means of production as an untouchable 'dogma' of economic life. The principle of respect for work demands that this right should undergo a constructive revision, both in theory and in practice." For this reason, regardless of the type of system of production, it is necessary for each worker to be aware that "he is working 'for himself'."


Rights of Workers

The Holy Father highlights that the human rights that are derived from work are a part of the fundamental rights of the person.
·         He discusses the need to take action against unemployment, which is a true social calamity and a problem of a moral as well as an economic nature. Starting with the concept of the "indirect employer," in other words, "all the agents at the national and international level that are responsible for the whole orientation of labor policy," he notes that in order to solve the problem of unemployment, these agents "must make provision for overall planning." This "cannot mean one-sided centralization by the public authorities. Instead, what is in question is a just and rational coordination, within the framework of which the initiative of individuals ... must be safeguarded."
·         Speaking of the rights of workers, he recalls the dignity of agricultural work and the need to offer jobs to disabled people. As for the matter of salaries, he writes that "the key problem of social ethics in this case is that of just remuneration for work done."
·         In addition, "there must be a social re-evaluation of the mother's role." Specifically, "the whole labor process must be organized and adapted in such a way as to respect the requirements of the person and his or her forms of life, above all life in the home, taking into account the individual's age and sex."
·         It is fitting that women "should be able to fulfill their tasks in accordance with their own nature, without being discriminated against and without being excluded from jobs for which they are capable, but also without lack of respect for their family aspirations and for their specific role in contributing, together with men, to the good of society."
·          Besides wages, there are other social benefits whose objective is "to ensure the life and health of workers and their families." In this regard, he notes the right to leisure time, which should include weekly rest and yearly vacations.
·         The Pope then considers the importance of unions, which he calls "an indispensable element of social life." "One method used by unions in pursuing the just rights of their members is the strike or work stoppage. This method is recognized by Catholic social teaching as legitimate in the proper conditions and within just limits," but must not be abused.
·         As for the question of emigration for work reasons, he affirms that man has the right to leave his country to seek better living conditions in another. "The most important thing is that the person working away from his native land, whether as a permanent emigrant or as a seasonal worker, should not be placed at a disadvantage in comparison with the other workers in that society in the matter of working rights."
Elements for a Spirituality of Work

·         Labor has meaning in God's eyes. Thus, "the knowledge that by means of work man shares in the work of creation constitutes the most profound motive for undertaking it in various sectors."
·         Labor is participation in the work of the Creator and the Redeemer. Jesus Christ looks upon work with love because he himself was a laborer.
·         This is a doctrine, and at the same time a program, that is rooted in the "Gospel of work" proclaimed by Jesus of Nazareth. "By enduring the toil of work in union with Christ crucified for us, man in a way collaborates with the Son of God for the redemption of humanity. He shows himself a true disciple of Christ by carrying the cross in his turn every day in the activity that he is called upon to perform."

10 things happy professionals do before 10 a.m.[5]

Success often seems like a visionary goal — a feat in life that’s attempted only after many strides, plenty of pitfalls and a healthy serving of endurance. However, for those who consider themselves fulfilled by their career, it’s not only a sense of accomplishment and an impressive LinkedIn profile that defines their satisfaction with their work. In fact, their overall desire to work harder and effectively doesn’t just stem from extra zeros on their paycheck, but rather, it derives from a place of happiness. As the old rhyme reminds, contentment isn’t a destination, but a process — and if you’re smart, a priority for both your professional and personal life. How do you carve in time to, well, improve your overall mood and outlook?

Here, life coaches and psychologists explain the joint secrets happy professionals share:


1. They get enough sleep
Even if college was many moons ago, you’ve likely pulled an all-nighter in the past year. Or, you’ve been so overworked and double-booked that you spent more time tossing and turning than resting. For those people who wake up ready – and elated – to tackle the day ahead, the eight hours that come before the alarm clock dings are just as important as the minutes that follow it. As licensed therapist Melody Li explains, many workers overlook the power of a good night’s sleep in an effort to push their minds and bodies to the limit. As studies indicate and Li reminds, not reaping the rewards of shuteye usually results in poor memory, difficulty problem-solving and unexplained ups and downs. Professionals who tuck themselves into bed instead of watching Netflix (or their favorite YouTube videos on repeat)? They wake up in better spirits.

2. They take their time
Sure, there are some mornings that warrant that tempting snooze button, but to rise on the right side of the bed, yoga therapist and natural health expert Dr. Lynn Anderson Ph.D., giving yourself time to linger is key. When you feel frazzled or pressed for time, you’ll not only make more mistakes which can bum-out your confidence levels, but you don’t allow yourself to ease into the day’s tasks in an enjoyable manner. “Get up early enough to relax, enjoy a cup of tea or coffee and organize the day. Rushing and running late leads to stress and stress is like a fire extinguisher for happiness. It’s a poisonous gas that makes a mess. Being organized and relaxed creates happiness,” she shares.

3. They make their bed
Seems simple enough, but how often do you leave your apartment or home in shambles? It’s easy to forget in the hustle of the morning, but motivational speaker and workplace expert Amy Cooper Hakim, Ph.D. says there’s a sense of glee found when your living area is prime. “A happy professional builds confidence and self-efficacy by completing a simple chore like making her bed before heading to the office. This act sets a ‘can do’ mindset into motion for the day. It’s an easy task to check off the to-do list,” she shares. “When we accomplish one item on our agenda, we are more driven to accomplish others. Also, as a double bonus, many find it especially comforting and gratifying to climb into a made bed at the end of a long day!”

4. They are able to see gratitude and practice humility
We all have that Wonder Woman (or man) in our life that seemingly glides through life, experiencing it all with ease. They’re top of their game at work, thoughtful and kind to others, brave to their core, and overall, rather funny. If you dig a little deeper, you’ll notice a common thread of humility in these happy-go-lucky, positive-thinking individuals. Career coach and shamanic practitioner John Moore explains that those who exercise gratitude as part of their daily routine tend to be more joyful, in life and in work. He adds that research even indicates thankful people have better relationships and more enduring psychological health.

5. They set daily goals
Yep, you read that correctly: Happy professionals are masters of setting micro, 24/7 goals that keep them on the right track. As career and branding expert Wendi Weiner explains, those who are able to turnaround the best work with the best attitude take the time to plan ahead, so they aren’t caught in a bind or a last-minute deadline that slipped off their radar. “These are non-negotiable tasks that must be completed for that day. The reason for this is that when you actually achieve what you set out to achieve, that will raise the level of happiness and personal satisfaction,” she says.

6. They communicate with others
Those people who are nearly always smiling — and not faking it, but really grinning their heart out — usually want to spend time with one another. Moore explains that the pull comes from a part in our brains called the ‘anterior cingulate cortex’ which measures social status, as well as pain and a high number of opiate receptors. “Social exclusion registers in the brain much like physical pain. In studies, one of the greatest predictors of happiness is the breadth of social networks,” he says.
Even if you don’t start chatting up a storm with your partner or your morning-hating roommate, Moore says you’ll start the day off brighter if you, at the very least, communicate in some way. “Happy professionals focus some of their morning time growing and nurturing social connections. Check in with friends, meet someone for coffee, chat up the cute barista — just start talking!” he says.

7. They keep their calendars open
It might be difficult to tango around time zones if you have international clients, but if you can help it, health coach Kenneth Rippetoe recommends keeping your calendar completely free until after 10 a.m. This gives you time to prepare for your day and be mindful of the moments you’re giving your energy to others, instead of always being readily available. “Practice being intentional with your time and resources. When you are intentional, you make the choices that do align with your value system and goals for your personal and professional life,” he explains.

8. They focus on the present and future, not the past
Ask anyone who has been able to send away the skeletons in their closet and they’ll agree that releasing the mistakes of yesteryear was the first step. If you find yourself dreading each day or feeling anxious about how your career will exceed, Weiner suggests taking a page from the notebook of joy-focused professionals who make a habit of living in the moment and preparing for the future with a solid outlook. “Happy professionals will concentrate their focus on the present things they are doing and the present goals they want to achieve as well as the future things they plan to do and/or achieve,” she explains. “Their energy will concentrate less on regrets, and more on taking chances and risks to maximize their happiness.”

9. They complete a task that makes them feel powerful
Perhaps it was after you ran your very first 5K. Or landed a client that took months to romance. Or when you finally took the plunge and checked ‘bungee jumping’ off your bucket list. While you can’t perform one-of-a-kind feats every single day (sadly), Li stresses the importance of completing something in the A.M. that set you up to feel powerful throughout the day. Though every person will sing a different tune, it’s most important that you strategize your day to make time for this task. “For many, it’s some type of physical activity like running, swimming, or lifting. For others, it might be solving a tricky puzzle or crossword. It could be meditating, dancing to energetic music, or even stretching,” she explains. “Whatever that looks like to you, spend at least 15 minutes doing something that reinforces the strength that you hold within and carry this sense of power with you into your day.”

10. They visualize their success
Much like amping up for the future — whether it’s a month, a year or a decade away — psychologist and relationship expert Anotina Hall says happy careers are much like flourishing love affairs. To truly find the grace and vulnerability in the positions you’re in, you have to be courageous enough to imagine your future. As Hall explains, “Studies have shown that by spending even a few minutes each morning to visualize your goals coming to fruition with ease increases the likelihood of successfully accomplishing those goals.
“See your upcoming meeting in vivid detail, visualizing the desired outcome will help make it go well and build your confidence!”


St. Bernard of Montjoux-Patron of Mountaineers[6]

Historically today is the feast of St. Bernard of Montjoux, an Italian churchman, founder of the Alpine hospices of Saint Bernard. He is most famous for the hospices he built on the summits of passes over the Alps. Many pilgrims from France and Germany would travel over the Alps on their way to Rome, but it was always a possibility that one would die from freezing along the way. In the 9th century a system of hospices had been attempted but had lapsed long before Bernard's time. Bernard's hospices in the 11th century was placed under the care of clerics and laymen and were well equipped for the reception of all travelers. A now-famous breed of dogs, known for its endurance in high altitude and cold, was named in honor of this saint. Bernard's life has been the focus of many romantic plays and stories. Many of us may remember childhood stories of St. Bernard dogs coming to the rescue of stranded or injured victims on Alpine slopes. The dogs almost always seem to have a cask of Brandy attached to their collars and when the victims were revived by a good drink the dogs would lead them to safety.

Things to Do

·         Read History of the Grand St Bernard pass for background.
·         If you like dogs you might find this history of the Saint Bernard Dog interesting.


National Burger Day

National Burger Day is a day of appreciation for hamburgers.  The term hamburger is derived from the city of Hamburg, Germany, where beef from Hamburg cows was minced and formed into patties to make Hamburg steaks. The origin of the hamburger in the United States remains debated, although most claim that the hamburger originated between 1880 and 1900.  Since then, this beef patty in a bun has become a global staple of the fast-food diet and the backyard cookout.  In recent years, these traditional beef patties have been transformed to include other meat and vegetarian options such as, bison, ostrich, deer, chicken, turkey, veggies, tofu and bean patties. National Hamburger Day is celebrated annually on May 28th.

National Burger Day Facts & Quotes

·         Louis Lassen is believed to have invented the hamburger, according to New York Magazine.
·         The average American man consumes 6.9 oz. of meat per day, while women consume 4.4 oz.  Of this, 55% is red meat including beef, followed by poultry and fish.
·         In 2013, American meat companies produced 25.8 billion pounds of beef.  In 2014, the U.S. exported 1.7 billion pounds of beef.
·         The world's biggest burger weighed 2,014 pounds and required a crane to flip.  The Guinness World record holding burger was cooked at the Black Bear Casino Resort in Carlton, Minn.  The bacon cheeseburger had 16.5 pounds of bacon, 50 pounds of lettuce, 60 pounds of onions and 40 pounds of cheese.
·         One of the most expensive burgers in the world is The Biggest Damn Burger in the World, made by Juicy Foods in Corvallis, Oregon.  With a price tag of $5,000, the burger includes 777 pounds of meat and toppings.
·         In the States, you can buy Chinese food. In Beijing you can buy hamburger. It's very close. Now I feel the world become a big family, like a really big family. You have many neighbors. Not like before, two countries are far away. - Jet Li, Actor, Martial Artist.

National Burger Day Top Events and Things to Do

·         Host a backyard burger barbecue to celebrate the National Burger Day.
·         Attend a burger festival.  Here are some festivals to consider:
1) National Hamburger Festival, Akron, Ohio
2) Burger Fest, Hamburg, New York
3) Denver Burger Battle, Denver, Colorado
4) Taste of Hamburger Festival, Hamburg, PA
5) Sacramento Burger Battle, Sacramento, California
·         Try making burgers with alternative toppings.  Some of our favorites are:
1) Mac & Cheese
2) Avocado
3) Peanut Butter
4) Sunny Side-Up Egg
5) French Fries
·         For a healthier and nutritious take on the traditional burger, try a veggie burger.  Here are some suggestions for a veggie burger patty:
1) Middle Eastern Falafel burger patty made from fava beans and chickpeas.  Spices such as garlic, scallions, cumin and coriander can also be added.
2) Lentil and mushroom burger patty made from a combination of lentils, mushrooms, carrots, breadcrumbs and spices.
3) Black bean burger patty made from black beans and spices such as oregano, chili powder and lime juice.
4) Lentil and barley patty made from lentils, barley, breadcrumbs and spices including cumin, oregano, chili powder, black pepper and dry garlic powder.
·         Take up the challenge to create a healthy burger meal.  Some options include to replace burger toppings with broccoli and cheese, and replacing potato fries with baked sweet potatoes or replacing the bun with lettuce.

About the Beef[7]

Cheesy 'Juicy Lucy' Burger

Cheesy Juicy Lucy Burger is a cheeseburger with the cheese inside instead of on top. Surprise your guests at your next cookout with this incredibly cheesy, juicy burger.

Ingredients:

·         1 1/2 pounds Certified Angus Beef ®ground beef (80/20 blend ideal)
·         6 slices American cheese
·         3 cloves fresh garlic, finely chopped (or substitute 1 teaspoon garlic powder)
·         1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
·         1/2 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
·         1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
·         Canola cooking spray
·         4 buns
·         Grill pan or cast-iron pan (optional)

Instructions:

1.      Cut each cheese slice evenly into 4 squares; arrange in 4 stacks with 6 slices each.
2.      In a large mixing bowl combine ground beef, garlic, Worcestershire, salt and pepper; mix by hand.
3.      Form beef mixture into 8 thin patties on a large sheet pan. With your thumb, press an indented well in the center of 4 patties and put the portioned cheese in the wells. Encase the cheese with the remaining 4 patties, hand forming your burger to a uniform shape with sealed edges. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes before grilling.
4.      Spray burgers with a light coat of cooking spray. Grill or pan sear over high heat 3 minutes per side. Transfer to cool side of grill or 375°F oven to finish cooking to an internal doneness of 160°F (5 to 8 minutes). Remove from grill and rest at least 3 minutes for cheese to set.


Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         Manhood of Christ Day 5, Twelfth Week.
·         90 Days for our Nation, 54-day rosary-Day 16
·         I will have no sweets or junk food (Exception Sundays, Holidays and Feast Days that you fast the day before).
·         Do the Angelic liturgy of the hours for those who have fallen in the service of our nation.
·         Pray for the Pope, Bishops, Priest’s and Religious.

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To practice righteousness in the areas of moral concern we must strive for humility and its source in knowing that all goodness comes from the Spirit. 
Areas of Moral uprightness[1]avoid these like the plague
1.Falsehood and deceit 2.Exploitation of the land. 3.Lust and Adultery. 4.Rights of servants (We are all made in the image of God) 5.Hardness toward the poor and needy. 6.Idolatry. Social injustice is the reverse side of idolatry. 7.Hatred of enemies. Don’t curse. Repay evil with good. 8.Hospitality. In ancient society without …

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

ST JOHN PAUL II

Job, Chapter 21, Verse 9 Their homes are safe, without fear, and the rod of God is not upon them.
With the current political climate of today-The Dark State, Turkey, Sanctuary Cities, Gangs etc.; we may not be feeling safe in our homes. We may feel God’s rod is upon us. Yet, we learn that God does not wish to destroy us but bring about the best in us. The wages of sin are usually destruction, but God is mercy. As in the parable of the wheat and tares God allows the weeds to grow with the wheat. We often ask with Job, “Why do the wicked keep on living, grow old, become mighty in power? Mercy! Zophar & His Asps[1]
·Zophar decides to beat a dead horse. ·Not literally. ·He tells Job that the wicked get what they deserve from God.  ·For good measure, he adds that the venom of asps will poison people's stomachs and kill the sinners. Well that's graphic.
Job Refutes Zophar
·Job sticks to his guns. ·The wicked, he says, go unpunished all the time. Not that he's cool with …

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

SAINT JOSAPHAT-FULL BEAVER MOON
Psalm 40, verse 2-4 2 Surely, I wait for the LORD; who bends down to me and hears my cry, 3 Draws me up from the pit of destruction, out of the muddy clay, Sets my feet upon rock, steadies my steps, 4 And puts a new song in my mouth, a hymn to our God. Many shall look on in fear and they shall trust in the LORD.
So many in this nation have given in to modernism and we have descended into the pit of destruction. We see the leaders of this Nation clamor to get themselves out of the pit and pull each other down when they see another rising higher out of the pit and so all are mired in their own filthiness. Let us now acknowledge our greatness comes from the Lord who in his might reproves nations that forsake his laws and shines on those that obey his laws. For surely only He can bend down to save us. Pray, cry out to Him, for only He can draw us out of the pit of destruction and set our feet upon the rock of truth. In hymn let us sing out to His mother which …