Skip to main content

Thursday, July 4, 2019


Thursday in the Octave of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
INDEPENDENCE DAY


Matthew, Chapter 9, verse 2
And there people brought to him a paralytic lying on a stretcher. When Jesus saw their faith*, he said to the paralytic, “Courage, child, your sins are forgiven.”

Meditate on if the healing of the paralytic or the forgiveness of his sins is a greater gift.

I believe…in the forgiveness of sins[1]
  • Some people bring a paralytic to Jesus so that he can be cured. But instead of healing him, Jesus forgives his sins. Blasphemy! At least that's what the scribes think to themselves. But Jesus is on top of things because (1) he does have the authority to forgive sins, and (2) he also has the power to heal the paralytic. Which is exactly what he does. 
  • Then Jesus stumbles upon a tax collector named Matthew (yep, that's our Matthew!), and requests that he become a follower. The Pharisees have a field day with this one. Tax collectors weren't the most popular people around town (some things never change), and the Pharisees call Jesus out for hanging out with Matthew and other sinners. 
  • Jesus will have none of that. He lets them know that he didn't come for the goody two-shoes. No, he came for the sinners. Now some of John's disciples ask Jesus why his disciples don't fast. Jesus tells them that no one mourns while the bridegroom is with them and that they will fast in mourning when the bridegroom is taken away. Confused? Don't worry, he explains with the parables of unshrunken cloth and old wineskins. Still confused? Yeah, so is almost everyone.
  • Jesus wastes no time in getting back to healing people. While he's on his way to bring a girl back to life, a woman suffering from a twelve-year-long hemorrhage touches Jesus's cloak to be made well again. Despite having a slew of people around him, Jesus feels her and says her faith has cured her. Oh yeah, and then he brings the little girl back to life.
  • News spreads fast. Next up to join the I've Been Healed by Jesus club are the two blind men who call out to "the Son of David." Okay, that gets Jesus's attention. He asks if they believe and says it's by their faith that they're healed. But then he tells them not to tell anyone. This again? 
  • Guess what? They tell people. You would think that since Jesus wants everyone to keep their mouths shut, he wouldn't drive the demon out of a mute demoniac. But Jesus is a good guy, and what do good guys do? They drive demons out of mute demoniacs.
  • Once again, the crowds are amazed. But the Pharisees accuse Jesus of driving out demons by the power of the prince of demons (a.k.a. Satan). That's not good. Jesus continues touring around, preaching at synagogues, talking about the kingdom of heaven, curing people…you know, the norm. He feels compassion toward those who follow him and says that the harvest is plenty, but the laborers are few.  Time to get more laborers.
It is evident that Christ wishes the freedom of souls from the oppression of sin and disease. Today reflect on our Declaration of Independence from the English Crown.

We hold these truths to be self-evident:


That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that, to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security. 

Prayer[2]

Almighty God, Father of all nations, for freedom you have set us free in Christ Jesus (Gal 5:1). We praise and bless you for the gift of religious liberty, the foundation of human rights, justice, and the common good. Grant to our leaders the wisdom to protect and promote our liberties; by your grace may we have the courage to defend them, for ourselves and for all those who live in this blessed land. We ask this through the intercession of Mary Immaculate, our patroness, and in the name of your Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, with whom you live and reign, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Render unto Caesar[3]


This country cannot afford to be materially rich and spiritually poor.  John F. Kennedy

Have we become a soulless Nation? Have we in the pursuit of happiness; ignored the Gospel of Life. Realizing that if we put success or liberty as greater values than life that we are serving Caesar and not God. To understand this, we need to review the US Bishops “The Gospel of Life”.

The Gospel of Life[4]


Brothers and sisters in the Lord:

At the conclusion of the 1998 ad limina visits of the bishops of the United States, our Holy Father Pope John Paul II spoke these words:

Today I believe the Lord is saying to us all: do not hesitate, do not be afraid to engage the good fight of the faith (cf. I Tim 6:12).  When we preach the liberating message of Jesus Christ we are offering the words of life to the world.  Our prophetic witness is an urgent and essential service not just to the Catholic community but to the whole human family.

In this statement we attempt to fulfill our role as teachers and pastors in proclaiming the Gospel of Life.  We are confident that the proclamation of the truth in love is an indispensable way for us to exercise our pastoral responsibility.
"Your country stands upon the world scene as a model of a democratic society at an advanced stage of development.  Your power of example carries with it heavy responsibilities.  Use it well, America!"    --Pope John Paul II, Newark, 1995
When Henry Luce published his appeal for an "American century" in 1941, he could not have known how the coming reality would dwarf his dream.  Luce hoped that the "engineers, scientists, doctors . . . builders of roads [and] teachers" of the United States would spread across the globe to promote economic success and American ideals: "a love of freedom, a feeling for the quality of opportunity, a tradition of self-reliance and independence and also cooperation." Exactly this, and much more, has happened in the decades since.  U.S. economic success has reshaped the world.  But the nobility of the American experiment flows from its founding principles, not from its commercial power.  In this century alone, hundreds of thousands of Americans have died defending those principles.  Hundreds of thousands more have lived lives of service to those principles -- both at home and on other continents -- teaching, advising and providing humanitarian assistance to people in need.  As Pope John Paul has observed, "At the center of the moral vision of [the American] founding documents is the recognition of the rights of the human person . . ."  The greatness of the United States lies "especially [in its] respect for the dignity and sanctity of human life in all conditions and at all stages of development."

Now the word of the Lord came to me saying: Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born, I consecrated you; a prophet to the nations I appointed you.
--Jeremiah 1:5

Independence Day[5]

Independence Day commemorates the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Independence Day is the most important secular holiday held in the United States. Americans take this day to celebrate all that is American, remembering the great sacrifices of our forefathers as they fought and won our independence from Great Britain. The holiday is also referred to as 4th of July, named after the date on which it is celebrated each year.

Independence Day Facts & Quotes

·         In July 1776, there were approximately 2.5 million people living in the new nation.
·         The first public reading of the Declaration of Independence didn't occur until July 8, 1776.  It was sent to the printers on July 4th.
·         The original Declaration of Independence can be viewed by visiting the National Archives, Washington D.C.  The original copy is severely faded and sits under special glass in the Rotunda for the Chambers of Freedom.
·         The Statue of Liberty is a great symbol of American Freedom. It was given to the US by France in 1886.  It was delivered in 214 crates and assembled on what is known as Liberty Island, in New York Harbor.
·         Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, to assure the survival and success of liberty. - John F. Kennedy

Independence Day Top Events and Things to Do

·         Attend or host a Barbeque.
·         Watch Fireworks. Large cities such as New York, Miami, Chicago and Los Angeles all have large firework displays.
·         Read or recite the Preamble to the Declaration of Independence.
·         Watch or attend Nathan's famous Hot Dog eating contest in Coney Island.
·         Watch a Parade. Most local cities host parades to celebrate Independence Day.
·         Contribute to the independence of a veteran

Catholic Culture Library Related Articles[6]

·         On Being Catholic American
·         The Jefferson Bible
·         What Is Patriotism?

The Patriotic Rosary[7] is prayed everywhere from within cloistered convents, to inside the Pentagon; from dangerous military fields around the globe to the quietness of the Bedroom of Apparitons and the Field of Apparitions at Caritas, which is the home of the Patriotic Rosary. The Patriotic Rosary quickly captured the hearts and attention of millions when first heard and prayed. Inspired by Our Lady of Medjugorje, the Patriotic Rosary is a powerful prayer for divine protection and mercy for our Nation and its rebirth. The history of the writing of the Patriotic Rosary origins back to 1995 at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, where the first promptings of Our Lady was felt and the impulse to form the Patriotic Rosary was given. The Patriotic Rosary, the Prayer to Heal Our Land, and the “Seven Novenas for the Reconciling of Ourselves, our Families and our Nation Back to God,” all for the rebirth of America, have the grounds at Caritas of Birmingham as their home. It is Caritas of Birmingham, whose founder, known as A Friend of Medjugorje, wrote the Patriotic Rosary, and that also operates the Official Medjugorje Site. It was a surprise in 1988, after many prayers near the Pine Tree for the healing of our Nation that Our Lady began to write a beautiful story, through Her Medjugorje apparitions at Caritas, telling us that a Nation and its healing, represented by the Pine in the Field, would come only through the individual, represented by the family bed. In those first apparitions, Our Lady appeared in the Bedroom over the family bed, then on Thanksgiving Day, November 24, 1988, She appeared near the Pine, then back to the Bedroom for the remaining two months of daily apparitions. This spoke clearly that our Nation would be healed through strong marriages forming strong holy families raising strong individuals which will heal and make a strong nation. Our Nation’s future depends on the healing of the family.


Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         90 Days for our Nation, 54-day rosary-Day 50
·         Novena to the Holy Face Day 8
·         Go to MASS
·         Watch “Called and Chosen” Father Vincent R. Capodanno on EWTN. (4PM)




* A person with fear of the Lord is filled with peace, faith, hope and love.
[1]
[3] Render unto Caesar, Charles J. Chaput
[4]http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/abortion/living-the-gospel-of-life.cfm
[6]https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/calendar/day.cfm?date=2019-07-04

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Sunday, November 11, 2018

FEAST OF SAINT MARTIN/VETERANS DAY

Acts, Chapter 26, Verse 5-7 5They have known about me from the start, if they are willing to testify, that I have lived my life as a Pharisee, the strictest party of our religion. 6But now I am standing trial because of my hope in the promise made by God to our ancestors. 7 Our twelve tribes hope to attain to that promise as they fervently worship God day and night; and on account of this hope I am accused by Jews, O king.
Paul clearly explains that his entire life was in preparation for the hope of Israel, Christ Jesus, who Israel did not recognize as the son of God. Paul states that the prophets and Moses had foretold that the Christ would suffer, and as first to be raised from the dead, he would proclaim light to both God’s people and the Gentiles. The resurrection is God’s promise to Israel. Paul like Christ ultimately was a victim of intolerance.[1]
Twenty Fifth Sunday after Pentecost[2]
GOSPEL Matthew 13: 24 – 30
At that time Jesus spoke this parable…

Tuesday, November 4, 2019

Introduction to Psalms[1]

The Bible for some is stuffy, overblown, and boring. So and so, son of so and so did such and such a thing to this ruler and then X, Y, and Z happened. (Snore.) Well, that may be a Dull Fest, but Psalms will set the record straight. Think fire and brimstone, giant sea monsters, cannibals, and even drunks. Yeah, ancient poetry is juicy. Psalms is one of the longest books of the Bible, but that's because it's actually a collection of 150 poems about life back in the day. We're talking Real Housewives of the Negev. The Bible mostly comprises stories, prophecies, and laws, but Psalms brings the poetic punch. Most of the Psalms are attributed to David, the Israelites' greatest and most famous king. Turns out King David was a poet too—yeah, he did know it. The Psalms are all written in Hebrew, and have been jazzed up, classed up, and mistranslated ever since they were written starting 3,000 years ago. Part of Psalms' appeal is its poetry. If Levi…

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Ash Wednesday

Deuteronomy, Chapter 18, Verse 21-22 21 Should you say to yourselves, “How can we recognize that a word is one the LORD has not spoken?”, 22 if a prophet speaks in the name of the LORD but the word does not come true, it is a word the LORD did not speak. The prophet has spoken it presumptuously; do not fear him.
Even saints at times may have spoken presumptuously. Let us meditate on the words of Padre Pio, 
“Love and fear must go united together, fear without love becomes cowardice. Love without fear becomes presumption. When there is love without fear, love runs without prudence and without restraint, without taking care where it is going.”
This is the great beauty of the Holy Spirit for it tells us when even a very holy person speaks not every word they speak comes from God. We error sometimes in this way, making men into gods; but a heart that is filled with the spirit of God is filled with quiet joy and even if the person were to be imprisoned, they can find true freedom…

Saturday, November 2, 2019

First Saturday ALL SOULS DAY- DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME ENDS

Wisdom, Chapter 3, Verse 9 Those who trust in him shall understand truth, and the faithful shall abide with him in love: Because grace and mercy are with his holy ones, and his care is with the elect.
Immortality is the reward of the righteous, yet in the old tradition suffering, childlessness, and early death are often seen as a divine punishment. The author of the book of Wisdom affirms that, for the righteous, sufferings are not punishments but purification and opportunities to show fidelity, whereas for the wicked suffering is truly a punishment.[1]
First Saturday Devotion[2]
Five consecutive Saturdays in reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary
The practice of the First Saturday devotion was requested by Our Lady of Fatima, who appeared to three shepherd children in Fatima, Portugal, multiple times starting in 1917. She said to Lucia, the oldest of the three children: “I shall come to ask . . . that on the First Saturday of ever…

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

FEAST OF ST. JOHN OF CAPISTRANO

Job, Chapter 21, Verse 28 And to mortals he said: See: the fear of the Lord is wisdom; and avoiding evil is understanding. The moral of the story is that wisdom lives with God. To fear the scope and power of this divine wisdom is to be truly wise in a human sense. Kind of how a truly wise man knows that he knows nothing.[1] St. John of Capistrano[2] St. John was born in 1386 at Capistrano in the Italian Province of the Abruzzi. His father was a German knight and died when he was still young. When war broke out between Perugia and Malatesta in 1416, St. John tried to broker a peace. Unfortunately, his opponents ignored the truce and St. John became a prisoner of war. On the death of his wife he entered the order of Friars Minor, was ordained and began to lead a very penitential life. John became a disciple of Saint Bernadine of Siena and a noted preacher.

·The world at the time was in need of strong men to work for salvation of souls. ·Thirty percent of the p…

Friday, November 15, 2019

Psalm 49, Verse 6-7 6 Why should I fear in evil days, with the iniquity of my assailants surrounding me, 7of those who trust in their wealth and boast of their abundant riches?
Trust in Christ our savior and live the virtues of our Lady: humility, generosity, chastity, patience, temperance and love of fellow man. Do not put your faith in coin; for the bankruptcy of our cultural heart is that we allow the innocent to be killed in this nation. God cries over the sacrifices of future unborn children for the dreams of the mother. No amount of future happiness or gain in independence is worth the life of an innocent. Know that life is greater than liberty and liberty is greater than wealth.
Beloved: Teach and urge these things. Whoever teaches something different and does not agree with the sound words of our Lord Jesus Christ and the religious teaching is conceited, understanding nothing, and has a morbid disposition for arguments and verbal disputes. From these come envy, rivalry, insults,…

Friday, November 8, 2019

Psalm 14, Verse 5 They have good reason, then, to fear; God is with the company of the just.
Those who have no fear of God are masters of the soft enslavement; thus, keeping the poor in place and filling their own coffers and the coffers of their fellow enlightened ones. Who are these enlighten ones? Those who support, the culture of death, which kill excess populations via abortions, wars, drugs and the enslavement of the mind via an education system that keeps the poor in place. We are talking about those in control of the worlds systems who would give the poor only enough to survive yet not enough to empower them to greatness. Their greatest fear is a change in the water level of the swamp. The greatest tragedy in all of this is a sense of complacency in the enslaved; were we to be freed of our bondages from unclean water, processed foods, overbearing taxes, unjust laws, and oppressing loans; to include the student loan system; we would most likely cry as the Israelites did for the f…

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

ST JOHN PAUL II

Job, Chapter 21, Verse 9 Their homes are safe, without fear, and the rod of God is not upon them.
With the current political climate of today-The Dark State, Turkey, Sanctuary Cities, Gangs etc.; we may not be feeling safe in our homes. We may feel God’s rod is upon us. Yet, we learn that God does not wish to destroy us but bring about the best in us. The wages of sin are usually destruction, but God is mercy. As in the parable of the wheat and tares God allows the weeds to grow with the wheat. We often ask with Job, “Why do the wicked keep on living, grow old, become mighty in power? Mercy! Zophar & His Asps[1]
·Zophar decides to beat a dead horse. ·Not literally. ·He tells Job that the wicked get what they deserve from God.  ·For good measure, he adds that the venom of asps will poison people's stomachs and kill the sinners. Well that's graphic.
Job Refutes Zophar
·Job sticks to his guns. ·The wicked, he says, go unpunished all the time. Not that he's cool with …

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

SAINT JOSAPHAT-FULL BEAVER MOON
Psalm 40, verse 2-4 2 Surely, I wait for the LORD; who bends down to me and hears my cry, 3 Draws me up from the pit of destruction, out of the muddy clay, Sets my feet upon rock, steadies my steps, 4 And puts a new song in my mouth, a hymn to our God. Many shall look on in fear and they shall trust in the LORD.
So many in this nation have given in to modernism and we have descended into the pit of destruction. We see the leaders of this Nation clamor to get themselves out of the pit and pull each other down when they see another rising higher out of the pit and so all are mired in their own filthiness. Let us now acknowledge our greatness comes from the Lord who in his might reproves nations that forsake his laws and shines on those that obey his laws. For surely only He can bend down to save us. Pray, cry out to Him, for only He can draw us out of the pit of destruction and set our feet upon the rock of truth. In hymn let us sing out to His mother which …

Thursday, October 24, 2019

UNITED NATIONS/BOLOGNA/TRIPE DAY

Job, Chapter 31, Verse 34 Because I feared the great multitude and the scorn of the clans terrified me—then I should have remained silent, and not come out of doors!
Job’s present protest is made, not in spite of hidden sins which he had been unwilling to disclose, but out of genuine innocence. He is claiming that his only fear was that of the Lord and that all his life he has followed the law of God in the nine areas of moral concern.
To practice righteousness in the areas of moral concern we must strive for humility and its source in knowing that all goodness comes from the Spirit. 
Areas of Moral uprightness[1]avoid these like the plague
1.Falsehood and deceit 2.Exploitation of the land. 3.Lust and Adultery. 4.Rights of servants (We are all made in the image of God) 5.Hardness toward the poor and needy. 6.Idolatry. Social injustice is the reverse side of idolatry. 7.Hatred of enemies. Don’t curse. Repay evil with good. 8.Hospitality. In ancient society without …