Wednesday, July 13, 2022

 NATIONAL FRENCH FRY DAY-FULL BUCK MOON 

Mark, Chapter 5, Verse 15:

As they approached Jesus, they caught sight of the man who had been possessed by Legion, sitting there clothed and in his right mind. And they were seized with FEAR. 

We fear the demonic and we fear the power of those greater than the demonic. Pray for Holy fear.

 

St. Jude refers to a type of Holy fear we have when we witness the greatness of God as mentioned in this verse. “On those who waver, have mercy; save others by snatching them out of the fire; on others have mercy with fear, abhorring even the outer garment stained by the flesh.” (Jude 1:22-23)

 

EXORCISM IN THE NEW TESTAMENT[1]: Assuming the reality of demoniac possession, for which the authority of Christ is pledged (see Demoniacal Possession Obsession), it is to be observed that Jesus appealed to His power over demons as one of the recognised signs of Messiahship (Matt., xii, 23, 28; Luke, xi, 20). He cast out demons, He declared, by the finger or spirit of God, not, as His adversaries alleged, by collusion with the prince of demons (Matt., xii, 24, 27; Mark, iii, 22; Luke, xi, 15,19); and that He exercised no mere delegated power, but a personal authority that was properly His own, is clear from the direct and imperative way in which He commands the demon to depart (Mark, ix, 24; cf. i, 25 etc.): “He cast out the spirits with his word, and he healed all that were sick” (Matt., viii, 16). Sometimes, as with the daughter of the Canaanean woman, the exorcism took place from a distance (Matt., xv, 22 sqq.; Mark, vii, 25). Sometimes again the spirits expelled were allowed to express their recognition of Jesus as “the Holy One of God” (Mark, i, 24) and to complain that He had come to torment them “before the time”, i.e. the time of their final punishment (Matt., viii, 29 sqq.; Luke, viii, 28 sqq.). If demoniac possession was generally accompanied by some disease, yet the two were not confounded by Christ or the Evangelists. In Luke, xiii, 32, for example, the Master Himself expressly distinguishes between the expulsion of evil spirits and the curing of diseases.

Christ also empowered the Apostles and Disciples to cast out demons in His name while He Himself was still on earth (Matt., x, 1 and 8; Mark, vi, 7; Luke, ix, 1; x, 17), and to believers generally He promised the same power (Mark, xvi, 17). But the efficacy of this delegated power was conditional, as we see from the fact that the Apostles themselves were not always successful in their exorcisms: certain kinds of spirits, as Christ explained, could only be cast out by prayer and fasting (Matt., xvii, 15, 20; Mark, ix, 27, 28; Luke, ix, 40). In other words the success of exorcism by Christians, in Christ’s name, is subject to the same general conditions on which both the efficacy of prayer and the use of charismatic power depend. Yet conspicuous success was promised (Mark, xvi, 17). St. Paul (Acts, xvi, 18; xix, 12), and, no doubt, the other Apostles and Disciples, made use regularly, as occasion arose, of their exorcising power, and the Church has continued to do so uninterruptedly to the present day.

It Is Better to Fry in This Life Then the Next[2]

Whether you call them French Fries, Chips, Finger Chips, or French-Fried Potatoes, this delicious treat is loved around the world, and French Fries Day celebrates them. Not to be confused with the American Chips, which are thinly sliced pieces of potato fried until crisp, French Fries are the delicious result of batons of potato cut to various thicknesses and then fried in oil. The outside of this staple companion food to hamburgers and other grease-ball favorites generally have a golden texture, varying from soft to crispy, and most often served with little more than a dusting of salt.

History of the French Fry

French Fries are one of many foods whose name is most misleading, as the origins of this fat fried food seem to be in Belgium. The story of their creation can be found in a family manuscript dated 1781, which reveals that potatoes were originally cut into the shape of fish and served in lieu of the fish normally caught in a series of small villages in Belgium. It seems the river had frozen over and the fish they normally caught and fried were unable to be caught. Why theyre called French is often attributed to troops coming over during World War I who got their hands-on Belgian Fries. The official language of the Belgian army at that time was French, and as a result the men thought they were in France rather than Belgium. Interestingly, in that region of the world, they are still called Flemish Fries to further complicate matters. Now these treats are loved the world round, even becoming the national snack’ of the Netherlands.

How to Celebrate French Fries Day

With the popularity of French Fry, its not surprising that the world has come up with as many different varieties of this delicious food as you could imagine. So, one of the best ways to celebrate French Fries Day is to host a party dedicated to celebrating the international menu the fried potato has created. The simplest variation is simply to put chopped raw onions in some ketchup and eat them up like they do in the Netherlands. For the more adventurous, try some of the varieties below!

Canadian Poutine

This recipe is a classic way to have French Fries, originating in Canada. This dish is incredibly decadent, combining the crispy soft texture of the French Fries with a rich beef gravy, and topped with cheese curds.

American Bacon Cheeseburger Classic

There is little Americans love more than to add cheese and bacon to just about anything. French fries are no exception, there is little that is as well-loved as a rich, greasy accompaniment to any meal. To make this classic you start with a basic of fries, and layer on bacon, chopped onions, cheese, and ground hamburger before tossing them in the oven just long enough for everything to get melty. Then grab a handful and dig in!

Greek French Fries

The Mediterranean rarely fail at making an already delicious food rich and full of the smells of home. If you love the classic Greek flavors of parmigiano-reggiano or romano cheese, garlic, and oregano, then these fries are going to leave you smiling. The key ingredients here are Extra Virgin Olive Oil to fry them in, after which you toss them in garlic salt, Greek Oregano, and your choice of cheese such as those mentioned ahead. To get the full impact youre going to want to stick to the white crumbly cheese of the region, the truly adventurous might use Mazithra cheese.

These are a few dishes that can help enhance French Fries Day, and really bring out the amazing versatility of this centuries old treat. So, get out your deep fryer, chop up some potatoes, and celebrate French Fries Day by eating yourself into a starch filled stupor!

mussels and fries[3]

Moules-frites—the Belgians discovered a perfect marriage. They steam their mussels in simple marinière style (flavored with a little chopped onion, celery, carrot, parsley, bay leaf, and thyme), and then serve heaping mounds of them.

The First Cat Show[4]

Have you ever noticed that some people may be very, very good at lying with their lips; yet by their gestures or body language you can always see the truth? This may be the reason we have such a great affection for pets who bodily speak the truth of their own likings. Let us ask our Lord whose hands were nailed to the wood and can no longer gesture---to allow us to be His hands thus making our own gestures speak His language of love.

A British man, Mr. Harrison Weir, got the idea for the first cat show. He was a Fellow of the Horticultural Society, and artist, and a cat lover. He developed a schedule, classes, and prizes for the show. He also created the "Points of Excellence" -- a guideline for how the cats would be judged.

The Crystal Palace, in south-east London, was chosen for the site of the first show. (Dog shows had already been held there). A man named Mr. F. Wilson was appointed manager of the show for setting up the Crystal Palace. The judges were Mr. Weir, his brother John Weir, and the Reverend J. Macdona.

The show was held on July 13, 1871. Nearly 160 cats were shown. The cats were mostly short-haired, and were divided into different color groups. Pedigrees were not around at this time. It wasn't until 1887 that the National Cat Club formed in Britain and began tracking the parentage of cats. The prize cats did not have their photos taken, but were drawn by an artist to record them.

The show attracted a great deal of interest. Cat shows soon became fashionable in Britain, particularly because they were patronized by Queen Victoria, who owned a pair of Blue Persians. In the 1870s, larger and larger cat shows were held in Britain. In 1895 the first official cat show was held in Madison Square Garden, New York.

Catechism of the Catholic Church

PART TWO: THE CELEBRATION OF THE CHRISTIAN MYSTERY

SECTION ONE THE SACRAMENTAL ECONOMY

CHAPTER TWO-THE SACRAMENTAL CELEBRATION OF THE PASCHAL MYSTERY

Article 2 LITURGICAL DIVERSITY AND THE UNITY OF THE MYSTERY

Liturgical traditions and the catholicity of the Church

1200 From the first community of Jerusalem until the parousia, it is the same Paschal mystery that the Churches of God, faithful to the apostolic faith, celebrate in every place. the mystery celebrated in the liturgy is one, but the forms of its celebration are diverse.

1201 The mystery of Christ is so unfathomably rich that it cannot be exhausted by its expression in any single liturgical tradition. the history of the blossoming and development of these rites witnesses to a remarkable complementarity. When the Churches lived their respective liturgical traditions in the communion of the faith and the sacraments of the faith, they enriched one another and grew in fidelity to Tradition and to the common mission of the whole Church.

1202 The diverse liturgical traditions have arisen by very reason of the Church's mission. Churches of the same geographical and cultural area came to celebrate the mystery of Christ through particular expressions characterized by the culture: in the tradition of the "deposit of faith," in liturgical symbolism, in the organization of fraternal communion, in the theological understanding of the mysteries, and in various forms of holiness. Through the liturgical life of a local church, Christ, the light and salvation of all peoples, is made manifest to the particular people and culture to which that Church is sent and in which she is rooted. the Church is catholic, capable of integrating into her unity, while purifying them, all the authentic riches of cultures.

1203 The liturgical traditions or rites presently in use in the Church are the Latin (principally the Roman rite, but also the rites of certain local churches, such as the Ambrosian rite, or those of certain religious orders) and the Byzantine, Alexandrian or Coptic, Syriac, Armenian, Maronite and Chaldean rites. In "faithful obedience to tradition, the sacred Council declares that Holy Mother Church holds all lawfully recognized rites to be of equal right and dignity, and that she wishes to preserve them in the future and to foster them in every way."

Liturgy and culture

1204 The celebration of the liturgy, therefore, should correspond to the genius and culture of the different peoples. In order that the mystery of Christ be "made known to all the nations . . . to bring about the obedience of faith," it must be proclaimed, celebrated, and lived in all cultures in such a way that they themselves are not abolished by it, but redeemed and fulfilled: It is with and through their own human culture, assumed and transfigured by Christ, that the multitude of God's children has access to the Father, in order to glorify him in the one Spirit.

1205 "In the liturgy, above all that of the sacraments, there is an immutable part, a part that is divinely instituted and of which the Church is the guardian, and parts that can be changed, which the Church has the power and on occasion also the duty to adapt to the cultures of recently evangelized peoples."

1206 "Liturgical diversity can be a source of enrichment, but it can also provoke tensions, mutual misunderstandings, and even schisms. In this matter it is clear that diversity must not damage unity. It must express only fidelity to the common faith, to the sacramental signs that the Church has received from Christ, and to hierarchical communion. Cultural adaptation also requires a conversion of heart and even, where necessary, a breaking with ancestral customs incompatible with the Catholic faith."

Every Wednesday is Dedicated to St. Joseph

The Italian culture has always had a close association with St. Joseph perhaps you could make Wednesdays centered around Jesus’s Papa. Plan an Italian dinner of pizza or spaghetti after attending Mass as most parishes have a Wednesday evening Mass. You could even do carry out to help restaurants. If you are adventurous, you could do the Universal Man Plan: St. Joseph style. Make the evening a family night perhaps it could be a game night. Whatever you do make the day special.

·       Devotion to the 7 Joys and Sorrows of St. Joseph

·       Do the St. Joseph Universal Man Plan.

·       Total Consecration to St. Joseph Day 4

Full Buck Moon 

According to the almanac today we are having a Full Buck Moon; plan to spend some time if you are not a hunter out hiking with your children or grandchildren.

                                            

Daily Devotions

·       Unite in the work of the Porters of St. Joseph by joining them in fasting: Victims of clergy sexual abuse

                                            

·       Novena to Our Lady of Mount Carmel-Day 7

·       Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus

·       Offering to the sacred heart of Jesus

·       Let Freedom Ring Day 7

·       Drops of Christ’s Blood

·       Universal Man Plan

·       Nineveh 90-Day 89

·       Rosary



[1] https://www.catholic.com/encyclopedia/exorcism

[3] Schultz, Patricia. 1,000 Places to See Before You Die


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