Wednesday, November 8, 2023

 Each day between November 1 and November 8, this gains a plenary indulgence that can only be applied to the poor souls in purgatory. Any other time of year this gains a partial indulgence. See Praying for the Dead and Gaining Indulgences During November for more information about indulgences for the Poor Souls.

1 Maccabees, Chapter 16, Verse 6

John and his people took their position against the enemy. Seeing that his people were AFRAID to cross the wadi, John crossed first. When his men saw this, they crossed over after him.

 

The narrative is nearing its end. Simon, the last of the Maccabean brothers to rule over the Jewish people, is getting too old to lead the troops into battle. He passes on the military leadership to his sons Judas and John, who, like real leaders, lead from the front. He is the first to step into danger.[1]

Even in our present day we can see similarities in our own heroes and villains. What should we take away from this book? The contest described in this book is a struggle, not simply between Jew and Gentile, but between those who would uphold the law and those, Jews or Gentiles, who would destroy it. The books severest condemnation goes, not to the Seleucid politicians, but to the lawless apostates from among the Jewish people, adversaries of Judas and his brothers, who are models of faith and loyalty.

Fear binds us[2]

There is so much fear and agony in us. Fear of people, fear of God, and much raw, undefined, free-floating anxiety. I wonder if fear is not our main obstacle to prayer.

When we enter the presence of God and start to sense that huge reservoir of fear in us, we want to run away into the many distractions that our busy world offers abundantly.

But we should not be afraid of our fears. We can confront them, give words to them, cry out to God, and lead our fears into the presence of the One who says: “Don’t be afraid, it is I.”
(Henri Nouwen, Spiritual Direction, 58)

Hope is to each of us what sunshine is to a garden.

Consecration to St. Joseph[3]


 

Today would be a good day to start or renew the 33-day Total Consecration to St. Joseph that would end on December 10th The Feast of Loreto (the holy home of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph).


St. Louis de Montfort (1673-1716) popularized a consecration to Jesus through Mary, recognizing that placing one’s life into the hands of Mary as mother and queen would provide a surer way of coming close to her Son. De Montfort developed a 33-day preparation period and act of consecration, renewing one’s baptismal vows, on a major feast day of Our Lady. Drawing upon this important devotional practice, Father Donald Calloway proposes a similar consecration to her spouse, St. Joseph, in his new book, Consecration to St. Joseph: The Wonders of Our Spiritual Father (Marian Press, 2020). The book leads through a 30-day preparation period through its three sections, the first of which examines Joseph’s titles in his litany, the second of which looks at the wonders related to his life and role in the Church, and the final of which offers prayers to him. Although his arrangement may be new, the book contains acts of consecration to St. Joseph written by St. Alphonsus Liguori, St. Bernadine of Siena, and St. Peter Julian Eymard.

Father Calloway explains the importance of this devotion to St. Joseph and why one should make a consecration to him: It “means that you acknowledge that he is your spiritual father, and that you want to be like him. To show it, you entrust yourself entirely to his paternal care so that he can lovingly help you acquire his virtues and become holy. Total consecration to St. Joseph means you make a formal act of filial entrustment to your spiritual father so that he can take care of your spiritual wellbeing and lead you to God. The person who consecrates himself to St. Joseph wants to be as close to their spiritual father as possible, to the point of resembling him in virtue and holiness Saint Joseph, in turn, will give those consecrated to him loving attention, protection, and guidance”. For those who have already done the consecration to Jesus through Mary, Father Calloway recommends this consecration as well: “God desires that all his children be committed to the love and care of a mother and a father” (ibid.).

Father Calloway rightly points out that now is the time of St. Joseph. We need Joseph right now as a protector of the Church so that she may experience renewal. We also need him as a protector of purity and the sanctity of family. We need him as a guide for working and living in the world in faith and obedience. In order to strengthen our daily devotion to him, I would also propose the following prayer based on the Bible’s references to his role (including the prefigurement of the Old Testament):

Joseph, Son of David, you are the just man the Lord placed over His house. You did what the angel commanded and so we go to you in time of need.  O adopted father of Jesus, pray to your Son for us. Amen.

Cappuccino Day[4]

Italy is famous for the variety of coffees it produces. Cappuccinos are loved among coffee lovers and despite its vague history, many people still appreciate the comfort it brings. Thus, comes a happy day called Cappuccino Day, where people from all over can order a frothy and whipped cup of coffee and eat with whatever meal they’re having. Let’s take a look at how Cappuccino Day came to be.

The name “Cappuccino” came from the Capuchin Friars, a minor order of friars within the Catholic Church, who in the 16th century was well known for their missionary work helping the poor and were dedicated to extreme austerity, poverty, and simplicity. Wearing a brown robe with a pointed hood, it is believed that the name stemmed from a specific person in the order, Marco d’Aviano. According to the Telegraph, when an Ottoman Turk army tried marching into Vienna in 1683, d’Aviano united the outnumbered Christian troops and made them victorious in defending Vienna. The legend says that after the Turks fled, they left behind Ottoman coffee, and because the Christians found it to be bitter, they sweetened it with milk and honey and named it after the Order of Capuchins. Another source says that the idea of the cappuccino drink appears to have originated in the 1700’s, in the “Kapuziner” coffee houses in Austria, which contained coffee with cream and sugar and eventually added spices. However, the cappuccino we know today was invented in Italy during the 1900’s after the invention of the espresso machine gained popularity. The first record of the cappuccino appeared in the 1930’s. After World War II, the espresso machine improved, and so changed the process of making cappuccinos, which now have steamed and frothed cream and thus spread its popularity around the world.

How to Celebrate Cappuccino Day

Buy a cappuccino at your favorite cafe. If you’d rather have a cup at home, get an espresso machine and make a cup yourself. Or if you love the process of making cappuccinos, look up famous baristas and be wowed by their ability to make beautiful creations with coffee. Cappuccinos are one of the hardest drinks to make, but their elegance and frothy taste will be sure to have you wanting a cup for yourself. If you’re a lover of taking photos of your food, take a picture of your cappuccino and hashtag #CappuccinoDay to show to your friends.

Catechism of the Catholic Church

PART TWO: THE CELEBRATION OF THE CHRISTIAN MYSTERY

SECTION TWO-THE SEVEN SACRAMENTS OF THE CHURCH

CHAPTER THREE-THE SACRAMENTS AT THE SERVICE OF COMMUNION

ARTICLE 6-THE SACRAMENT OF HOLY ORDERS

1536 Holy Orders is the sacrament through which the mission entrusted by Christ to his apostles continues to be exercised in the Church until the end of time: thus it is the sacrament of apostolic ministry. It includes three degrees: episcopate, presbyterate, and diaconate.

(On the institution and mission of the apostolic ministry by Christ, see above, no. 874 ff. Here only the sacramental means by which this ministry is handed on will be treated.)

Every Wednesday is Dedicated to St. Joseph

The Italian culture has always had a close association with St. Joseph perhaps you could make Wednesdays centered around Jesus’s Papa. Plan an Italian dinner of pizza or spaghetti after attending Mass as most parishes have a Wednesday evening Mass. You could even do carry out to help restaurants. If you are adventurous, you could do the Universal Man Plan: St. Joseph style. Make the evening a family night perhaps it could be a game night. Whatever you do make the day special.

·         Devotion to the 7 Joys and Sorrows of St. Joseph

·         Do the St. Joseph Universal Man Plan.

·         Novena to St. Joseph

Daily Devotions

·         Unite in the work of the Porters of St. Joseph by joining them in fasting: Today's Fast: Protection of Traditional Marriages

·         Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus

·         Offering to the sacred heart of Jesus

·         Harvey Wallbanger Day



·         Drops of Christ’s Blood

·         Universal Man Plan

·         Roast Dinner Day



·         Rosary




Thursday, Nov 30: 8:30-9:30pm ET

Upcoming Live Event: Sons of the Father
with Fr. Larry Richards

Register | Learn more

In a world where men feel alone and friendless, it’s time to kick isolation to the curb.


We men are starved for action and identity. But the culture can’t give it to us. It’s time to cut through the noise. To get back to basics.


Deep down, do you feel pointless and worthless? Like the best you can do for the world is sacrifice your life?


Time out. We’re worth infinitely more than that.


In Jesus, we are sons of God our Father. Every man is hounded by God's relentless love. You’re a man. You matter.


Join us live online for a free, 1-hour event hosted by Fr. Larry Richards, and HeroicMen. Let’s be clear: this isn't a feel-good happy hour. This is a kick-in-the-pants to sit up, step up, and claim your God-given identity.


We're going live on Thursday, November 30, at 8:30 pm to get clear on what Sons of the Father means.


This needs to get real, real fast. We’re not kidding when we say lives are at stake: self-harm rates and loneliness are an epidemic among men. It needs to stop. The Heroic Identity: Sons of the Father livestream is the line: This is where we stand. Here is where it ends.


Flip the script, change the game, and get off the sidelines of your own life. It's not about words; it's about action. Inspired by the Catholic faith, this is your call to return to identity as a son of God.

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