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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Rogation Tuesday Acts, Chapter 16, verse 27-30 27 When the jailer woke up and saw the prison doors wide open, he drew [his] sword...

Friday, June 3, 2016

Saturday, June 4, 2016 Immaculate Heart of Mary

Mark, Chapter 11, Verse 18
The chief priests and the scribes came to hear of it and were seeking a way to put him to death, yet they feared him because the whole crowd was astonished at his teaching.

This was after Jesus had overturned the money changers tables. The priests were not afraid of the man Jesus, for they did not know or care if He was the messiah. They only respected money, power, or the ability to sway or manipulate the crowd.

In this chapter of Mark’s gospel he also included the story of the fig tree. The fig tree was cursed by Jesus before He entered the temple because it although was healthy and looked as if it held much fruit was barren. After the incident in the temple the same tree had withered and died because it did not produce. It did not live up to its created purpose.

Mark records it thus, “Early in the morning, as they were walking along, they saw the fig tree withered to its roots. Peter remembered and said to him, “Rabbi, look! The fig tree that you cursed has withered.” Jesus said to them in reply, “Have faith in God. Amen, I say to you, whoever says to this mountain, ‘Be lifted up and thrown into the sea,’ and does not doubt in his heart but believes that what he says will happen; it shall be done for him. Therefore I tell you, all that you ask for in prayer, believe that you will receive it and it shall be yours. When you stand to pray, forgive anyone against whom you have a grievance, so that your heavenly Father may in turn forgive you your transgressions.”

A man then who believes, without fear, and has total faith can move mountains; go therefore with all faith and produce the fruit for which you were created.

Immaculate Heart of Mary[1]

The Feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary is a devotional name used to refer to the interior life of the Blessed Virgin Mary, her joys and sorrows, her virtues and hidden perfections, and above all, her virginal love for God the Father, her maternal love for her son Jesus, and her compassionate love for all persons.  Two elements are essential to the devotion, Mary’s interior life and the beauties of her soul, and Mary’s virginal body.  According to Roman Catholic theology, soul and body are necessary to the constitution of man.  It was in 1855, that the Mass of the Most Pure Heart of Mary formally became a part of the Catholic practice.  Traditionally, the heart of Mary in artwork is depicted with seven wounds or swords, in homage to the seven sorrows of Mary.  Also, roses or another type of flower may be wrapped around the heart.  

Veneration of the Immaculate Heart of Mary generally coincides with the worship of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus.  However, there is a difference that explains the Roman Catholic devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.  The devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus is especially directed to the “Divine Heart”, as overflowing with love for humanity.  In the devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary, on the other hand, the attraction is the love of her Immaculate Heart for Jesus and for God.  
A second difference is the nature of the devotion itself.  In devotion to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, the Roman Catholic venerates in a sense of love, responding to love.  In devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary, love is formed from study and imitation of Mary’s yes to God as the mother of Jesus.  In this devotion, love is more the result, than the “object” of the devotion; the object being rather to love God and Jesus by uniting one’s self to Mary for this purpose and by imitating her virtues, to help one achieve this.  

History of the devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary is connected in many ways to that of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.  Christians were drawn to the love and virtues of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, and this paved the devotion from the beginning.  Early Christians had compassion for the Virgin Mary, and the Gospels recount prophecy delivered to her at Jesus’ presentation in the temple, and that her heart would be pierced with a sword.  The image of the Immaculate Heart of Mary with the pierced heart is the most popular representation.  St. John’s Gospel further invites us to the attention of Mary’s heart with its depiction of Mary at the foot of the cross at Jesus’ crucifixion.  St. Augustine tells us that Mary was more blessed in having born Christ in her heart, than in having conceived him in the flesh.



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