Saturday, May 25, 2019



1 Kings Chapter 19, Verse 3-4
3Elijah was afraid and fled for his life, going to Beer-sheba of Judah. He left his servant there 4 and went a day’s journey into the wilderness, until he came to a solitary broom tree and sat beneath it. He prayed for death: “Enough, LORD! Take my life, for I am no better than my ancestors.”

Depression is real for saints as it is for sinners; as you power through it you may come to realize that depression is really just angered directed at yourself.
Tired of Life[1]
I. The wish for death, the weariness of life, is a phenomenon extremely common, and common because it arises from a multitude of causes; but those causes all run up into this, that, as Scripture expresses it, ‘man is born to sorrow, as the sparks fly upward.’ Rebuke this feeling as you will, you must deal with it as a fact, and as an experience of human life. The sense of failure, the conviction that the evils around us are stronger than we can grapple with, the apparent non-atonement for the intolerable wrong—there are hours when, under the incidents of these trials, even the noblest Christian finds it hard to keep his faith strong and his hope unclouded. Take any man who has spoken words of burning faithfulness, or done deeds of high courage in a mean and lying world, and the chances are that his life’s story was clouded by failure or closed in martyrdom.

II. In this chapter we have God’s own gracious way of dealing with this sad but far from uncommon despondency. —Elijah had fled into the wilderness, flung himself down under a juniper tree, and requested that he might die. How gently and with what Divine compassion did God deal with his despair! He spread for Elijah a table in the wilderness, and helped him forward on his way; only then, when his bodily powers had been renewed, when his faith had been strengthened, does the question come, ‘What doest thou here, Elijah?’ The vision and the still small voice may have brought home to the heart of Elijah one reason at least why he had failed. He had tried taunts and violence in the cause of God; he had seized heaven’s sword of retribution, and made it red with human blood. He had not learned that violence is hateful to God; he had to be taught that Elijah’s spirit is very different from Christ’s Spirit. And when God has taught him this lesson, He then gives him His message and His consolation. The message is, ‘Go, do My work again’; the consolation is, ‘Things are not so bad as to human eyes they seem.’

III. Those who suffer from despondency, should (1) look well to see whether the causes of their failure and their sorrow are not removable; (2) embrace the truth that when they have honestly done their best, then the success or the failure of their work is not in their own hands. Work is man’s; results are God’s. Dean Farrar.

Give me the ability to see as Christ sees

As gentiles who are God-fearing, we must accept our salvation by living the Shema Israel daily seeking to love Him with our whole heart, mind, soul and strength. This morning as I said the Shema Israel, I thought Lord I don’t understand how to love you with my whole soul, but I decided to say the prayer looking in the mirror at myself.  I then said, “Hear O Israel that the Lord our God is one, and you shall love the Lord your God with your whole heart, (I touched my heart) and with your whole mind, (I touched the side of my temple) with your whole soul (I instinctively touched my eyes; which are the windows of the soul) and flexed my arms and said with my whole strength.  It was then that I realized what the Lord had revealed to me.  My eyes: with my eyes I see things as a child of God, or as a selfish clot. With my eyes I see the good in the world or I see things that I want. With my eyes I see another human as a beloved or as an object to be used. Yes, indeed with my eyes my soul does exist and I will now love the Lord my God with my whole eyes which are the windows of the soul.

The Mediocre Man[2]

·         The truly mediocre man admirers everything a little and nothing with warmth He considers every affirmation insolent, because every affirmation excludes the contradictory proposition. But if you are slightly friendly and slightly hostile to all things, he will consider you wise and reserved. The mediocre man says there is good and evil in all things, and that we must not be absolute in our judgments.
·         If you strongly affirm the truth, the mediocre man will say that you have too much confidence in yourself.
·         The mediocre man regrets that the Christian religion has dogmas. He would like it to teach ethics, and if you tell him that its code of morals comes from its dogmas as the consequence comes from the principle, he will answer that you exaggerateIf the word exaggeration did not exist, the mediocre man would invent it.
·         The mediocre man appears habitually modest. He cannot be humble, or he would cease to be mediocre.
·         The humble man scorns all lies, even where glorified by the whole earth, and he bows the knee before every truthIf the naturally mediocre man becomes seriously Christian, he ceases absolutely to be mediocre
·         The man who loves is never mediocre.



Please pray for the intentions of my youngest son Vincent Michael (Conqueror-Who is like God) whose birthday is today.


Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         Universal Man Plan
·         Manhood of Christ Day 2, Twelfth Week.
·         90 Days for our Nation, 54-day rosary-Day 13
·         drink only water. Coffee and Tea are also allowed.



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