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SAINT BONIFACE 1 Chronicles, Chapter 21, Verse 29-30 29 The tabernacle of the LORD, which Moses had made in the wilderness, an...

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Wednesday, June 19, 2019



13 All Judah was standing before the LORD, with their little ones, their wives, and their children. 14 And the spirit of the LORD came upon Jahaziel, son of Zechariah, son of Benaiah, son of Jeiel, son of Mattaniah, a Levite of the clan of Asaph, in the midst of the assembly, 15 and he said: “Pay attention, all of Judah, inhabitants of Jerusalem, and King Jehoshaphat! The LORD says to you: Do not fear or be dismayed at the sight of this vast multitude, for the battle is not yours but God’s.

Pay attention the Lord is calling you to battle—but do not be afraid at the power of the secular world for the battle is not yours but God’s. He calls us to action.

Battle Call[1]

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Likening the 40-year struggle against legal abortion in the United States to the Israelites' 40 years in the desert, Father Carter Griffin encouraged the more than 14,000 people attending the Archdiocese of Washington's Jan. 25, 2013 Youth Rally and Mass for Life by being "a generation open to life, open to love (and) open to faith."

·         "You are a force to be reckoned with! The battle for the soul of our culture is up to you. This is your moment! I promise you, if you are faithful, you will change the world!"
·         "Forty years is a long time to restore this basic civil right to life, noting that the Lord let the Israelites, and lets today's defenders of life, know that they are not alone.”
·         "We too are being tested on our own 40-year journey, and like the Israelites, we have a choice -- to give in to discouragement, despair, frustration -- or to draw closer to the Lord, to grow in love, to open ourselves to his promise of salvation."
·         The battle against abortion is the greatest civil rights battle of all time," has to start with each person.
·         "Before we can change laws, we have to change hearts, starting with our own.
·         "Before pro-life is a political agenda, it must become a personal agenda. Before we can take on the culture of death, we have to become part of the culture of life, of eternal life!"

Father Griffin emphasized to the youths and young adults that "you are the future of this movement for life. It is a great responsibility, an awesome task, and it will be your glory to have been a part of it. And whether it takes another four years, or 40 years or 400 years, we will never give up."
As we battle for the life of innocent children, we must also be cognizant of the life of earth which God has charged us with being the stewards of the fruits of his creative work.

Protecting the Fruits of the Earth

“The liturgy itself teaches us this, when, during the presentation of the gifts, the priest raises to God a prayer of blessing and petition over the bread and wine, “fruit of the earth,” “fruit of the vine” and “work of human hands.” With these words, the rite not only includes in our offering to God all human efforts and activity, but also leads us to see the world as God’s creation, which brings forth everything we need for our sustenance. The world is not something indifferent, raw material to be utilized simply as we see fit. Rather, it is part of God’s plan, in which all of us are called to be sons and daughters in the one son of God, Jesus Christ (cf. EPH1:4-12). The justified concern about threats to the environment present in so many parts of the world is reinforced by Christian hope, which commits us to working responsibly for the protection of creation.” ~Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatis, 2007, § 92

Juneteenth[2]


Juneteenth, also called Freedom Day and Emancipation Day, celebrates the abolition of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, Union soldiers arrived in Texas to deliver news that President Lincoln has issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the enslaved. Although Lincoln's Proclamation was issued on January 1, 1863, it took nearly two and half years for word to travel from Washington to Texas. By then, Texas had amassed more than 250,000 slaves.

Since 1865, Juneteenth has been informally celebrated throughout the country however in 1980, Texas became the first state to recognize it as an official holiday. Shortly thereafter, other states also proclaimed the holiday. Today, Juneteenth is a celebration of African American freedom, heritage and culture observed through songs, communal cookouts and parades.

Juneteenth Facts & Quotes

·         According to the International Labor Organization, almost 21 million people are victims of forced labor today, 11+ million women and girls and 9+ million men and boys.
·         Juneteenth is a combination of the words June and Nineteenth about the date that slaves were freed in Texas.
·         The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere. - General Gordon Granger, Major General of the United States Army, Issued June 19, 1865.
·         ...I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. - President Abraham Lincoln, The Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863
Juneteenth Top Events and Things to Do

·         Read the Emancipation Proclamation.  The proclamation, issued by President Lincoln, declared all persons held as slaves within any State... shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free
·         Visit the Whitney Plantation, America's first slavery museum, to learn about impact of slavery in Southern America.  The museum contains exhibits, artwork, restored buildings and first-person slave narratives about the lives of those enslaved in Louisiana.
·         Sing traditional Juneteenth songs.  These include Swing low, Swing Chariot, and Lift Every Voice and Sing.
·         Attend the annual Juneteenth Emancipation Celebration at Emancipation Park, Houston Texas.
·         Attend a Juneteenth Musical Festival.  These are held across the United States; great ones can be found in Denver, Berkeley and Atlanta

Sauntering Day[3]


  • While stationed in Germany we would often saunter through the Fussganger Zone

“I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits unless I spend four hours a day at least – and it is commonly more than that – sauntering through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all worldly engagements.”
~ Henry David Thoreau

·         The world around us is moving at such a hectic pace, that we often forget to slow down and smell the proverbial roses. Even our walk is at high speed, pushing every inch of speed we can out of what is otherwise the most leisurely of modes of locomotion. It isn’t just an opportunity for us to remember to walk it is, more importantly, an opportunity for us to take a truly relaxed tack to the day and choose to saunter.

History of Sauntering Day
Saunter: v, a walk in a slow, relaxed manner, without hurry or effort.

·         This holiday was formed by W.T. Rabe in 1979 as a response to the sworn enemy of the Saunter, jogging. Jogging is a grueling attack on movement, with rapidity and effort being the purpose at hand, and all joy being drained from getting around by making each step as painful as possible. Perhaps we’re biased, but we believe the saunter to be the unquestionably superior alternative. Sauntering doesn’t just mean walking; it means walking as though the weight of the world has been lifted from your shoulders. It means being free from stress and strain, and instead focusing on the pure joy of walking. In fact, sauntering specifically implies that you will be moving in a joyful manner.

·         Sauntering Day is your opportunity to head out into the world and approach it with a deeply relaxed air, a moment of pure clarity and joy, all while enjoying the beautiful world around you and everything it has to offer.

How to Celebrate Sauntering Day


·         Give yourself plenty of time today and do so with the intent of relaxing and truly enjoying your journey to wherever it is you have to go. Saunter casually with pure relaxation and take in the scents and sights. Greet others, and don’t let their urge to move quickly infect yours. In fact, see if you can get them to slow down and join you on your happy little saunter. The world will be better for it, and you’ll be happier for it. Sauntering Day is your opportunity to leave all the rush behind and just… Saunter… through your day.

Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         90 Days for our Nation, 54-day rosary-Day 37
·         Pray for the aid of St. Joseph



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