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Tuesday, March 17, 2020


Tuesday in the Third Week of Lent
feast of st. Patrick


Daniel, Chapter 3, Verse 40-42
40 So let our sacrifice be in your presence today and find favor before you; for those who trust in you cannot be put to shame. 41 And now we follow you with our whole heart, we fear you and we seek your face. Do not put us to shame, 42 but deal with us in your kindness and great mercy.

Has your way of living been less than you wanted? Well? Welcome to the human condition. Emotions are what being human is about. Imagine the emotions of Peter after the resurrection. If your emotions or sinfulness despite your best efforts have left, you flat. You are human. Remember the disciples on the road to Emmaus; they were at left flat at the loss of the Christ. Like Peter they felt they could have done more. Today walk with our Lord tell Him all.

In a sermon by Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas she states:

“Put away the gods that your ancestors served...” Joshua declares. Doing that requires an act of self-examination. Spend at least five minutes with each question, even if all you do is listen to your heart.

·         What are the gods that I serve?
·         What does my bank statement or my credit card statement say about my values?
·         What does the way I spend my free time say about what matters most to me?
·         How does the way that I treat family-members and co-workers, neighbors and friends show which gods I serve?
·         To what do I give my best, most focused attention and care?
·         What do I Really care about?
·         What motives really drive me?
·         What goals really draw me forward?
·         Are there compulsive patterns of thought or behavior to which I am excessively attached?
You and I can go to church and say very sincerely that we worship God, but in the hurly-burly of daily life there are all kinds of lesser gods that tug at us and clamor for our attention and our devotion.[1]

Tuesday in the Third Week of Lent[2]

Prayer.

GRACIOUSLY hear us, O almighty and merciful God, and~ favorably grant to us the gifts of wholesome self-denial. Amen.


EPISTLE, iv. Kings iv. 1-7.

In those days a certain woman of the wives of the prophets cried to Eliseus, saying: Thy servant my husband is dead, and thou knowest that thy servant was one that feared the Lord, and behold the creditor is come to take away my two sons to serve him. And Eliseus said to her: What wilt thou have me do for thee? Tell me, what hast thou in thy house? And she answered: I thy handmaid have nothing in my house but a little oil, to anoint me. And he said to her: Go, borrow of all thy neighbor’s empty vessels not a few. And go in, and shut thy door, when thou art within, with thy sons: and pour out thereof into all those vessels, and when they are full take them away. So, the woman went, and shut the door upon her, and upon her sons: they brought her the vessels, and she poured in. And when the vessels were full, she said to her son: Bring me yet a vessel. And he answered: I have no more. And the oil stood. And she came and told the man of God. And he said: Go, sell the oil, and pay thy creditor: and thou and thy sons live of the rest.

GOSPEL. Matt, xviii. 15-22.

At that time Jesus said to His disciples: If thy brother shall offend against thee, go, and rebuke him between thee and him alone. If he shall hear thee, thou shalt gain thy brother. And if he will not hear thee, take with thee one or two more: that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may stand. And if he will not hear them: tell the Church. And if he will not hear the Church, let him be to thee as the heathen and publican. Amen I say to you, whatsoever you shall bind upon earth, shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever you shall loose upon earth, shall be loosed also in heaven. Again, I say to you, that if two of you shall consent upon earth, concerning anything whatsoever they shall ask, it shall be done to them by My Father Who is in heaven. For where there are two or three gathered together in My name, there am I in the midst of them. Then came Peter unto Him and said: Lord, how often shall my brother offend against me, and I forgive him? till seven times? Jesus saith to him: I say not to thee, till seven times; but till seventy times seven times.



Lenten Calendar[3]

Read: The Seven Penitential Psalms, Day One:

(During times when we wish to express repentance, and especially during Lent, it is customary to pray the seven penitential psalms. The penitential designation of these psalms’ dates back to the seventh century. Prayerfully reciting these psalms will help us to recognize our sinfulness, express our sorrow and ask for God’s forgiveness.)
Today we will focus on Psalm 6.

Reflect: Read this reflection on Psalm 6—Prayer in Distress

Pray: “Have pity on me, LORD, for I am       weak; heal me, LORD, for my bones are       shuddering.” (Ps 6:3, NABRE)

Act: In this psalm, the psalmist proclaims his weakness before God, with tears and sighing. Yet he lifts his prayers to the Lord, confident in the Lord, who is merciful.

Listen to a recording of Psalm 6 as you read along with your Bible.

ST. PATRICK[4] was born towards the close of the fourth century, but the place of his birth is not positively known. Britain and Scotland both claim the honor, but the best authorities seem to agree upon Brittany, in France. In his sixteenth year he was carried into captivity by certain barbarians, who took him into Ireland, where he was obliged to keep cattle on the mountains and in the forests, in hunger and nakedness, amidst snows, rain, and ice. The young man had recourse to God with his whole heart in fervent prayer and fasting and from that time faith and the love of God acquired continually new strength in his tender soul. After six months spent in slavery under the same master St. Patrick was admonished by God in a dream to return to his own country, and informed that a ship was then ready to sail thither. He went at once to the seacoast, though at a great distance, and found the vessel. After three days sail, they made land, but wandered twenty-seven days through deserts, and were a long while distressed for want of provisions. Patrick assured the company that if they would address themselves with their whole hearts to the true God He would hear and succor them. They did so, and on the same day met with a herd of swine. From that time provisions never failed them, till on the twenty-seventh day they came into a country that was cultivated and inhabited. Some years afterwards he was again led captive but recovered his liberty after two months. When he was at home with his parents, God manifested to him, by divers’ visions, that He destined him to the great work of the conversion of Ireland. The writers of his life say that after his second captivity he travelled into Gaul and Italy, and saw St. Martin, St. Germanus of Auxerre, and Pope Celestine, and that he received his mission and the apostolical benediction from this Pope, who died in 432. Great opposition was made to his episcopal consecration and mission, both by his own relations and by the clergy; but the Lord, whose will he consulted by earnest prayer, supported him, and he persevered in his resolution. He forsook his family, sold his birthright and dignity to serve strangers, and consecrated his soul to God, to carry His name to the ends of the earth. In this disposition he passed into Ireland to preach the Gospel, penetrating into the remotest corners; and such was the fruit of his preaching’s and sufferings that he baptized an infinite number of people. He ordained everywhere clergymen, induced women to live in holy widowhood and continence, consecrated virgins to Christ, and instituted monks. He took nothing from the many thousands whom he baptized, but gave freely of his own, both to pagans and Christians, distributed large alms to the poor in the provinces where he passed, and maintained and educated many children, whom he trained to serve at the altar. The happy success of his labors cost him many persecutions. He died and was buried at Down, in Ulster. His body was found there in a church of his name in 1185 and translated to another part of the same church.


A WARRIORS BREASTPLATE[5]

I bind unto myself today the power of God to hold and lead, His eye to watch, his might to stay, His ear to hearken to my need; the wisdom of my God to teach, his hand to guide, his shield to ward; the word of God to give me speech, his heavenly host to be my guard. Christ be with me, Christ within me, Christ behind me, Christ before me, Christ beside me, Christ to win me, Christ to comfort and restore me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ in quiet, Christ in danger, Christ in the hearts of all that love me, Christ in the mouth of friend and stranger.  Amen

Things to Do[6]

·         This is a good day to honor St. Patrick by trying typical Irish fare: corned beef and cabbage, soda bread, scones, stew, Shepherd's pie, potatoes in various forms and the famous beer and spirits of Ireland. For dessert, try making the Irish Porter Cake.

·         Read the Lorica (Breastplate) of St. Patrick. Here is an older translation — pray it with your family after your rosary tonight.

·         From the Catholic Culture library: The Conversion of Ireland by Warren Carroll, The Irish Soldiers of Mexico by Michael Hogan, The Irish Madonna of Hungary by Zsolt Aradi and Our Lady in Old Irish Folklore and Hymns by James F. Cassidy.

·         Don your friendliest green for St. Patrick’s Day. Boston is the place to be, with the city’s official St. Patrick’s Day Parade drawing anywhere from 600,000 to 1 million people every year.

Saint Patrick's Day Facts & Quotes[7]

·         St. Patrick used the three-leaf shamrock to explain the Trinity to non-Christians.  The leaves stood for the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

·         Approximately 5.5 million pints of Irish Guinness stout are consumed on an average day. On St. Patrick's Day, nearly 13 million are consumed.

·         Wearing the shamrock, a three-leaf clover is a St. Patrick's Day tradition. The official three-leaf clover is known scientifically as Trifolium dubium however clovers can also have more leaves. Four-leaf clovers are said to be lucky, however the odds of finding one are about 1 to 10,000.

·         The love of God and his fear grew in me more and more, as did the faith, and my soul was roused, so that, in a single day, I have said as many as a hundred prayers and in the night, nearly the same. - St. Patrick

·         Sláinte! - used when clinking glasses with friends at a bar (equivalent of Cheers or Health!)

Saint Patrick's Day Top Events and Things to Do

·         Wear green! In some parts of the world, the custom is to pinch people who aren't wearing the color of shamrocks.

·         Attend a St. Patrick's Day parade.  Major cities like Chicago, New York, San Francisco, Dallas, and Boston host marching bands and floats.

·         The heart of any Irish neighborhood is its local pub. Share a couple of green Guinness beers with friends at a local Irish pub or try Magner's (Bulmer's) apple cider as an alternative.

·         St. Patrick was a brave and humble man.  Have you been putting off something because you are afraid to do it?  Do it today in honor of St. Patrick's Day.

Almsgiving[8]


When we consider God valued the human person as so precious enough to die for, we should make a concerted effort to aid others.

The giving of Alms has everything to do with devotions and piety. Almsgiving is a powerful form of prayer. “Prayer and fasting are good, but better than either is almsgiving accompanied by righteousness…It is better to give alms than to store up gold; for almsgiving saves one from death and expiates every sin. Those who regularly give alms shall enjoy a full life” (Tob 12:8-9) To give alms is to give to God. If we are giving alms righteously then most likely we are doing it though some form of fasting giving from our substance. The giving of Alms should not philanthropy with a smiling photo op and boost to our pride. The earliest Christians knew they could not make a good Communion if they neglected the poor. St. Ignatius noted that the twin marks of heresy are the neglect of the poor and neglect of the Eucharist. “The mystery of the poor is this: that they are Jesus and what you do for them you do to him.” (Dorothy Day) The Eucharist is the key to a civilization of love. It saves us from misguided tenderness and feel-good philanthropy, because it gives us the grace to sacrifice as Jesus did. Our main focus must be widows and orphans. (Single parents and children) “Widows and orphan are to be revered like the altar of sacrifice.” (Pope Paul VI) We should give as much as we can and we should give it responsibly making sure the alms are not wasted.

Mormons in their almsgiving, for example, do fast offerings in addition to tithing. This offering accompanies a monthly 24-hour fast. All the money that would have been spent to buy food during those 24 hours is donated to the Church for the purpose of feeding the hungry and caring for the needy.

Aids in Battle[9] Declarations of Victory from the Word of God

When you become weakened and the outcome of the war seems uncertain, recall in faith that God’s ultimate triumph is secure.


·         You are of God, dear children, and have overcome him, because greater is He who is in you than he who is in the world. 1 Jn 4: 4

·         The LORD goes forth like a mighty man, like a man of war He stirs up His fury; He cries out, He shouts aloud; He shows Himself mighty against His foes. Is 42: 13

·         The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The LORD is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The LORD is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? Though a host encamp against me, my heart shall not fear; though war arise against me, yet I will be confident. One thing have I asked of the LORD, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the LORD, and to inquire in His temple. For He will hide me in His shelter in the day of trouble; He will conceal me under the cover of His tent, He will set me upon a high rock. And now my head shall be lifted up above my enemies round about me; and I will offer in His tent sacrifices with shouts of joy; I will sing and make melody to the LORD. .  .  . I believe that I shall see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living! Wait for the LORD; be strong, and let your heart take courage; yes, wait for the LORD! Ps 27: 1– 6, 13– 14

·         For, behold, your enemies, O LORD, for, behold, your enemies shall perish; all evildoers shall be scattered. Ps 92: 9

Daily Devotions
·         Nineveh 90-Total Consecration to Mary-Day 10
·         Manhood of the Master-week 6 day 2
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         Universal Man Plan
·         Pray for our nation.




[2] Goffines Devout Instructions, 1896
[4] Goffine’s Divine Instructions, 1896.
[5] St. Patrick
[8] Hahn, Scott, Signs of Life; 40 Catholic Customs and their biblical roots. Chap. 33. Almsgiving.
[9]Thigpen, Paul. Manual for Spiritual Warfare. TAN Books.



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