Sunday, June 26, 2022

 


Third Sunday after Pentecost

ST. JOSE ESCRIVA-GET OFF DRUGS DAY-CANOE DAY 

Malachi, Chapter 3, verse 5

I will draw near to you for judgment, and I will be swift to bear witness against sorcerers, adulterers, and perjurers, those who deprive a laborer of wages, oppress a widow or an orphan, or turn aside a resident alien, without FEARING me, says the LORD of hosts. 

The God of Abraham bears witness to evil, which is the use of people as objects. Our God is a just God who wishes us to be free of sorcerers, adulterers, perjurers, and enslavement of any kind. In modern terms God wants us free of sex, drugs and rock & roll. 

The entertainment industry uses sex; sex sells pure and simple. It diverts us from the true nature of our sexuality. That sex is a gift you give to someone to bring a new creation into the world. It is a gift that must be given freely, faithfully, and totally open to life. 

Sorcery is a Greek word that is closely related with Pharmakeia, and in fact is where our English word Pharmacy comes from. The indiscriminate use of drugs robs us of our soul; our very selves when we cannot say no to them. This could be any addictive substance whether it comes from a bottle, package or the internet. The only way to recover our sanity is through God or as 12 steppers say, “having a higher power than themselves”. A careful examination of the 12 step program reveals it is basically a form of repentance or confession and coming back to God. 

1.     We admit we are powerless.

2.     We believe in a greater power.

3.     We turn our will over to Him.

4.     We search our souls of wrongs committed.

5.     We admit our wrongs to ourselves and others.

6.     We are ready for God to remove our defects.

7.     We ask Him to remove our shortcomings.

8.     We list all we have harmed and be willing to correct the harm we have caused.

9.     We made amends except where to do so would cause more harm.

10.  We continue to build strength and virtue; promptly making corrections as needed.

11.  We pray and meditate daily.

12.  We carry (the cross) the message to others. 

Music is a gift from God just as sex is but, we must listen to the truth. Music can be noise that blatantly drowns out the truth. Many musicians and media personalities are perjurers of the truth. Their message is that of hopelessness and the objectification of women and people. Choose music that lifts up people rather than enslaves them to the ideas of the modern secular society of hedonism, materialism and minimalism. 

Our God will not turn a blind eye to those who enslave others economically either; or not care for our modern widows and orphans, which are single moms and fatherless children. Nor will our Lord, allow us to make slaves of immigrants to our country. 

No, we must be a righteous people, good to all as He is. 

ON KEEPING THE LORDS DAY HOLY[1]

 

CHAPTER V

 

DIES DIERUM

 

Sunday: The Primordial Feast, Revealing the Meaning of Time

Sunday in the Liturgical Year

78. Likewise, "in celebrating this annual cycle of the mysteries of Christ, the holy Church venerates with special love the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, united forever with the saving work of her Son".  In a similar way, by inserting into the annual cycle the commemoration of the martyrs and other saints on the occasion of their anniversaries, "the Church proclaims the Easter mystery of the saints who suffered with Christ and with him are now glorified".  When celebrated in the true spirit of the liturgy, the commemoration of the saints does not obscure the centrality of Christ, but on the contrary extols it, demonstrating as it does the power of the redemption wrought by him. As Saint Paulinus of Nola sings, "all things pass, but the glory of the saints endures in Christ, who renews all things, while he himself remains unchanged".  The intrinsic relationship between the glory of the saints and that of Christ is built into the very arrangement of the Liturgical Year, and is expressed most eloquently in the fundamental and sovereign character of Sunday as the Lord's Day. Following the seasons of the Liturgical Year in the Sunday observance which structures it from beginning to end, the ecclesial and spiritual commitment of Christians comes to be profoundly anchored in Christ, in whom believers find their reason for living and from whom they draw sustenance and inspiration.

 

Third Sunday after Pentecost[2]

 

Because of God's mercy, the Holy Spirit works to build the kingdom of God even in sinful souls.

ON this Sunday, in the Introit of the Mass, the Church invites the sinner to call on the Lord with confidence and humility. “Look Thou upon me and have mercy upon me, O Lord, for I am alone and poor. See my abjection and my labor, and forgive me all my sins, O my God. To Thee, O Lord, have I lifted up my soul; in Thee, O my God, I put my trust, let me not be ashamed” (Ps. xxiv.).

Prayer. O God, the protector of those who hope in Thee, without Whom nothing is strong, nothing is holy, multiply Thy mercy upon us, that under Thy rule and guidance we may so pass through the goods of time as not to forfeit those of eternity.

EPISTLE. I. Peter v. 6-11.

Dearly Beloved: Be you humbled under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you in the time of visitation. Casting all your care upon Him, for He hath care of you. Be sober and watch: because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, goeth about seeking whom he may devour. Whom resist ye, strong in faith, knowing that the same affliction befalleth your brethren who are in the world. But the God of all grace, Who hath called us unto His eternal glory in Christ Jesus, after you have suffered a little, will Himself perfect you, and confirm you, and establish you. To Him be glory and empire forever and ever. Amen.

GOSPEL. Luke xv. 1-10.

At that time the publicans and sinners drew near unto Jesus to hear Him. And the Pharisees and the scribes murmured, saying: This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them. And He spoke to them this parable, saying “What man of you that hath an hundred sheep, and if he shall lose one of them, doth he not leave the ninety-nine in the desert, and go after that which was lost until he find it? And when he hath found it, lay it upon his shoulders rejoicing; and coming home call together his friends and neighbors, saying to them: Rejoice with me, because I have found my sheep that was lost? I say to you, that even so there shall be joy in heaven upon one sinner that doth penance, more than upon ninety-nine just who need not penance. Or what woman having ten groats*, if she lose one groat (small coin) doth not light a candle and sweep the house and seek diligently until she find it? And when she hath found it, call together her friends and neighbors, saying: Rejoice with me, because I have found the groat which I had lost. So, I say to you, there shall be joy before the angels of God upon one sinner doing penance.”

Why did the Pharisees murmur?

Because they thought themselves better than other men, and as they avoided the company of sinners themselves, they required others to do likewise. They did not know, or rather did not wish to know, that a truly just man always feels compassion for sinners, and that the saints always desired and endeavored to promote their conversion and eternal welfare. “True justice, says St. Gregory, has compassion for sinners, while false and hypocritical justice is angry with them. Love sinners, therefore, in imitation of Jesus, and pray earnestly for their conversion.”

What does the parable of the lost sheep teach us?

It teaches us the love of Jesus, Who seeks out sinners, brings them back to the Father, and reinstates them in the privileges of the children of God. We find in this parable an excuse for sinners. The sheep is a very simple animal which, while grazing in the field, does not notice that it has left the fold. It is lost, and when lost does not know the way back to the fold. It seems, therefore, when Christ compared the sinner to a sheep He intended to say that the sinner goes astray from the true path and from God through pure and natural ignorance; because being dazzled and delighted by the things of the world, he follows them; he separates himself from the just without knowing it, and, lost in the desert of this world, he does not know his misfortune and has not, humanly speaking, the means of returning again, if God in His infinite mercy does not go in search of him and rescue him.

What is meant by the words, “there shall be more joy over one sinner that does penance than upon ninety-nine just who need not penance?

Thereby it is not to be understood that the penitent sinner is more pleasing to God than ninety-nine just, but that, as men have a special joy in finding that which they supposed to be lost, so also God, the angels, and saints have an extraordinary joy over the conversion of one sinner; because, in the conversion of the sinner, they see the glory, love, and power of God exalted.

Aspiration.

O Lord, what profit hast Thou in the conversion of a sinner, that Thou art thereby so greatly pleased? The happiness of one of Thy poor creatures can add nothing to Thine own. But Thou lovest me, and therefore it is that Thou art pleased if I return to Thee. O my God, is it possible that I can know this Thy love, and remain any longer in sin?

Building up the Kingdom[3]

 

This Sunday focuses on God's mercy, the Holy Spirit works to build the kingdom of God even in sinful souls. 

 

Scripture and the Church teach us that we have three divinely ordained purposes that give our lives meaning:

 

·       Salvation seeking to save our eternal souls and help save the souls of others (that salvation, the Church teaches, is God's free gift but requires our cooperation through faith in God, obedience to his commandments, and repentance of our grave sins).

·       Service using our God-given talents to build God's kingdom here on earth.

·       Sanctity growing in holiness.

 

The third of these life goals, sanctity, is central to building Catholic character. At the end of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus says something that is stunning: "Be thou made perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect" (Mt 5:48). St. Gregory put it this way: "The goal of a virtuous life is to become like God." Scripture tells us, "God is love" (1 Jn 4:16). If we want to be like God, our vocation is to love. The essence of love is to sacrifice for the sake of another, as Jesus did. Love is self-gift. What, then, is our goal if we want to develop Catholic character in our children and ourselves? Look to the character of Christ: A life of self-giving.

 

Natural Virtues

 

The high goal of Christ-like character builds on a base of what the Church calls "natural virtues." Among the natural virtues that families and schools should nurture are the four advanced by the ancient Greeks, named in Scripture (Wis 8:7), and adopted by the Church as "the cardinal virtues": prudence, which enables us to judge what we should do; justice, which enables us to respect the rights of others and give them what they are due; fortitude, which enables us to do what is right in the face of difficulties; temperance, which enables us to control our desires and avoid abuse of even legitimate pleasures. These natural virtues are developed through effort and practice, aided by God's grace. To develop a Christ-like character, however, we need more than the natural virtues. We also need the three supernatural, or "theological," virtues:

 

Spiritual Virtues

 

1.     Faith in God, which enables us to believe in God and the teachings of his church.

2.     Hope in God, which leads us to view eternal life as our most important goal and to place total trust in God.

3.     Love of God, which enables us to love God above all things and our neighbor as ourselves for the love of God.

 

The three theological virtues are considered supernatural because they come from God and have as their purpose our participation in God's divine life. As the Catechism (1813) teaches, the theological virtues are not separate from the natural virtues; rather, they "are the foundation of Christian moral activity; they animate it and give it its special character." The Catholic writer Peter Kreeft points out, "The Christian is prudent, just, courageous, and self-controlled out of faith in God, hope in God, and love of God." The supernatural virtues, like the natural virtues, grow stronger through our effort and practice, in cooperation with God's grace.

 

St. Josemaria Escriva[4] was born in 1902 at Barbastro Spain. He was ordained in Saragossa in 1925 and by divine inspiration founded Opus Dei which opened a new way for the faithful to sanctify themselves in the midst of the world. He died on June 26, 1975 and was canonized a saint on October 6, 2002.


 

Things to Do:

·       Read a longer biography of St. Josemaria and at Anastpaul

·       Visit this site to find St. Josemaria Escriva's writings

·       View this video on St. Josemaria Escriva at YouTube

·       Visit Opus Dei's official US website.

 

Opus Dei[5]

Work, family life, and the ordinary events of each day are opportunities for drawing close to Christ and making Him known to others. As the Second Vatican Council taught, every baptized person is called to follow Christ closely, by living according to the Gospel and making its teachings known to others. The aim of Opus Dei is to contribute to that evangelizing mission of the Church, by fostering among Christians of all social classes a life fully consistent with their faith, in the middle of the ordinary circumstances of their lives and especially through the sanctification of their work. The following are some of the main features of the spirit of Opus Dei:

·       Divine filiation is the foundation of the spirit of Opus Dei,” said its founder, Saint Josemaría Escrivá. A Christian is a child of God by virtue of baptism. Thus, the formation provided by the Prelature seeks to foster among the Christian faithful a deep awareness of their being children of God, and helps them act accordingly. It fosters confidence in divine providence, simplicity in their dialogue with God, a deep awareness of the dignity of each human being and of the need for fraternity among all people, a truly Christian love for the world and for all human realities created by God, and a sense of calm and optimism.

·       Ordinary life. “It is in the midst of the most material things of the earth that we must sanctify ourselves, serving God and all mankind,” said Saint Josemaría. The family, marriage, work – all of our activities – are opportunities for drawing close to and imitating Jesus, trying to practice charity, patience, humility, diligence, integrity, cheerfulness, and all the other human and Christian virtues.

·       Sanctifying work means to work with the spirit of Christ, to work competently and ethically, with the aim of loving God and serving others, and thus to sanctify the world from within, making the Gospel present in all activities whether they be outstanding or humble and hidden. In the eyes of God what matters is the love that is put into work, not its human success.

·       Prayer and sacrifice. The formation given by Opus Dei encourages prayer and sacrifice in order to sustain the effort to sanctify one’s ordinary occupations. Thus, members strive to incorporate into their life’s certain practices of Christian piety, such as prayer, daily Mass, sacramental confession, and reading and meditating on the Gospel. Devotion to our Lady occupies an important place in their hearts. Also, in striving to imitate Christ, they try to acquire a spirit of penance by offering up small sacrifices, particularly those that help them fulfill their duties faithfully and make life more pleasant for others, such as renouncing small pleasures, fasting, almsgiving, etc.

·       Unity of life. Saint Josemaría explained that Christians working in the world should not live “a kind of double life. On the one hand, an interior life, a life of union with God; and on the other, a separate and distinct professional, social and family life.” On the contrary: “There is just one life, made of flesh and spirit. And it is this life which has to become, in both soul and body, holy and filled with God.”

·       Freedom. The members of Opus Dei are ordinary citizens who enjoy the same rights and are subject to the same obligations as any other citizen. In their professional, family, political, financial or cultural activities, they act with freedom and personal responsibility, not involving the Church or Opus Dei in their decisions, nor presenting those decisions as the only Catholic solutions. This implies respecting the freedom and the opinions of others.

·       Charity. To meet Christ is to find a treasure that one cannot stop sharing. Christians are witnesses to Jesus and spread his message of hope among their companions, with their example and their words. “Side by side with our colleagues, friends and relatives and sharing their interests, we can help them come closer to Christ,” wrote Saint Josemaría. The wish to make others know Christ, which is a direct consequence of charity (that is, love of God above all things and of one’s neighbor as oneself), cannot be separated from the desire to contribute to finding solutions to the material needs and social problems of one’s surroundings.

International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking[6]

Today serves to draw awareness to the need for action and cooperation in order to achieve a drug-free world.  Illicit drugs and their trafficking pose a large health threat to humanity. Drug problems and dependencies put a great deal of pressure on health care systems and constitute a threat to the safety and well-being of humans all around the globe. Long-term drug abuse has been linked to poor general health, contraction of diseases through needle sharing, trouble with the law, poor self-hygiene and alienation from loved ones, psychological illnesses and death from overdose. In December 1987, the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking was designated by the United Nations. It is celebrated annually on June 26, a symbolic day that commemorates the dismantling of the opium trade in Guangdong. The day also serves as an opportunity for Member Nations to reaffirm their support for UN Conventions that attempt to control the world's drug supply.

Facts & Quotes

·       The UN estimates that in 2007, the value of the illegal drug trade is 322 billion dollars per year.

·       Approximately 51 billion dollars is spent on the war on drugs in the US every year.

·       No one is immune from addiction; it afflicts people of all ages, races, classes, and professions. – Patrick J. Kennedy, American democratic politician and former US representative for Rhode Island.

Top Events and Things to Do

·       Watch a movie on the perils of the war on drugs on society, government and the citizens involved. Some suggestions are Dallas Buyers Club (2013), Sicario (2015), Requiem for a Dream (2000), Christiane F (1981) and Blow (2001).

·       Spread awareness by using the hashtags #InternationalDayAgainstDrugAbuseandIllicitTrafficking, #saynotodrugs and #warondrugs on social media.

·       Read a book on the dangers of drug use and the problems with the war on drugs. Some suggestions are: Smoke and Mirrors, Chasing the Scream, and Drug Wars.

Canoe Day[7]

There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace. Sigurd F. Olson

There is a special day for just about every hobby nowadays, and canoeing doesnt miss out on the fun, with its very own day of aquatic paddling celebration. Canoeing is a fantastic hobby, and along with being environmentally friendly and relaxing, it is also a great form of outdoor exercise thats suitable for all ages. It is no surprise that canoeing gets its own day of celebration, with so many fans around the world. Canoeing is an easy activity to learn, and with some basic safety gear anyone can hit the water and enjoy this healthy hobby.

The way of a canoe is the way of the wilderness, and of a freedom almost forgotten. It is an antidote to insecurity, the open door to waterways of ages past, and a way of life with profound and abiding satisfaction. Sigurd F. Olson

Despite the huge popularity of paddling a canoe, Canoe Day began in 2007. Since that time, it has become the highlight of every canoe loving fan each year, and you can find activities in all regions of the world to enjoy paddling with new friends. Canoes have been part of cultures all over the world, from the deep South Pacific to the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Used for commerce and hunting, fishing and recreation, the role theyve played in the cultures of the past and in the world of today cannot be understated. Even better, its a great way to get healthy and stay in shape while getting out in to the wild. Going out to sea in a canoe is another unique experience, one that has you above the water, but right down on it where you can enjoy visits from critters like otters and seals.

How to Celebrate

Celebrating Canoe Day is easy! You get out there and become one with your canoe! Explore the great wide open and find adventure and freedom in the steady rhythm of your paddles pushing you along. There are places you cant get with roads or on foot, only the river will take you there. Get out there and find what the world has to offer, and come back with a sense of wonder and profound peace in your soul.

When a man is part of his canoe, he is part of all that canoes have ever known. Sigurd F. Olson

Catechism of the Catholic Church

PART TWO: THE CELEBRATION OF THE CHRISTIAN MYSTERY

SECTION ONE THE SACRAMENTAL ECONOMY

CHAPTER ONE THE PASCHAL MYSTERY IN THE AGE OF THE CHURCH

    • Article 1 THE LITURGY - WORK OF THE HOLY TRINITY

I. The Father-Source and Goal of the Liturgy

1077 "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places, even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and blameless before him. He destined us before him in love to be his sons through Jesus Christ, according to the purpose of his will, to the praise of his glorious grace which he freely bestowed on us in the Beloved."

1078 Blessing is a divine and life-giving action, the source of which is the Father; his blessing is both word and gift. When applied to man, the word "blessing" means adoration and surrender to his Creator in thanksgiving.

1079 From the beginning until the end of time the whole of God's work is a blessing. From the liturgical poem of the first creation to the canticles of the heavenly Jerusalem, the inspired authors proclaim the plan of salvation as one vast divine blessing.

1080 From the very beginning God blessed all living beings, especially man and woman. the covenant with Noah and with all living things renewed this blessing of fruitfulness despite man's sin which had brought a curse on the ground. But with Abraham, the divine blessing entered into human history which was moving toward death, to redirect it toward life, toward its source. By the faith of "the father of all believers," who embraced the blessing, the history of salvation is inaugurated.

1081 The divine blessings were made manifest in astonishing and saving events: the birth of Isaac, the escape from Egypt (Passover and Exodus), the gift of the promised land, the election of David, the presence of God in the Temple, the purifying exile, and return of a "small remnant." the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms, interwoven in the liturgy of the Chosen People, recall these divine blessings and at the same time respond to them with blessings of praise and thanksgiving.

1082 In the Church's liturgy the divine blessing is fully revealed and communicated. the Father is acknowledged and adored as the source and the end of all the blessings of creation and salvation. In his Word who became incarnate, died, and rose for us, he fills us with his blessings. Through his Word, he pours into our hearts the Gift that contains all gifts, the Holy Spirit.

1083 The dual dimension of the Christian liturgy as a response of faith and love to the spiritual blessings the Father bestows on us is thus evident. On the one hand, the Church, united with her Lord and "in the Holy Spirit," blesses the Father "for his inexpressible gift in her adoration, praise, and thanksgiving. On the other hand, until the consummation of God's plan, the Church never ceases to present to the Father the offering of his own gifts and to beg him to send the Holy Spirit upon that offering, upon herself, upon the faithful, and upon the whole world, so that through communion in the death and resurrection of Christ the Priest, and by the power of the Spirit, these divine blessings will bring forth the fruits of life "to the praise of his glorious grace."

Week ahead

·       Wednesday, June 29th Feast of St’s Peter and Paul

·       Friday, July 1st, First Friday

·       Saturday, July 2nd, First Saturday

·       Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Daily Devotions

·       Today in honor of the Holy Trinity do the Divine Office giving your day to God. To honor God REST: no shopping after 6 pm Saturday till Monday. Don’t forget the internet.

·       Unite in the work of the Porters of St. Joseph by joining them in fasting: Growth of Catholic Families and Households

·       Know that you are on a great stage where all heaven and earth are watching you. What message is our life giving?

·       Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus

·       Offering to the sacred heart of Jesus

·       Drops of Christ’s Blood

·       Universal Man Plan

·       Nineveh 90-Day 72

·       Rosary




[2] Goffine’s Devout Instructions, 1896

* medieval silver coin

[3]http://www.catholiceducation.org/en/education/catholic-contributions/building-catholic-character-5-things-parents-can-do.html

[4]https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/calendar/day.cfm?date=2019-06-26

[7] https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/canoe-day/




Comments