Thursday, October 18, 2018


FEAST OF ST. LUKE

Romans, Chapter 5, Verse 8
But God proves his love for us in that while we were still sinners Christ died for us.

Christ out of pure love frees us from the shame of not being right with God in this He gives us a new life and peace with God the Father. Christ by His works brings us refreshment from the filth of our lives by giving us (1) confidence, (2) peace and (3) eternal life via the sacrifice of the Eucharist. He did this even though we failed to bear good fruit and fostered sin not living up to the Fathers vision for us.[1]

Via Christ selfless act we can today talk to God; now if we could only listen in return.
Amoris Lætitia[2] Growing in conjugal love, Dialogue (136-141)
Talk is essential for experiencing, expressing and fostering love. Our ways of asking, and responding to questions, the tone we use, our timing and any number of other factors form how well we communicate. We need to develop certain attitudes that express love and encourage authentic dialogue.
1.      Take time, quality time. This means being ready to listen patiently and attentively to everything the other person wants to say. It requires the self-discipline of not speaking until the time is right. Instead of offering an opinion or advice, we need to be sure that we have heard everything the other person has to say. This means promoting an interior silence that makes it possible to Listen to the other person without mental or emotional distractions. Do not be rushed, put aside all of your own needs and worries, and make space. Often the other spouse does not need a solution to his or her problems, but simply to be heard, to feel that someone has acknowledge their pain, their disappointment, their fear, their anger, their hopes and their dreams. How often we hear complaints like: “He does not listen to me.” “Even when you seem to, you are really doing something else.” “I talk to her and I feel like she can’t wait for me to finish.” “When I speak to her, she tries to change the subject, or she gives me curt responses to end the conversation”.
2.      Develop the habit of giving real importance to the other person. This means appreciating them and recognizing their right to exist, to think as they do and to be happy. Never downplay what they say or think, even if you need to express your own point of view. Everyone has something to contribute, because they have their life experiences, they look at things from a different standpoint and they have their own concerns, abilities and insights. We ought to be able to acknowledge the other person’s truth, the value of his or her deepest concerns, and what it is that they are trying to communicate, however aggressively. We have to put ourselves in their shoes and try to peer into their hearts, to perceive their deepest concerns and to take them as a point of departure for further discussion.
3.      Keep an open mind. Don’t get bogged down in your own limited ideas and opinions but be prepared to change or expand them. The combination of two different ways of thinking can lead to a synthesis that enriches both. The unity that we seek is not uniformity, but a “unity in diversity”, or “reconciled diversity”. Fraternal communion is enriched by respect and appreciation for differences within an overall perspective that advances the common good. We need to free ourselves from feeling that we all have to be alike. A certain astuteness is also needed to prevent the appearance of “static” that can interfere with the process of interchange. For example, if hard feelings start to emerge, they should be dealt with sensitively, lest they interrupt the dynamic of dialogue. The ability to say what one is thinking without offending the other person is important. Words should be carefully chosen so as not to offend, especially when discussing difficult issues. Making a point should never involve venting anger and inflicting hurt. A patronizing tone only serves to hurt, ridicule, accuse and offend others. Many disagreements between couples are not about important things. Mostly they are about trivial matters. What alters the mood, however, is the way things are said or the attitude with which they are said.
4.      Show affection and concern for the other person. Love surmounts even the worst barriers. When we love someone, or when we feel loved by them, we can better understand what they are trying to communicate. Fearing the other person as a kind of “rival” is a sign of weakness and needs to be overcome. It is very important to base one’s position on solid choices, beliefs or values, and not on the need to win an argument or to be proved right.
5.      Finally, let us acknowledge that for a worthwhile dialogue we have to have something to say. This can only be the fruit of an interior richness nourished by reading, personal reflection, prayer and openness to the world around us. Otherwise, conversations become boring and trivial. When neither of the spouses works at this, and has little real contact with other people, family life becomes stifling and dialogue impoverished.
Feast of Saint Luke[3]


Into whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace to this household.'

This day celebrates the life of St. Luke, one of Jesus' 12 disciples.  Luke was thought to be an educated Gentile, or non-Jew, and may have even been a physician.  Some biblical historians believe he may have even been a slave. Luke wrote two books in the New Testament -- the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles. The Gospel of Luke focuses on converting non-Jews to Christianity.

St Luke Facts

·         Luke worked with the apostle Paul, and traveled with him throughout Asia Minor, proclaiming the Good News of Jesus Christ.
·         The Gospel of Luke describes a popular passage referred to as the 'The Parable of the Good Samaritan'.   In it a traveling man is attacked by robbers who strip and beat him.  A priest and a Levite pass by without helping him.  A Samaritan stops and cares for him, taking him to an inn where the Samaritan pays for his care. (Luke 10:25-37)
·         What became of Luke is unclear.  Some accounts say he was martyred, while others say that he lived to an old age and died in Greece.
·         The feast Day for St. Luke is held on October 18 in the Roman Catholic, Orthodox Church and some Protestant churches.  The Orthodox Church refers to this day as the Feast of the Holy Apostle and Evangelist Luke.

St Luke Top Events and Things to Do

·         Read the second chapter of the Gospel of Luke.  This is the story that is most often read at Christmas time about the birth of Jesus Christ.
·         Read the popular 'Parable of the Good Samaritan'.  Use this to inspire you to go out of your comfort zone to help someone in need.
·         Some traditions believe that St. Luke, in addition to being a writer and physician, was a painter.  Do a little artwork today to honor the saint.
·         Go get a check up.  Luke was a physician.  Take care of your body in honor of St. Luke.
·         Pray for doctors and those who care for the sick through the intercession of St. Luke, patron of physicians.
·         Foods this day to honor St. Luke would include some beef dish, as he is known as the "ox" and is the patron of butchers. For dessert, bake some raisin Banbury Tarts to evoke the festivals of England on this day, or a cake in the shape of a book with decorations of a calf or ox for this evangelist.
·         Today is also known as "Sour Cakes Day" in Scotland, because baked cakes were eaten with sour cream in Rutherglen.
·         Around this feast is known as "St. Luke's Little Summer," a period of summer-like days that occur around October 18 named to honor the saint's feast day. It's similar to the the term "Indian Summer," which officially occurs between November 11-20). St. Luke gives us some golden days before the cold of winter.

Cyprus’s Painted Churches[4]

Above seaside Lemosos and on the eastern flank of 6,500-foot Mt. Olympus, you’ll also find ten magnificent medieval churches and monasteries, whose modest exteriors stand in contrast to their rich interiors, embellished with some of the finest Byzantine frescoes and icons in the Mediterranean. At the ornate 11th-century Kykkos Monastery, even the cloisters are richly frescoed, and a golden icon of the Virgin ascribed to St. Luke is said to work miracles. Agios Nikolaos tis Stegis (St. Nicholas of the Roof) is covered entirely in wall paintings. The monks who lived here were not only gifted artists but also master vintners, following a 5,500-year-old wine-making tradition in Cyprus. Stop at Chrysorrogiatissa Monastery for a visit to the region’s oldest wine-making site. The dark amber– colored Commandaria, a sweet wine that was a favorite elixir of medieval crusaders, is thought to be the world’s oldest appellation and is made from centuries-old vines in the Troodos foothills. For something with a little more kick, stop in any village bar for a glass of zivania, a centuries-old Cypriot beverage produced from the residue of grapes. With a 45 percent (and up) alcohol content, it is also used to treat wounds and sore throats.

The Way[5] Prayer

"Read these counsels slowly. Pause to meditate on these thoughts. They are things that I whisper in your ear-confiding them-as a friend, as a brother, as a father. And they are being heard by God. I won't tell you anything new. I will only stir your memory, so that some thought will arise and strike you; and so you will better your life and set out along ways of prayer and of Love. And in the end you will be a more worthy soul."

108. I like to see you living that 'ambitious reparation'. The world! you say. — Very good, but first of all, the members of your supernatural family, your own relations, the people of your country.

Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood



[1] The Collegeville Bible Commentary
[2] Pope Francis, Encyclical on Love.
[4]Schultz, Patricia. 1,000 Places to See Before You Die
[5]http://www.escrivaworks.org/book/the_way-point-1.htm

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