Tuesday, April 9, 2019


Tuesday of the Fifth Week of Lent


Judges, Chapter 6, Verse 23
The LORD answered him: You are safe. Do not fear. You shall not die.

Unlike Gideon, whom this verse is about, most of us do not have an angel appear from heaven to tell us that we will not die and to not be afraid. Yet, we have something greater than an angel here; we have the Lord Jesus Christ telling us-Do not fear.

We are blessed because we are the receivers of the apex of God’s graces through Jesus Christ, His mother and the action of Divine Mercy. If you are afraid to start again or are discouraged by failure it is because you do not understand you can do nothing without Christ. Therefore, if you have sinned go to confession and receive His Body and Blood: being renewed. I remember in 2006 when I and my wife Mary were blessed with being able to make a trip to Israel. I was reflecting upon the graces I had received. I was thanking the Lord for I had touched the spot on the earth where He was born, and I had touched the spot where He had died, and I had touched the spot where He had ascended into heaven. I was prideful and thought how lucky am I. Then my Lord reminded me that a greater grace still awaits me and everyone in the Holy Eucharist. Be honest, humble yourself and make a sincere effort. Leave all else in His hands-saying: Jesus I Trust in You!

Pride wants immediate success. Be brave as Gideon and renew your intentions, make a resolution daily to do the will of God and seek to please Him.

Tuesday in Passion Week[1]

Prayer. MAY our fasts be acceptable to Thee, O Lord, and, by expiating our sins, may they make us worthy of Thy grace, and conduct us to eternal salvation.

EPISTLE. Daniel xiv. 28-42.

In those days the Babylonians came to the king, and said: Deliver us Daniel, or else we will destroy thee and thy house. And the king saw that they pressed upon him violently: and being constrained by necessity he delivered Daniel to them. And they cast him into the den of lions, and he was there six days. And in the den, there were seven lions, and they had given to them two carcasses every day, and two sheep: but then they were not given unto them to the intent that they might devour Daniel. Now there was in Judea a prophet called Habacuc, and he had boiled pottage, and had broken bread in a bowl: and was going into the field, to carry it to the reapers.

And the angel of the Lord said to Habacuc: Carry the dinner which thou hast into Babylon to Daniel, who is in the lion’s den. And Habacuc said: Lord, I never saw Babylon, nor do I know the den. And the angel of the Lord took him by the top of his head, and carried him by the hair of his head, and set him in Babylon over the den in the force of his spirit. And Habacuc cried, saying: O Daniel, thou servant of God, take the dinner that God hath sent thee. And Daniel said: Thou hast remembered me, O God, and Thou hast not forsaken them that love Thee. And Daniel arose and ate. And the angel of the Lord presently set Habacuc again in his own place. And upon the seventh day the king came to bewail Daniel: and he came to the den, and looked in, and behold Daniel was sitting in the midst of the lions. And the king cried out with a loud voice, saying: Great art Thou, O Lord the God of Daniel. And he drew him out of the lion’s den. But those that had been the cause of his destruction, he cast into the den, and they were devoured in a moment before him. Then the king said: Let all the inhabitants of the whole earth fear the God of Daniel: for He is the Saviour, working signs, and wonders in the earth: Who hath delivered Daniel out of the lion’s den.


GOSPEL. John vii. 1-13.

At that time: Jesus walked in Galilee; for He would not walk in Judea, because the Jews sought to kill Him. Now the Jews feast of Tabernacles was at hand. And His brethren said to Him: Pass from hence, and go into Judea: that Thy disciples also may see Thy works which Thou dost. For there is no man that doth anything in secret, and he himself seeketh to be known openly. If Thou do these things, manifest Thyself to the world. For neither did His brethren believe in Him. Then Jesus said to them: My time is not yet come: but your time is always ready. The world cannot hate you; but Me it hateth: because I give testimony of it, that the works thereof are evil. Go you up to this festival-day, but I go not up to this festival- day: because My time is not accomplished. When He had said these things, He Himself stayed in Galilee. But after His brethren were gone up, then He also went up to the feast, not openly, but as it were in secret. The Jews therefore sought Him on the festival-day, and said: Where is He?

And there was much murmuring among the multitude concerning Him. For some said: He is a good man. And others said: No, but He seduceth the people. Yet no man spoke openly of Him, for fear of the Jews.

Lenten Calendar[2]

Read: The Servant Songs, Day Two: (Within the Book of the Prophet Isaiah we encounter four poetic sections known as the Songs of the Suffering Servant. The specific identity of this Servant of the Lord remains the topic of scholarly debate. Perhaps it refers to the prophet Isaiah himself, perhaps the entire nation of Israel, or possibly the promised Messiah. Christian faith sees these prophetic utterances fulfilled in the life, ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus the Lord. Because of the Christian identification of the Suffering Servant with Jesus, the four Servant Songs become a way of encountering the Lord during this Lenten Season. Not only do they give us a sense of the commitment and endurance that characterized his messianic ministry, but they become a way of touching the bruised face of the Messiah, of hearing the resolute determination that sustained him in the midst of trial, and of rejoicing with him in Gods ultimate vindication of his calling and service.)

The second song, spoken in the Servant’s own voice, tells of being selected from the womb to become God’s mouthpiece and help renew the nation.


Pray: Take time with the second Servant Song today. Read Isaiah 49:1-7.

Act: The prophet proclaims the call and destiny of the servant of the Lord, who is called and chosen to reveal the light of God to the world.



Aids in Battle[3] Know that God has punked the Devil

Hell, and the Devil have been pillaged, stripped of their ancient armor, robbed of their special power. And just as the giant Goliath had his head cut off with his own sword, so also has the Devil, the father of death, been put to rout through the death of Christ. He finds that the very same weapon he used to wield as the ready tool of his deceit has now become the mighty instrument of his own destruction. We might put it this way: The Devil went fishing and cast his line and hook to catch yet another man in death. But the Man he caught this time was Christ, whose divine nature was hidden within His human nature. For this reason, the martyrs leap upon the head of that dragon the Devil, and look with disdain on every kind of torment. ST. GREGORY THAUMATURGUS

Incense[4]


Catholic tradition engages the whole person; all the senses and has been called at times the religion of “bells and smells.” God created us as a unity of body and soul, and we return ourselves entirely to him in worship. We worship him is spirit and truth and, in our worship, we present our bodies as a living sacrifice. Thus, the Churches worship engages all that we are both body and senses. We contemplate during worship the mysteries of God using our total selves; our hearing, sight, taste, touch, and smells. We ring bells to herald the Lord’s appearance and we burn incense before his altar. Our worship is good and true, but it is also beautiful.

The Mass is a reenactment of the death of our Lord. It is thought-provoking to contemplate that Pilate’s notice above Christ’s head, was printed in three languages Hebrew, Latin and Greek. These three cultures in a sense represented the characteristics of God. The Hebrew’s were Gods people and represented the good of man and brought the idea that the person was created by God and is more valuable than the universe. Latin the language of the Romans brought the idea that truth is the highest value and the Greek culture brought the idea of beauty being the greatest value. In Christ’s death is represented all three values. That a good God died for man; true to the end; and His shame was turned by love to beauty.

Via the Masses worldwide we live out the words of the prophet Malachi 1:11,

From the rising of the sun to its setting, my name is great among the nations; Incense offerings are made to my name everywhere, and a pure offering; for my name is great among the nations, says the LORD of hosts.”

The offering of incense was an essential duty of the priests of the Old Covenant, and the ancient law took special care to prescribe its fragrances, vessels, and rites. Jesus’ kinsman Zechariah was performing his priestly duty, burning incense in the Temple, when the angel Gabriel appeared to him. This was the hour of incense. Incense was the most emblematic form of worship; it was an outward sign of the inner mystery that is true prayer. Incense is so closely associated with worship that; it became the very image of infidelity to burn incense to idols. To burn incense was and still is a richly symbolic act of worship.

Daily Devotions
·         Drops of Christ’s Blood
·         Universal Man Plan
·         Manhood of Christ Day 7, Fifth Week.



[1] Goffine’s Devout Instructions, 1896
[2]http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/liturgical-year/lent/april-9.cfm
[3] Thigpen, Paul. Manual for Spiritual Warfare. TAN Books.
[4] Hahn, Scott, Signs of Life; 40 Catholic Customs and their biblical roots. Chap. 23. Incense.

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